Top 33 Slang For Connections – Meaning & Usage

In a world where networking is key, having the right lingo can make all the difference. Slang for connections is essential for navigating the social and professional landscapes with ease. Let us guide you through the latest terms that will help you level up your communication game and make those meaningful connections that count. Get ready to upgrade your vocab and take your connections to the next level with our curated list of trendy phrases and expressions!

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1. Plug

In the context of slang for connections, “plug” refers to someone who can provide or supply something, often in a clandestine or illicit manner. It can also be used to describe the source of a particular item or information.

  • For example, a person might say, “I know a plug who can get us tickets to the sold-out concert.”
  • In a discussion about obtaining rare sneakers, someone might mention, “My plug just got me the latest release.”
  • Another usage could be, “Do you have a plug for good quality weed?”

In slang, “link” is used to describe a connection or contact who can help with a particular need or provide access to something. It signifies a relationship or association that can be beneficial in some way.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a link at the company who can get me an interview.”
  • In a conversation about finding a reliable mechanic, a person might mention, “I’ll give you the link to my guy.”
  • Another usage could be, “Do you have any links for affordable housing in the city?”

3. Hookup

In the context of slang for connections, “hookup” refers to someone who can provide a favorable deal or offer, often related to goods or services. It implies a connection that can provide an advantage or benefit.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have a hookup at the store who can get us a discount.”
  • In a discussion about getting free concert tickets, someone might mention, “I know a guy who can hook us up.”
  • Another usage could be, “Can you give me a hookup for a reliable plumber?”

4. Network

In slang, “network” refers to a group or system of connections that can be accessed for various purposes. It implies a web of relationships or contacts that can be tapped into for support or opportunities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to expand my network to find more job opportunities.”
  • In a conversation about finding potential investors, a person might mention, “I’m attending a networking event to meet new contacts.”
  • Another usage could be, “Having a strong network is essential for success in any industry.”

5. Contact

In the context of slang for connections, “contact” refers to a person who has influence or information that can be helpful or valuable. It signifies an individual who can provide assistance or insights.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have a contact in the music industry who can help with your career.”
  • In a discussion about obtaining insider information, someone might mention, “I’ll reach out to my contacts and see what I can find.”
  • Another usage could be, “Do you have any contacts at the university who can provide more information?”

6. Ally

An ally is someone who supports and stands by you, especially in a difficult situation or during a conflict. It can also refer to a person or group that shares similar goals or interests.

  • For example, “She has been my ally throughout this whole process.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The two parties formed an unlikely alliance to pass the bill.”
  • A person discussing social justice might say, “We need more allies in the fight for equality.”

7. Insider

An insider is someone who has special knowledge or access to information within a particular group or organization. It can also refer to someone who is well-connected and has access to exclusive opportunities.

  • For instance, in the stock market, an insider might have information about a company that the general public does not have.
  • In the entertainment industry, an insider might have access to exclusive events or insider information about upcoming projects.
  • A person discussing politics might say, “As an insider, I have firsthand knowledge of how the system works.”

8. Associate

An associate is someone you work with or have a professional relationship with. It can also refer to a business connection or someone you are affiliated with in a professional capacity.

  • For example, “He is my associate at the law firm.”
  • In a corporate setting, one might say, “She is an associate at the company.”
  • A person discussing networking might say, “I have many valuable associates in my industry.”

9. Liaison

A liaison is a person who acts as a connection or intermediary between two or more parties. It can also refer to someone who facilitates communication or cooperation between different groups or organizations.

  • For instance, in international relations, a liaison officer might work to improve cooperation and communication between two countries.
  • In a business context, a liaison might be responsible for coordinating between different departments or teams.
  • A person discussing community engagement might say, “We need a liaison to bridge the gap between the government and the local community.”

10. Cohort

A cohort refers to a group or team of people who share a common characteristic, experience, or goal. It can also refer to a group of individuals who are part of a particular study or research project.

