Top 43 Slang For Injustices – Meaning & Usage

In a world where injustices run rampant, it’s important to have the language to articulate and address these issues. Our team has compiled a list of powerful and poignant slang terms that capture the essence of injustice in various forms. From microaggressions to systemic discrimination, this listicle will equip you with the words needed to navigate and discuss these challenging topics with confidence and clarity.

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1. Hoodwinked

To be hoodwinked means to be deceived or tricked, often in a clever or sneaky way.

  • For example, “He thought he was getting a great deal, but he was actually being hoodwinked.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Don’t let yourself be hoodwinked by promises of easy money.”
  • A person might feel frustrated and say, “I can’t believe I was hoodwinked into buying a faulty product.”

2. Conned

To be conned means to be scammed or swindled, usually out of money or valuables, by someone who gains your trust or manipulates you through deception.

  • For instance, “She was conned into giving away her life savings to a fake charity.”
  • In a conversation about online scams, someone might say, “Watch out for phishing emails trying to con you out of your personal information.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Don’t fall for that scam, they’re just trying to con you.”

3. Victimized

To be victimized means to be made a victim of a wrongdoing or injustice, often by someone who takes advantage of your vulnerability or lack of power.

  • For example, “She felt victimized by the unfair treatment she received at work.”
  • In a discussion about discrimination, someone might say, “Minority communities have been historically victimized by systemic racism.”
  • A person might share their experience and say, “I was victimized by a pickpocket while traveling abroad.”

4. Fleeced

To be fleeced means to be cheated or ripped off, often in a financial sense, by someone who takes advantage of your trust or naivety.

  • For instance, “They charged me double the price for a simple repair. I feel like I’ve been fleeced.”
  • In a conversation about unfair pricing, someone might say, “Don’t let yourself be fleeced by overpriced products.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I can’t believe I was fleeced by that dishonest salesperson.”

5. Screwed

To be screwed means to be betrayed or treated unfairly, often in a way that causes significant harm or disadvantage.

  • For example, “He was screwed over by his business partner, who took all the profits for himself.”
  • In a discussion about workplace mistreatment, someone might say, “Employees often feel screwed by companies that prioritize profits over their well-being.”
  • A person might vent their frustration by saying, “I can’t believe I got screwed by my own family member.”

6. Jipped

This term is used to describe being deceived or cheated out of something, often in a dishonest or unfair manner.

  • For example, “I paid for a brand new phone, but I got jipped and received a broken one.”
  • In a discussion about unfair business practices, someone might say, “Consumers often feel jipped when companies falsely advertise their products.”
  • Another example could be, “He promised to pay me back, but I got jipped and never received the money.”

7. Gipped

Similar to “jipped,” this term refers to being tricked or deceived, often resulting in a loss of money or resources.

  • For instance, “I thought I was getting a great deal, but I got gipped and paid way more than the item was worth.”
  • In a conversation about scams, someone might say, “Many people fall victim to online scams and end up getting gipped out of their hard-earned money.”
  • Another example could be, “She promised to deliver the goods, but I got gipped and never received them.”

8. Snookered

To be “snookered” means to be put in a difficult or disadvantageous position, often due to the actions of others.

  • For example, “I was snookered into signing a contract with unfavorable terms.”
  • In a discussion about unfair tactics, someone might say, “The company snookered their competitors by undercutting prices.”
  • Another example could be, “He thought he had the upper hand, but he was snookered by a clever negotiation tactic.”

9. Bilked

This term refers to being cheated or defrauded out of money or assets, often through deceptive or dishonest means.

  • For instance, “He was bilked out of his life savings by a fraudulent investment scheme.”
  • In a conversation about financial scams, someone might say, “Many people fall victim to being bilked by online phishing scams.”
  • Another example could be, “She thought she was getting a great deal, but she was bilked and received a counterfeit product.”

10. Coerced

To be “coerced” means to be compelled or pressured into doing something against one’s will, often through threats or intimidation.

