Top 50 Slang For Avoid – Meaning & Usage

Sometimes, avoiding certain situations or people can be a challenge. But fear not, because we’ve got your back! We’ve put together a list of the top slang words for avoid that will help you navigate through those tricky moments with ease. From clever phrases to catchy acronyms, this listicle is your go-to guide for staying clear of anything you’d rather skip. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your avoidance game!

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1. Dodge

To dodge means to avoid or evade something, often quickly or skillfully. It can be used in a physical sense, as well as metaphorically.

  • For example, “He tried to punch me, but I managed to dodge it.”
  • In a game of dodgeball, a player might say, “I dodged all of their throws.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m trying to dodge all the traffic on my way to work.”

2. Evade

To evade means to escape or avoid something, often through cunning or deceit. It can be used in various contexts, from physical evasion to avoiding a question.

  • For instance, “The suspect managed to evade the police by hiding in an abandoned building.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “He always evades my questions whenever I ask about his past.”
  • A student might say, “I’m trying to evade doing my homework by pretending to be sick.”

3. Sidestep

To sidestep means to avoid or bypass something, often by taking a different route or approach. It can be used in both literal and figurative situations.

  • For example, “She sidestepped the puddle on the sidewalk.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “Let’s sidestep that controversial topic and focus on something else.”
  • A politician might try to sidestep a difficult question by redirecting the conversation.

4. Steer clear of

To steer clear of means to avoid or stay away from something or someone, often due to potential danger or negative consequences. It implies a deliberate effort to keep a distance.

  • For instance, “I always steer clear of that neighborhood at night.”
  • In a warning, someone might say, “Steer clear of that person; they’re trouble.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to steer clear of junk food and eat healthier.”

5. Shun

To shun means to reject or avoid someone or something, often due to disapproval or dislike. It implies a deliberate act of exclusion or isolation.

  • For example, “She was shunned by her community after the scandal.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “He shunned all invitations to parties and preferred to be alone.”
  • A person might say, “I shun any form of discrimination and treat everyone with respect.”

6. Elude

To escape or avoid something or someone, especially in a skillful or cunning manner.

  • For example, “The suspect managed to elude the police by hiding in an abandoned building.”
  • A person might say, “I always try to elude awkward conversations at parties.”
  • In a game of tag, a player might boast, “You can’t catch me, I can elude anyone!”

7. Skirt

To go around or avoid something, often by taking an indirect or unconventional route.

  • For instance, “She decided to skirt the heavy traffic by taking side streets.”
  • A person might say, “I try to skirt around controversial topics to avoid arguments.”
  • In a discussion about rules, someone might argue, “There are always people who try to skirt the rules and find loopholes.”

8. Escape

To break free or avoid confinement or a dangerous situation.

  • For example, “The prisoners managed to escape from the maximum-security prison.”
  • A person might say, “I need a vacation to escape the stress of work.”
  • In a thrilling novel, the protagonist might narrowly escape from the clutches of the villain.

9. Duck

To quickly move out of the way in order to avoid being hit or seen.

  • For instance, “He ducked behind a tree to avoid being spotted.”
  • A person might say, “I had to duck to avoid getting hit by the flying ball.”
  • In a game of dodgeball, a player might shout, “Duck!” before throwing the ball.

10. Circumvent

To find a way around or avoid something, often by using clever or indirect methods.

  • For example, “They managed to circumvent the security system and gain access to the building.”
  • A person might say, “I try to circumvent long lines by arriving early.”
  • In a discussion about rules, someone might argue, “There are always ways to circumvent the regulations if you know how.”

11. Miss

To intentionally not do or experience something. “Miss” is often used to indicate the act of avoiding or skipping something.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go to a party and you decline, you might say, “No thanks, I’m going to miss that one.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “I’m going to miss the touristy spots and explore the local neighborhoods instead.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to miss the meeting because I have a conflicting appointment.”

12. Bypass

To avoid or circumvent something by taking an alternate route or method. “Bypass” is often used to indicate avoiding or sidestepping something.

  • For instance, if there’s heavy traffic on a road, someone might say, “Let’s take the bypass and avoid the congestion.”
  • In a conversation about dietary restrictions, someone might say, “I have to bypass foods with gluten because of my allergy.”
  • A person might suggest, “Let’s bypass the long line by using the self-checkout.”

13. Ignore

To intentionally pay no attention to or disregard something or someone. “Ignore” is often used to indicate avoiding or dismissing something.

  • For example, if someone is being rude, you might say, “Just ignore them and they’ll eventually stop.”
  • In a discussion about distractions, someone might say, “I try to ignore my phone when I need to focus on work.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to avoid an argument, sometimes it’s best to ignore certain comments.”

