Top 34 Slang For Grounded – Meaning & Usage

Being grounded can feel like a drag, but fear not! We’ve got you covered with the latest slang that’ll have you communicating like a pro even when you’re stuck at home. From “house arrest” to “lockdown,” our team has rounded up the trendiest phrases that’ll keep you in the know and maybe even make being grounded a little more bearable. So, buckle up and get ready to spice up your conversations with this fresh batch of grounded slang!

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1. Benched

This term is often used to describe someone who is unable to participate in a particular activity or event. It can refer to being sidelined or excluded from a specific situation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I was benched for the game because of an injury.”
  • In a discussion about work projects, someone might mention, “I was benched on that assignment because they needed me for another project.”
  • A student might complain, “I got benched from the school dance because of my behavior.”

2. Confined

Being confined means being limited to a specific area or space. It can refer to physical restrictions or limitations on one’s movement or activities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I feel so confined in this small apartment.”
  • In a conversation about travel, a person might mention, “I’ve been confined to my hometown for months because of the pandemic.”
  • A prisoner might express, “Being confined to a cell all day is incredibly difficult.”

3. Restricted

When something is restricted, it means there are limitations or controls placed on it. It can refer to a wide range of situations where freedom or access is limited.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have restricted access to certain files at work.”
  • In a discussion about diet, someone might mention, “I’m on a restricted eating plan to manage my health.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Your phone usage is restricted to two hours a day.”

4. House Arrest

House arrest is a legal term that refers to being confined to one’s home as a form of punishment or restriction. It often involves strict rules and monitoring.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He was sentenced to house arrest for six months.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice, someone might mention, “House arrest is sometimes used as an alternative to incarceration.”
  • A news article might report, “The celebrity is under house arrest while awaiting trial.”

5. Stuck at Home

This phrase is commonly used to describe the feeling of being unable to leave one’s home or being confined to a specific location.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m so bored being stuck at home all day.”
  • In a conversation about travel restrictions, someone might mention, “I’ve been stuck at home for months because of the pandemic.”
  • A student might complain, “I’m stuck at home studying for exams while my friends are out having fun.”

6. On Lockdown

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone is not allowed to leave their home or go outside. It can also refer to being confined to a certain area or being under strict supervision.

  • For example, during a pandemic, someone might say, “I’ve been on lockdown for weeks and I’m going stir-crazy.”
  • A parent might tell their teenager, “You’re grounded and on lockdown until further notice.”
  • In a prison setting, a guard might say, “The inmates are on lockdown due to a security threat.”

7. Grounded AF

This slang phrase is used to emphasize that someone is grounded to the extreme. The “AF” stands for “as f***” and adds emphasis to the level of restriction or punishment.

  • For instance, a teenager might say, “I can’t go to the party tonight, I’m grounded AF.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why are you grounded AF?” and the person might respond, “I missed curfew three nights in a row.”
  • Someone might complain, “My parents are always grounding me for the smallest things. I’m always grounded AF.”

8. In the Doghouse

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone is in trouble or facing consequences for their actions. It can imply a sense of being in a metaphorical “doghouse” where one is temporarily isolated or receiving less favorable treatment.

  • For example, a husband might say, “I forgot our anniversary and now I’m in the doghouse.”
  • A child might tell their friend, “I broke my mom’s favorite vase and now I’m in the doghouse.”
  • A coworker might say, “I missed an important deadline and now I’m definitely in the doghouse with my boss.”

9. Sent to Coventry

This slang phrase is derived from a historical practice where someone would be sent to Coventry, a city in England, as a form of punishment. Being “sent to Coventry” means being deliberately ignored or excluded by a group or community.

  • For instance, if someone tells a joke that falls flat, their friends might jokingly say, “You’re being sent to Coventry for that one.”
  • In a school setting, a group of students might decide to send a classmate to Coventry as a prank.
  • A coworker might say, “I made a mistake at work and now everyone is sending me to Coventry.”

10. In the Cooler

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone is temporarily confined or restricted, similar to being placed in a cooler or refrigerator. It can imply a sense of being isolated or removed from a certain environment or activity.

  • For example, if someone gets into a fight at a bar, the bouncer might say, “You’re in the cooler for the rest of the night.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You’re in the cooler until you finish your homework.”
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might say, “You’re in the cooler until the investigation is complete.”

11. In the Penalty Box

This phrase is often used to describe being grounded or facing consequences for misbehavior. It implies being confined to a certain area or having privileges taken away.

  • For example, a parent might say, “You’re in the penalty box for a week, no TV or video games.”
  • A teenager might complain, “I can’t believe I’m in the penalty box for missing curfew.”
  • A friend might sympathize, “I know how it feels to be in the penalty box, it sucks.”