  • For example, “He was coerced into signing the contract under duress.”
  • In a discussion about abusive relationships, someone might say, “Victims often feel coerced into staying with their abusers due to fear.”
  • Another example could be, “She was coerced into giving false testimony by the intimidating presence of the defendant’s lawyer.”

11. Exploited

This term refers to being used or manipulated for someone else’s gain, often in a way that is unfair or unethical.

  • For example, “The workers were exploited by their employer, who paid them below minimum wage.”
  • In a discussion about labor rights, someone might say, “Companies should not be allowed to exploit their employees.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I felt exploited by my landlord, who raised the rent without any notice.”

12. Oppressed

This term describes a situation where a group or individual is subjected to unjust treatment, discrimination, or control, often by those in power.

  • For instance, “Throughout history, marginalized communities have been oppressed by those in positions of authority.”
  • In a conversation about social justice, someone might say, “It’s important to fight against systems that oppress certain groups.”
  • A person sharing their personal story might say, “I grew up in an oppressed community, where opportunities were limited.”

13. Discriminated

This term refers to the unjust or prejudicial treatment of individuals or groups based on factors such as race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation.

  • For example, “People of color have long been discriminated against in various aspects of society.”
  • In a discussion about equal rights, someone might say, “We need to address the systemic discrimination that exists in our institutions.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I’ve faced discrimination in the workplace because of my disability.”

14. Rip-off

This term describes a situation where someone is cheated or deceived by paying too much for a product or service that is of poor quality or not worth the price.

  • For instance, “That expensive designer bag turned out to be a rip-off, as it fell apart after just a few uses.”
  • In a conversation about consumer rights, someone might say, “Consumers should be protected from rip-offs and scams.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I bought a used car that turned out to be a complete rip-off, as it constantly broke down.”

15. Gouged

This term refers to being charged an exorbitant or unfair price for a product or service, often taking advantage of a person’s need or vulnerability.

  • For example, “During a natural disaster, some businesses may gouge prices on essential items like water and food.”
  • In a discussion about price gouging, someone might say, “Laws should be in place to protect consumers from being gouged during emergencies.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I felt gouged by the high prices of medical treatments, which were unaffordable for many.”

16. Ripped apart

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone or something is severely criticized or attacked, causing significant damage or harm.

  • For example, “The journalist’s article was ripped apart by critics for its biased reporting.”
  • In a political debate, one candidate might say, “My opponent’s policies would rip apart our economy.”
  • A person discussing a breakup might say, “After the breakup, I felt like my heart was ripped apart.”

17. Deceived

To be deceived means to be misled or tricked into believing something that is not true or to be manipulated into doing something against one’s best interest.

  • For instance, “The salesman deceived me into buying a faulty product.”
  • In a relationship, one person might say, “I feel deceived after discovering my partner’s infidelity.”
  • A person discussing a scam might warn, “Be careful not to be deceived by offers that seem too good to be true.”

18. Misled

To be misled means to be given incorrect or false information that causes one to make a wrong decision or take the wrong action.

  • For example, “The politician misled the public with false promises.”
  • In a legal case, one might argue, “The witness was misled by the prosecution’s leading questions.”
  • A person discussing a misleading advertisement might say, “The company misled consumers with exaggerated claims about their product.”

19. Betrayed

To be betrayed means to have someone break one’s trust or loyalty, often by acting against one’s best interest or revealing confidential information.

  • For instance, “I felt betrayed when my best friend started dating my ex.”
  • In a business partnership, one might say, “My partner betrayed me by stealing our clients.”
  • A person discussing a betrayal of trust might warn, “Be careful who you confide in to avoid being betrayed.”

20. Mistreated

To be mistreated means to be subjected to unfair or cruel treatment, often resulting in physical, emotional, or psychological harm.

  • For example, “The employees were mistreated by their abusive boss.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, one might say, “No one should be mistreated based on their race, gender, or religion.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was mistreated by the police during a routine traffic stop.”