14. Neglect

To fail to give proper care, attention, or consideration to something or someone. “Neglect” is often used to indicate avoiding or disregarding something.

  • For instance, if someone forgets to water their plants, they might say, “I neglected them and now they’re dying.”
  • In a conversation about household chores, someone might say, “I tend to neglect cleaning the windows.”
  • A person might admit, “I neglected my health for a long time, but now I’m trying to take better care of myself.”

15. Pass up

To intentionally decline or reject an opportunity or offer. “Pass up” is often used to indicate avoiding or missing out on something.

  • For example, if someone offers you a piece of cake but you don’t want any, you might say, “I’ll pass it up.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might say, “I regret passing up that job offer.”
  • A person might suggest, “Don’t pass up the chance to travel while you’re young.”

16. Disregard

To intentionally pay no attention to or ignore something or someone.

  • For example, “You can disregard that email, it’s just spam.”
  • In a conversation about advice, someone might say, “Don’t disregard their warnings, they have experience.”
  • A manager might instruct their team, “Please disregard the previous memo, there was an error.”

17. Abstain

To choose not to do or participate in something, especially something that is considered unhealthy or undesirable.

  • For instance, “I decided to abstain from drinking alcohol at the party.”
  • In a discussion about voting, someone might say, “If you don’t agree with any of the candidates, you can abstain from voting.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to lose weight, it’s best to abstain from sugary drinks.”

18. Resist

To try to prevent or stop something from happening or to refuse to accept or comply with something.

  • For example, “I need to resist the urge to eat junk food.”
  • In a conversation about peer pressure, someone might say, “It’s important to resist negative influences.”
  • A person might encourage, “Resist the temptation to give up, keep pushing forward.”

19. Forsake

To deliberately give up or renounce something or someone.

  • For instance, “He decided to forsake his career to pursue his passion.”
  • In a discussion about loyalty, someone might say, “I will never forsake my friends.”
  • A person might reflect, “Sometimes, you have to forsake old habits to grow and change.”

20. Keep away from

To deliberately avoid or stay away from something or someone.

  • For example, “I try to keep away from negative people.”
  • In a conversation about allergies, someone might say, “I have to keep away from peanuts.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to stay healthy, keep away from sugary drinks.”

21. Give a wide berth to

This phrase means to keep a safe distance from someone or something, usually because they are dangerous or unpleasant. It can also imply avoiding involvement or contact with a particular person or situation.

  • For example, “I always give a wide berth to that neighborhood at night.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, someone might say, “It’s best to give a wide berth to people who bring negativity into your life.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to avoid drama, give a wide berth to gossip.”

22. Turn a blind eye to

This expression means to deliberately ignore or overlook something, usually because it is unpleasant or inconvenient. It implies choosing not to acknowledge or take action against a particular behavior or situation.

  • For instance, “The teacher turned a blind eye to the students cheating on the test.”
  • In a conversation about office politics, someone might say, “Sometimes it’s better to turn a blind eye to minor conflicts.”
  • A person might admit, “I know I should address the issue, but I tend to turn a blind eye to my roommate’s messy habits.”

23. Keep clear of

This phrase means to avoid or stay away from someone or something. It suggests maintaining distance or avoiding involvement in order to prevent negative consequences or conflicts.

  • For example, “I always keep clear of that park after dark.”
  • In a discussion about personal boundaries, someone might say, “It’s important to establish and communicate what behaviors you want others to keep clear of.”
  • A person might caution, “Keep clear of people who constantly bring drama into your life.”

24. Keep at arm’s length

This expression means to keep someone or something at a distance, both physically and emotionally. It implies maintaining a cautious or reserved approach and avoiding close contact or involvement.

  • For instance, “I prefer to keep toxic people at arm’s length.”
  • In a conversation about personal space, someone might say, “I appreciate it when people respect my need to keep at arm’s length.”
  • A person might admit, “I tend to keep at arm’s length when it comes to sharing personal information.”

25. Stay away from

This phrase means to keep a distance from someone or something, usually because they are considered harmful, dangerous, or undesirable. It implies actively avoiding or refraining from involvement or contact.

  • For example, “I always stay away from that part of town.”
  • In a discussion about bad habits, someone might say, “If you want to improve your health, stay away from processed foods.”
  • A person might advise, “Stay away from negative people who drain your energy.”

26. Keep one’s distance

This slang phrase means to maintain a physical or emotional distance from someone or something, usually to avoid trouble or conflict.

  • For example, if someone is known for causing drama, you might say, “I try to keep my distance from them.”
  • In a dangerous situation, someone might warn, “Keep your distance from that edge.”
  • If someone is offering a questionable opportunity, you might advise, “I think it’s best to keep your distance and avoid getting involved.”