12. On Ice

This term refers to being closely monitored or restricted in one’s activities. It suggests being “put on ice” or kept in a controlled environment.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “You’re on ice until further notice, no going out with friends.”
  • A teacher might warn, “If you don’t turn in your homework, you’ll be on ice for the next class.”
  • A sibling might taunt, “Looks like someone’s on ice and can’t go to the party.”

13. In the Slammer

This phrase is slang for being grounded and implies being confined or restricted to a certain space or area.

  • For example, a parent might say, “You’re in the slammer for a week, no phone or internet.”
  • A teenager might grumble, “I can’t believe I’m in the slammer just because I didn’t clean my room.”
  • A friend might sympathize, “Being in the slammer sucks, but it’ll be over soon.”

14. In the Naughty Corner

This term refers to being grounded or facing consequences for misbehavior. It suggests being placed in a designated area as a form of punishment.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “You’re in the naughty corner for an hour, think about what you did.”
  • A teacher might warn, “If you keep talking during class, I’ll put you in the naughty corner.”
  • A sibling might tease, “Looks like someone’s in the naughty corner and can’t play with their toys.”

15. Confiscated

This term implies having something taken away as a form of punishment or restriction. It suggests that privileges or belongings have been temporarily or permanently removed.

  • For example, a parent might say, “Your phone is confiscated until further notice, no more texting.”
  • A teacher might announce, “If anyone is caught cheating, their test will be confiscated.”
  • A friend might sympathize, “I hate when my things get confiscated, it’s so unfair.”

16. Under House Arrest

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone is not allowed to leave their house due to legal reasons or punishment. It can also be used humorously to describe being grounded.

  • For example, “After getting caught stealing, he was under house arrest for six months.”
  • A teenager might complain, “My parents caught me sneaking out, now I’m under house arrest.”
  • Someone jokingly might say, “I broke curfew once and now I’m under house arrest according to my parents.”

17. Confined to Quarters

This phrase originated in the military and refers to someone being confined to a specific area, typically their living quarters. It can also be used to describe being grounded or restricted to a certain location.

  • For instance, “Due to the lockdown, everyone was confined to quarters.”
  • A parent might say, “You’re grounded and confined to quarters until further notice.”
  • Someone jokingly might say, “I’m confined to quarters until I finish my chores.”

18. Locked Up

This phrase is commonly used to describe being in prison or jail. It can also be used to describe being grounded or confined to a specific location.

  • For example, “He was locked up for three years for his crimes.”
  • A parent might say, “You’re locked up in your room until you apologize.”
  • Someone jokingly might say, “I’m locked up at home until my parents trust me again.”

19. Grounded like a Plane

This phrase humorously compares being grounded to a plane that is unable to take off. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is not allowed to leave their house or participate in certain activities.

  • For instance, “After failing their exams, they were grounded like a plane for the entire summer.”
  • A parent might say, “You’re grounded like a plane until your grades improve.”
  • Someone jokingly might say, “I got caught sneaking out, now I’m grounded like a plane.”

20. In the Time Out Chair

This phrase refers to a disciplinary action where someone is made to sit in a designated chair or area as a form of punishment. It can also be used to describe being grounded or restricted from certain activities.

  • For example, “After misbehaving, the child was put in the time-out chair for ten minutes.”
  • A parent might say, “You’re in the time-out chair until you apologize.”
  • Someone jokingly might say, “I got caught skipping class, now I’m in the time-out chair.”

21. In the Sin Bin

This slang term refers to being punished or restricted, similar to being put in a penalty box in sports. It implies that someone has done something wrong and is now facing consequences.

  • For example, a parent might say, “You’re in the sin bin for a week, no TV or video games.”
  • A teacher might say, “If you don’t finish your homework, you’ll end up in the sin bin.”
  • A friend might joke, “Looks like you’re in the sin bin for breaking curfew last night.”

22. Laid Up

This slang term is used to describe someone who is unable to leave their home or is bedridden due to illness, injury, or other reasons.

  • For instance, if someone has a broken leg, they might say, “I’m laid up at home until it heals.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you still laid up with that flu?”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m laid up with a migraine.”

23. Docked

This slang term refers to being restricted or grounded, similar to a ship being docked and unable to move. It implies that someone’s freedom or privileges have been taken away as a form of punishment.

  • For example, a parent might say, “You’re docked for a week, no going out with friends.”
  • A teacher might say, “If you don’t turn in your assignment, you’ll be docked.”
  • A boss might say, “You’re docked for the day, no leaving the office until your work is done.”