  • For example, “She is part of my cohort in the leadership program.”
  • In a medical study, one might say, “The researchers followed a cohort of patients over a period of ten years.”
  • A person discussing teamwork might say, “I have a great cohort of colleagues who always support and motivate each other.”

11. Collaborator

A collaborator refers to someone who works together with another person on a specific project or task. In the context of slang for connections, it can also refer to a partner in crime or someone who assists in illegal activities.

  • For example, in a business setting, a colleague might say, “I need a collaborator for this marketing campaign.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “He’s my trusted collaborator in all our heists.”
  • A person discussing a secret mission might mention, “I have a collaborator on the inside who will help us gather information.”

12. Comrade

Comrade is a term often used to refer to a friend or ally, especially in a political or military context. It signifies a sense of camaraderie and solidarity.

  • For instance, a soldier might address a fellow soldier as “comrade” to show mutual respect and unity.
  • In a political rally, a speaker might say, “We stand together, comrades, in the fight for justice.”
  • A person discussing their close group of friends might say, “These are my comrades, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

13. Accomplice

An accomplice is someone who helps or participates in a criminal act or wrongdoing. It often implies a level of collaboration or partnership in carrying out illegal activities.

  • For example, in a bank robbery scenario, a person who assists the main robber is considered an accomplice.
  • In a crime investigation, a detective might refer to someone who knowingly aided a criminal as an accomplice.
  • A person discussing a secret plan might say, “I need an accomplice who can help me execute this mission.”

14. Sidekick

A sidekick is a term often used to refer to a trusted partner or assistant who accompanies and supports the main character or protagonist. It implies a close bond and a sense of loyalty.

  • For instance, in superhero stories, the sidekick is the hero’s loyal companion who aids them in their adventures.
  • In a buddy cop movie, the main detective might have a sidekick who provides comic relief and assistance.
  • A person discussing their best friend might say, “He’s been my sidekick since we were kids, always there for me.”

15. Wingman

A wingman is someone who provides support and assistance to another person, especially in social situations like dating or finding a romantic partner. They help boost the confidence and help make a connection.

  • For example, in a bar, a person might ask their friend to be their wingman and help initiate conversations with potential partners.
  • In a group outing, a person might say, “I need a wingman to help me navigate the crowd and meet new people.”
  • A person discussing their close friend might say, “He’s the best wingman, always looking out for me and helping me make connections.”

16. Confidant

A confidant is someone you trust and share your secrets or personal matters with. It is someone who you can rely on and confide in.

  • For example, “I told my confidant about my deepest fears and insecurities.”
  • In a conversation about personal relationships, someone might say, “Having a confidant is important for emotional support.”
  • A person might introduce their confidant by saying, “This is my confidant, the person I trust the most.”

17. Buddy

Buddy is a casual term used to refer to a friend or companion. It is often used to address someone in a friendly and familiar way.

  • For instance, “Hey buddy, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’m going to the movies with my buddies.”
  • A person might describe their relationship with someone by saying, “We’ve been buddies since childhood.”

18. Pal

Pal is a term used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is a friendly and informal way to address someone.

  • For example, “Hey pal, want to grab a drink?”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re all pals here.”
  • A person might introduce their pal by saying, “This is my pal, we’ve known each other for years.”

19. Chum

Chum is a term used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is a more lighthearted and playful way to address someone.

  • For instance, “Hey chum, let’s go on an adventure!”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re all chums, always there for each other.”
  • A person might describe their bond with someone by saying, “We’ve been chums since we were kids.”

20. Mate

Mate is a term used to refer to a friend or companion, commonly used in British English and Australian English. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone.

  • For example, “Hey mate, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re all mates, like a big family.”
  • A person might introduce their mate by saying, “This is my mate, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

21. BFF

This term is used to refer to someone who is your closest and most trusted friend. BFFs are like family and are always there for each other.

  • For example, “I’ve known my BFF since kindergarten and we’ve been inseparable ever since.”
  • A person might say, “I can always count on my BFF to have my back.”
  • Another might post a picture with their BFF and caption it, “Celebrating 10 years of friendship with my BFF!”