27. Give something a miss

This phrase means to deliberately choose not to do or participate in something, often because it’s not appealing or worth the effort.

  • For instance, if someone invites you to a party you’re not interested in, you might say, “I think I’ll give it a miss.”
  • When deciding on an activity, someone might say, “Let’s give the crowded amusement park a miss and go hiking instead.”
  • If someone suggests trying a new restaurant with bad reviews, you might suggest, “I’d give that place a miss if I were you.”

28. Stay clear of

This slang phrase means to avoid or steer away from someone or something, often because it’s dangerous, unpleasant, or unwanted.

  • For example, if there’s a known troublemaker in a group, you might advise, “Stay clear of them.”
  • When discussing potential risks, someone might say, “It’s best to stay clear of that neighborhood at night.”
  • If someone suggests a risky investment, you might caution, “I’d stay clear of that opportunity if I were you.”

29. Keep one’s nose clean

This idiom means to stay out of trouble or avoid engaging in any wrongdoing or illegal activities.

  • For instance, if someone has a history of getting into trouble, you might advise them, “Try to keep your nose clean this time.”
  • When discussing someone who has turned their life around, you might say, “They’ve managed to keep their nose clean and stay on the right path.”
  • If someone is tempted to break the law, you might warn, “It’s not worth it. Keep your nose clean and stay out of trouble.”

30. Give something a wide berth

This phrase means to keep a safe distance from someone or something, often to avoid potential harm or trouble.

  • For example, if there’s a person known for causing conflicts, you might say, “I give them a wide berth.”
  • When discussing a dangerous animal, someone might advise, “It’s best to give it a wide berth and not provoke it.”
  • If someone suggests going to a busy shopping mall during a sale, you might suggest, “Let’s give it a wide berth and try shopping online instead.”

31. Abandon

This term refers to intentionally leaving or deserting someone or something, often without any explanation or consideration. It implies a disregard for responsibility or commitment.

  • For example, “He abandoned his family and disappeared without a trace.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “It’s important not to abandon your partner during difficult times.”
  • A person reflecting on a failed project might admit, “I should have never abandoned that idea; it had so much potential.”

32. Skip out on

This phrase means to intentionally avoid attending or participating in something, often an event or obligation. It implies a desire to evade or escape.

  • For instance, “I decided to skip out on the meeting because I didn’t think it was important.”
  • In a conversation about social gatherings, someone might say, “I usually skip out on parties; they’re just not my thing.”
  • A person discussing responsibilities might confess, “I have a tendency to skip out on chores when I’m feeling lazy.”

33. Bail on

To “bail on” something means to leave abruptly or without warning. It suggests a sudden departure or abandonment of a situation or commitment.

  • For example, “He bailed on the road trip at the last minute, leaving us without a driver.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “I can’t believe she bailed on me when I needed her the most.”
  • A person reflecting on their own behavior might admit, “I have a tendency to bail on plans when I’m feeling overwhelmed.”

34. Brush off

This phrase means to dismiss or ignore someone or something, often in a casual or nonchalant manner. It implies a lack of interest or concern.

  • For instance, “He brushed off her complaints, refusing to address the issue.”
  • In a conversation about customer service, someone might say, “I hate it when employees brush off my concerns.”
  • A person reflecting on their communication style might admit, “I have a tendency to brush off compliments; it’s something I need to work on.”

35. Shake off

To “shake off” something means to get rid of or escape from it, often in a figurative sense. It suggests a desire to distance oneself or break free from a negative or unwanted situation.

  • For example, “She tried to shake off the feeling of sadness by going for a run.”
  • In a discussion about bad habits, someone might say, “It’s difficult to shake off the urge to procrastinate.”
  • A person reflecting on a past mistake might admit, “It took me a long time to shake off the guilt and move on.”

36. Skirt around

This phrase means to avoid or evade a situation or topic, often by talking around it or not directly addressing it. It can also imply avoiding confrontation or conflict.

  • For example, “He tried to skirt around the issue by changing the subject.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Let’s not skirt around the issue, let’s address it head-on.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to maintain peace in your relationship, don’t skirt around important conversations.”

37. Back away from

This phrase means to physically or metaphorically move away from a situation, person, or responsibility in order to avoid it.

  • For instance, “She decided to back away from the project because it was becoming too overwhelming.”
  • In a dangerous situation, someone might yell, “Back away from the edge!”
  • A person might advise, “If a toxic friendship is bringing you down, it’s important to back away from it for your own well-being.”

38. Steer away from

This phrase means to intentionally change direction or take a different path in order to avoid something.

