Top 34 Slang For Bother – Meaning & Usage

Feeling annoyed or irritated? It’s time to level up your slang game and express that feeling of bother in a more trendy and relatable way. Our team has rounded up the coolest and most current slang terms for bother that will have you speaking the language of today’s youth in no time. Say goodbye to outdated expressions and hello to a whole new world of linguistic flair!

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1. Annoy

To “annoy” someone means to bother or irritate them. It refers to actions or behaviors that cause frustration or inconvenience.

  • For example, “Stop tapping your pencil, it’s starting to annoy me.”
  • A person might say, “His constant complaining is really annoying.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “It’s so annoying when people talk loudly on their phones in public.”

2. Bug

To “bug” someone means to pester or annoy them persistently. It refers to actions or behaviors that are bothersome or intrusive.

  • For instance, “Please stop bugging me, I need some quiet time.”
  • A person might say, “My little sister always bugs me to play with her.”
  • Someone might comment, “The constant notifications from this app are really bugging me.”

3. Nuisance

A “nuisance” refers to something or someone that is annoying, bothersome, or causing inconvenience.

  • For example, “The construction noise outside my window is such a nuisance.”
  • A person might say, “Mosquitoes are such a nuisance during the summer.”
  • Someone might complain, “The constant spam emails are a nuisance in my inbox.”

4. Pest

A “pest” is someone who is annoying, bothersome, or troublesome. It can refer to a person who is constantly bothering or irritating others.

  • For instance, “He’s such a pest, always asking for favors.”
  • A person might say, “My little brother can be a real pest sometimes.”
  • Someone might comment, “The telemarketers calling multiple times a day are such pests.”

5. Irritate

To “irritate” someone means to provoke or annoy them, typically through actions, words, or behaviors that cause frustration or annoyance.

  • For example, “The constant loud chewing irritates me.”
  • A person might say, “Her constant interruptions during meetings are really irritating.”
  • Someone might post, “The slow internet connection is really irritating me right now.”

6. Aggravate

To cause irritation or annoyance to someone. “Aggravate” is often used to describe actions or behaviors that intensify a person’s annoyance.

  • For example, “Stop tapping your pencil, it’s starting to aggravate me.”
  • A person might say, “His constant bragging aggravates everyone in the office.”
  • In a discussion about pet peeves, someone might mention, “People who chew loudly really aggravate me.”

7. Harass

To persistently annoy or intimidate someone, often with the intention of causing distress or harm. “Harass” is commonly used to describe actions such as stalking, threatening, or repeatedly contacting someone without their consent.

  • For instance, “She filed a complaint against her coworker for harassing her.”
  • A person might say, “My neighbor’s dog constantly barks and harasses everyone in the building.”
  • In a discussion about online behavior, someone might mention, “Trolling and harassing others is never acceptable.”

8. Vex

To cause someone to feel annoyed, frustrated, or worried. “Vex” often implies a sense of irritation or provocation.

  • For example, “The constant noise from the construction site vexes the residents.”
  • A person might say, “He always finds a way to vex me with his sarcastic remarks.”
  • In a discussion about daily annoyances, someone might mention, “Being stuck in traffic really vexes me.”

9. Disturb

To interrupt or intrude upon someone’s peace, quiet, or normal functioning. “Disturb” can refer to physical or emotional disruptions, often causing a sense of unease or discomfort.

  • For instance, “Please do not disturb me while I’m working.”
  • A person might say, “The loud music from the party disturbed the neighbors.”
  • In a discussion about personal boundaries, someone might mention, “It’s important to respect others’ privacy and not disturb them unnecessarily.”

10. Rile

To deliberately or unintentionally anger or irritate someone. “Rile” is often used to describe actions or behaviors that incite a strong emotional reaction.

  • For example, “His constant teasing really riles me up.”
  • A person might say, “She knows how to rile him by bringing up sensitive topics.”
  • In a discussion about sibling dynamics, someone might mention, “My brother always knows how to rile me up during family gatherings.”