22. Ride or Die

This phrase refers to someone who is willing to stick by your side no matter what, even in the toughest of situations.

  • For instance, “She’s my ride or die. We’ve been through thick and thin together.”
  • A person might say, “I need a ride or die friend who will always have my back.”
  • Another might describe their best friend as, “She’s not just a friend, she’s my ride or die.”

23. Homie

This term is used to refer to a close friend or someone from your neighborhood or community.

  • For example, “Hey, homie! What’s up?”
  • A person might say, “Me and my homies are going to hang out tonight.”
  • Another might introduce their friend as, “This is my homie, we go way back.”

This phrase is used to suggest meeting or getting together with someone.

  • For instance, “Let’s link up for coffee tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t seen you in ages, we should definitely link up soon.”
  • Another might ask, “Are you free to link up this weekend?”

25. Hook up

This term can refer to engaging in casual sexual activity with someone, often without any commitment or emotional attachment.

  • For example, “They hooked up at the party last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not looking for a relationship right now, just want to hook up.”
  • Another might ask, “Did you hook up with anyone while you were on vacation?”

26. Compadre

Compadre is a term used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is often used in a friendly and informal way to address someone you have a strong bond with.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey compadre, let’s grab a drink after work.”
  • In a conversation about a shared experience, one might say, “We’ve been through a lot together, compadre.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my compadre, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

27. Colleague

Colleague is a term used to refer to someone you work with, often in a professional setting. It denotes a person who shares the same occupation or workplace as you.

  • For instance, in a conversation about a work project, one might say, “I discussed the idea with my colleagues.”
  • When introducing someone at a business event, a person might say, “This is my colleague, we work together at the same company.”
  • A person might seek advice from a colleague by saying, “Can I get your opinion on this matter, colleague?”

28. Crony

Crony is a term used to refer to a close friend or companion, often with a connotation of loyalty or camaraderie. It is usually used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m meeting up with my cronies for a game night.”
  • In a conversation about a shared interest, one might say, “My cronies and I are big fans of this band.”
  • A person might refer to their close friend as their “partner in crime” or “crony.”
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29. Homeboy

Homeboy is a term used to refer to a close friend, often someone from the same neighborhood or community. It carries a sense of familiarity and camaraderie.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ve known my homeboy since we were kids.”
  • In a conversation about a shared experience, one might say, “Me and my homeboy went on a road trip last summer.”
  • A person might call out to their friend by saying, “Hey, homeboy, let’s hang out later.”

30. Connect

Connect is a term used to refer to establishing a connection or relationship with someone. It can mean to meet up or communicate with someone, often for a specific purpose.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s connect for coffee and discuss the project.”
  • In a conversation about networking, one might say, “I need to connect with more professionals in my field.”
  • A person might ask for someone’s contact information by saying, “Can we connect on social media?”

31. Intimate

This term is often used as a slang word for a romantic partner or significant other. It signifies a close and intimate relationship with someone.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out with my bae tonight.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might ask, “How long have you been with your bae?”
  • A social media post might read, “Feeling grateful for my amazing bae.”

32. Acquaintance

An acquaintance is someone you know but aren’t very close to. It refers to a person you have met or interacted with, but don’t have a deep relationship with.

  • For instance, if you recognize someone from your neighborhood but don’t know them well, they would be considered an acquaintance.
  • In a conversation about mutual friends, you might say, “Oh, I know him. He’s just an acquaintance.”
  • When introducing someone you don’t know very well, you might say, “This is my acquaintance, John.”

33. Peer

A peer refers to someone who is at the same level or has similar characteristics or abilities as you. It often refers to someone in the same profession or field of work.

  • For example, if you work in a company, your co-workers would be your peers.
  • In a discussion about academic achievements, someone might say, “She received recognition from her peers for her research.”
  • When collaborating on a project, you might say, “I’m excited to work with my peers on this assignment.”