  • For example, “He decided to steer away from the crowded area to find a quieter spot.”
  • In a discussion about unhealthy habits, someone might say, “It’s important to steer away from processed foods and focus on whole, nutritious meals.”
  • A person might advise, “To avoid conflict, it’s best to steer away from sensitive topics during family gatherings.”

39. Opt out of

This phrase means to choose not to participate in something or to decline an opportunity or obligation.

  • For instance, “She decided to opt out of the company’s team-building activity as she preferred to spend her free time differently.”
  • In a discussion about a group project, someone might say, “If you don’t want to contribute, it’s better to opt out than to hinder the progress.”
  • A person might advise, “If a social event doesn’t align with your values or interests, it’s perfectly fine to opt out.”

40. Withdraw from

This phrase means to remove oneself from a situation or relationship in order to avoid further involvement or engagement.

  • For example, “He decided to withdraw from the argument as it was getting heated and unproductive.”
  • In a discussion about a toxic work environment, someone might say, “Sometimes it’s necessary to withdraw from a job that negatively impacts your mental health.”
  • A person might advise, “If a friendship becomes toxic and draining, it’s important to prioritize your well-being and withdraw from it.”

41. Refrain from

This phrase means to consciously choose not to do something or to abstain from a particular action.

  • For example, a doctor might advise, “You should refrain from smoking to improve your health.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Please refrain from talking during the exam.”
  • A friend might say, “I think you should refrain from eating that cake if you’re trying to lose weight.”

42. Steer clear

This colloquial phrase means to deliberately avoid or stay away from someone or something.

  • For instance, a parent might warn their child, “Steer clear of that neighborhood, it’s not safe.”
  • A person might say, “I try to steer clear of drama and conflict.”
  • Someone might advise, “If you want to avoid getting sick, steer clear of crowded places.”

43. Give a wide berth

This expression means to keep a safe distance from someone or something to avoid any potential problems or conflicts.

  • For example, a hiker might say, “I always give a wide berth to snakes I encounter on the trail.”
  • A driver might say, “I give a wide berth to cyclists on the road to ensure their safety.”
  • A person might advise, “It’s best to give a wide berth to gossip and rumors.”

44. Skip

To “skip” something means to intentionally not do or attend a particular activity or event.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’m going to skip class today and go to the beach instead.”
  • Someone might say, “I usually skip breakfast because I’m not hungry in the mornings.”
  • A person might suggest, “Let’s skip the movie and go out for dinner instead.”

45. Repel

In this context, “repel” means to push away or avoid something or someone.

  • For example, a person might say, “I try to repel negative energy and surround myself with positivity.”
  • A hiker might say, “I wear bug spray to repel mosquitoes during my outdoor adventures.”
  • Someone might advise, “To repel unwanted advances, be assertive and set clear boundaries.”

46. Eschew

This word is a more formal way to say “avoid” or “stay away from.” It implies a deliberate choice to avoid or abstain from something.

  • For example, someone might say, “I eschew fast food because I prefer to eat healthy.”
  • In a discussion about sustainable living, a person might mention, “I eschew single-use plastic to reduce waste.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to save money, eschew unnecessary purchases.”

47. Shirk

To shirk means to avoid or neglect one’s responsibilities or duties. It suggests a lack of effort or willingness to fulfill obligations.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Don’t shirk your responsibilities at work; it will reflect poorly on you.”
  • In a conversation about group projects, someone might complain, “I hate it when people shirk their share of the work.”
  • A supervisor might warn, “Employees who consistently shirk their duties will face disciplinary action.”

48. Flee

Flee means to run away or escape from a dangerous or undesirable situation. It implies a sense of urgency or fear.

  • For example, someone might say, “When the fire broke out, we had to flee the building.”
  • In a discussion about a natural disaster, a person might recount, “People had to flee their homes when the hurricane hit.”
  • A character in a thriller novel might think, “I need to flee before the killer finds me.”

49. Ditch

To ditch means to abandon or leave behind something or someone. It suggests a sudden or hasty departure.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I decided to ditch my old car and buy a new one.”
  • In a conversation about a toxic friendship, someone might advise, “You should ditch that person; they’re not good for you.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “Let’s ditch this party and go somewhere else.”

50. Turn away from

To turn away from means to refuse or reject something. It implies a deliberate choice to avoid or reject a particular course of action or belief.

  • For example, someone might say, “I turned away from a career in medicine to pursue my passion for art.”
  • In a discussion about unhealthy habits, a person might share, “I turned away from smoking after realizing its harmful effects.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to live a fulfilling life, turn away from negative influences and surround yourself with positivity.”
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