11. Plague

To constantly bother or irritate someone.

  • For example, “My little brother always plagues me with his questions.”
  • A person might say, “The mosquitoes are plaguing me all night.”
  • In a complaint about a coworker, one might say, “He constantly plagues me with his loud music.”

12. Hound

To persistently bother or harass someone.

  • For instance, “Stop hounding me about finishing the project.”
  • A person might say, “My boss hounds me with endless demands.”
  • In a conversation about a clingy ex, one might say, “He won’t stop hounding me with calls and messages.”

13. Trouble

To cause inconvenience or annoyance to someone.

  • For example, “Sorry to trouble you, but could you help me with this?”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to trouble you, but I need a favor.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult situation, one might say, “I’m in a bit of trouble and could use some advice.”

14. Tease

To playfully bother or make fun of someone.

  • For instance, “Don’t tease your sister, it’s not nice.”
  • A person might say, “He always teases me about my fashion choices.”
  • In a conversation about childhood memories, one might say, “We used to tease each other mercilessly on the playground.”

15. Ruffle

To bother or unsettle someone’s composure or calmness.

  • For example, “His rude comment really ruffled her.”
  • A person might say, “The unexpected news really ruffled me.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult interaction, one might say, “I tried not to let her words ruffle me, but it was hard.”

16. Rattle

To irritate or disturb someone or something. “Rattle” is often used to describe a persistent or nagging form of bother.

  • For example, “The loud construction noise rattled me while I was trying to work.”
  • A person might say, “The constant ringing of the phone is starting to rattle my nerves.”
  • In a discussion about annoying habits, someone might mention, “People who chew with their mouths open really rattle me.”

17. Chafe

To cause irritation or discomfort, either physically or emotionally. “Chafe” is often used to describe a bothersome or aggravating situation.

  • For instance, “The rough fabric of the shirt chafed against my skin.”
  • A person might say, “The constant criticism from my boss really chafes me.”
  • In a discussion about irritating rules, someone might mention, “The strict dress code at my school really chafes the students.”

18. Fret

To feel anxious, stressed, or concerned about something. “Fret” is often used to describe a bothersome or troubling feeling.

  • For example, “I fret about my upcoming exams.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t fret about the small stuff; it’s not worth it.”
  • In a discussion about parenting, someone might mention, “Parents often fret about their children’s safety.”

19. Rankle

To cause persistent irritation or resentment. “Rankle” is often used to describe a bothersome or lingering feeling of annoyance.

  • For instance, “His rude comment really rankled me.”
  • A person might say, “The unfair treatment of employees continues to rankle the staff.”
  • In a discussion about unresolved conflicts, someone might mention, “The unresolved issue between them still rankles years later.”

20. Chivvy

To repeatedly annoy or pester someone. “Chivvy” is often used to describe a bothersome or persistent form of nagging.

  • For example, “My mother always chivvies me about cleaning my room.”
  • A person might say, “Stop chivvying me! I’ll get it done eventually.”
  • In a discussion about annoying habits, someone might mention, “People who constantly chivvy others to do things can be quite irritating.”

21. Goad

To goad someone means to deliberately annoy or provoke them, often with the intention of getting a reaction out of them.

  • For example, “Stop goading your brother, it’s not fair.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “Don’t goad me into saying something I’ll regret.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “I won’t tolerate you goading your sister like that.”

22. Hassle

A hassle refers to a situation or task that is annoying, burdensome, or difficult to deal with.

  • For instance, “Dealing with customer service can be such a hassle.”
  • If someone complains about their job, they might say, “I can’t stand all the hassles that come with this position.”
  • When discussing travel, a person might say, “Getting through airport security is always a hassle.”

23. Pester

To pester someone means to annoy or bother them persistently, often by repeatedly asking for something or demanding attention.