24. Quarantined

This slang term refers to being isolated or confined, often due to a contagious illness or disease. It implies that someone is separated from others to prevent the spread of the illness.

  • For instance, if someone tests positive for COVID-19, they might say, “I’m quarantined at home for two weeks.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you still quarantined after your trip?”
  • A person might say, “I can’t come to the party, I’m quarantined with the flu.”

25. Grounded

This slang term refers to being restricted from activities or privileges as a form of punishment. It implies that someone is not allowed to participate in certain things or go certain places.

  • For example, a parent might say, “You’re grounded for a month, no TV or hanging out with friends.”
  • A teacher might say, “If you don’t behave, you’ll be grounded.”
  • A friend might joke, “Looks like you’re grounded for breaking curfew last night.”

26. Forbidden

When someone is forbidden, it means that they are not allowed to leave their house or go out due to being grounded. This term emphasizes the restriction and lack of freedom that comes with being grounded.

  • For example, a teenager might complain, “I’m forbidden from going to the party this weekend.”
  • A friend might sympathize and say, “That’s rough, being forbidden sucks.”
  • In a conversation about rules and consequences, someone might mention, “When I was forbidden as a kid, it taught me to be more responsible.”

27. Locked down

Being locked down refers to the state of being grounded and not being able to leave the house or go out. This term emphasizes the feeling of being trapped or confined due to the restrictions imposed.

  • For instance, a teenager might say, “I hate being locked down, I feel like I’m in prison.”
  • A parent might use this term to explain the consequences of breaking the rules, saying, “If you keep misbehaving, you’ll be locked down for a week.”
  • In a discussion about discipline, someone might comment, “Being locked down can be tough, but it’s important for teaching responsibility.”

28. Housebound

When someone is housebound, it means they are restricted to their house and not allowed to go out. This term emphasizes the confinement and isolation that comes with being grounded.

  • For example, a teenager might say, “I’m so bored being housebound, I wish I could hang out with my friends.”
  • A sibling might tease, “Enjoy your time being housebound, it’s not often you get a break from the outside world.”
  • In a conversation about punishment, someone might say, “Being housebound can be a good opportunity for reflection and learning.”

29. Stuck

When someone is stuck, it means they are unable to go out or leave their house due to being grounded. This term emphasizes the feeling of being trapped or unable to escape the situation.

  • For instance, a teenager might complain, “I’m so stuck at home, I can’t believe I can’t go to the concert.”
  • A friend might sympathize and say, “Being stuck sucks, but it’s just temporary.”
  • In a discussion about consequences, someone might mention, “When I was stuck as a kid, it made me appreciate the freedom I had when I wasn’t grounded.”

30. In detention

When someone is in detention, it means they are grounded and not allowed to leave the house or go out. This term emphasizes the similarity between being grounded and being punished or confined in a school detention.

  • For example, a teenager might say, “I can’t believe I’m in detention, it’s so unfair.”
  • A parent might use this term to explain the consequences of breaking the rules, saying, “If you don’t follow the rules, you’ll end up in detention.”
  • In a conversation about discipline, someone might comment, “Being in detention teaches you to think twice before breaking the rules again.”

31. Confined to the house

This phrase refers to being restricted to the house and not being able to leave. It implies a sense of confinement and limited freedom.

  • For example, a teenager might complain, “I’m so bored being confined to the house all day.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go out because I’m confined to the house with a broken leg.”
  • During a quarantine, someone might post on social media, “Day 10 of being confined to the house. I’m running out of things to do!”

32. Limited to home

This phrase means being restricted or limited to one’s home and not being able to go out or leave. It implies a lack of freedom and mobility.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m limited to home until my car gets fixed.”
  • During a lockdown, someone might tweet, “We are all limited to home to help stop the spread of the virus.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You’re grounded and limited to home until your grades improve.”

33. Confined to the premises

This phrase refers to being confined or restricted to the premises or property, typically referring to not being allowed to leave a specific area or location.

  • For example, a security guard might say, “You are confined to the premises until your visitor’s pass is approved.”
  • In a workplace, an employee might be told, “You are confined to the premises until the end of your shift.”
  • A person might say, “I’m confined to the premises of this hotel until my quarantine period is over.”

34. On house arrest

This phrase is used to describe a legal status where a person is confined to their own residence as a form of punishment or monitoring. It implies being under strict surveillance and not being able to leave the house.

  • For instance, a news headline might read, “Famous celebrity placed on house arrest for tax evasion.”
  • In a crime documentary, a narrator might say, “The suspect was put on house arrest while awaiting trial.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go out because I’m on house arrest for the next six months.”
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