  • For example, “Please stop pestering me, I’ll get to it when I can.”
  • A child might pester their parent for a new toy, saying, “Can I have it? Can I have it? Can I have it?”
  • If someone is constantly sending messages or calling, you might say, “They won’t stop pestering me.”

24. Irk

To irk someone means to irritate or annoy them, often by doing or saying something that bothers them.

  • For instance, “The sound of nails on a chalkboard really irks me.”
  • If someone constantly interrupts you, you might say, “Their behavior really irks me.”
  • When discussing pet peeves, a person might say, “People who chew with their mouth open really irk me.”

25. Botheration

Botheration refers to the state of being annoyed or irritated by something or someone.

  • For example, “I can’t stand all this botheration, I just want some peace and quiet.”
  • If someone complains about a difficult task, they might say, “It’s such a botheration to deal with all these paperwork.”
  • When discussing a frustrating situation, a person might say, “I’m tired of all the botheration at work.”

26. Disquiet

Disquiet refers to a feeling of unease or anxiety. It is often used to describe a state of restlessness or mental agitation.

  • For example, “The constant noise from the construction site caused a great deal of disquiet among the residents.”
  • A person might say, “The disquiet in the room was palpable as everyone waited for the test results.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might express, “The current state of affairs is causing a great deal of disquiet among the population.”

27. Faze

Faze means to disturb or unsettle someone. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is caught off guard or thrown off balance.

  • For instance, “No matter what they threw at her, nothing seemed to faze her.”
  • In a conversation about facing challenges, someone might say, “I’m not easily fazed by obstacles.”
  • A person might express, “The unexpected turn of events didn’t faze him at all.”

28. Discommode

Discommode means to cause inconvenience or trouble to someone. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is put out or inconvenienced.

  • For example, “I hope I’m not discommoding you by asking for a ride.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “The delay in the flight really discommodated us.”
  • A person might express, “I don’t want to discommode you, but could you help me with this task?”

29. Exasperate

Exasperate means to irritate or annoy someone to the point of frustration. It is often used to describe a situation where someone’s patience is tested.

  • For instance, “Her constant complaining really exasperated me.”
  • In a conversation about difficult coworkers, someone might say, “He always finds a way to exasperate everyone in the office.”
  • A person might express, “I try not to let small things exasperate me, but sometimes it’s hard.”

30. Miff

Miff means to annoy or irritate someone. It is often used to describe a situation where someone feels slighted or offended.

  • For example, “Her comment about my outfit really miffed me.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Little things like forgetting special occasions can miff your partner.”
  • A person might express, “I try not to let things miff me, but sometimes it’s hard to ignore.”

31. Vexation

Vexation refers to a feeling of annoyance or frustration. It describes a state of being bothered or irritated by someone or something.

  • For example, “The constant noise from the construction site was a source of vexation for the residents.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand the vexation of dealing with rude customers.”
  • In a discussion about pet peeves, someone might mention, “Slow walkers are a major source of vexation for me.”

32. Grate

Grate means to irritate or annoy someone. It describes a feeling of being bothered or frustrated by someone’s actions or behavior.

  • For instance, “His constant whistling really grates on my nerves.”
  • A person might say, “The way she chews her food loudly really grates on me.”
  • In a conversation about annoying habits, someone might mention, “People who talk loudly on their cell phones in public places really grate on my nerves.”

33. Mither

Mither is a slang term that means to bother or annoy someone. It describes the act of repeatedly nagging or pestering someone.

  • For example, “Stop mithering me about cleaning my room.”
  • A person might say, “I wish my siblings would stop mithering me for money.”
  • In a discussion about annoying co-workers, someone might mention, “She’s always mithering me with unnecessary questions.”

34. Nark

Nark is a slang term that means to bother or annoy someone. It describes the act of causing trouble or creating a hassle for someone.

  • For instance, “Don’t nark me about being late; I had a valid reason.”
  • A person might say, “The boss is always narking us about meeting deadlines.”
  • In a conversation about difficult customers, someone might mention, “Dealing with rude customers can be a real nark.”
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