21. Burned

To be “burned” means to be deceived or treated unfairly. It implies a sense of betrayal or being taken advantage of.

  • For example, “I can’t believe he burned me by stealing my idea and claiming it as his own.”
  • In a discussion about a dishonest business deal, someone might say, “The customers got burned by the company’s false advertising.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I feel burned by the system that is supposed to protect us.”

22. Gypped

To be “gypped” means to be cheated or swindled out of something, often money or a fair deal. The term is derived from the word “gypsy,” which historically has been associated with trickery or dishonesty.

  • For instance, “I feel like I got gypped when I bought this counterfeit product.”
  • In a conversation about a rigged game, someone might say, “The players were gypped out of their chance to win.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Be careful not to get gypped by those shady salesmen.”

23. Disadvantaged

To be “disadvantaged” means to be in a position of social or economic disadvantage, often due to factors beyond one’s control. It refers to a lack of opportunities or resources that others may have.

  • For example, “Children from disadvantaged backgrounds often face more obstacles in accessing quality education.”
  • In a discussion about systemic inequalities, someone might say, “The current policies perpetuate the cycle of disadvantage for marginalized communities.”
  • A person might advocate for equal opportunities by saying, “We need to address the root causes of disadvantage in our society.”

24. Slighted

To feel “slighted” means to feel ignored, overlooked, or undervalued by others. It implies a sense of disrespect or disregard for one’s feelings or worth.

  • For instance, “I felt slighted when my ideas were dismissed without consideration.”
  • In a conversation about being excluded from a social event, someone might say, “I can’t help but feel slighted by their deliberate omission.”
  • A person might express their disappointment by saying, “I feel slighted by the lack of recognition for my hard work.”

25. Snubbed

To be “snubbed” means to be deliberately ignored or rejected by someone, often as a form of disrespect or disdain. It implies a deliberate action to exclude or disregard another person.

  • For example, “She snubbed me by walking past without acknowledging my presence.”
  • In a discussion about social interactions, someone might say, “Being snubbed by your peers can be a blow to your self-esteem.”
  • A person might recount a personal experience by saying, “I was snubbed by the hiring manager during the job interview process.”

26. Unjustly treated

This refers to being treated in a way that is not fair or just. It implies that someone has been subjected to unfair or biased actions or behaviors.

  • For example, “She was unjustly treated by her employer and unfairly terminated.”
  • In a discussion about discrimination, someone might say, “Minorities are often unjustly treated in our society.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was unjustly treated by the police during a routine traffic stop.”

27. Ill-treated

This term refers to being treated poorly or in a harmful manner. It suggests that someone has been subjected to abusive or neglectful actions.

  • For instance, “The child was ill-treated by their parents and suffered emotional trauma.”
  • In a conversation about animal rights, someone might say, “Many animals are ill-treated in factory farms.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was ill-treated by my former partner and endured physical abuse.”

28. Unfairly disadvantaged

This phrase describes a situation where someone is placed at a disadvantage or deprived of opportunities or resources in a way that is not just or equitable.

  • For example, “Students from low-income families are unfairly disadvantaged in the education system.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, someone might say, “Certain racial and ethnic groups are unfairly disadvantaged in our society.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was unfairly disadvantaged in the job application process due to my disability.”

29. Unjustly accused

This term refers to being accused of something without evidence or justification. It implies that someone has been wrongly blamed or held responsible for an action or behavior.

  • For instance, “He was unjustly accused of stealing the money when there was no proof.”
  • In a conversation about wrongful convictions, someone might say, “Many innocent people have been unjustly accused and imprisoned.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was unjustly accused of cheating on the exam even though I didn’t.”

30. Unjust verdict

This phrase describes a verdict or decision in a legal case that is considered to be unfair or lacking in justice. It suggests that the outcome of the case was not based on a fair evaluation of the evidence or circumstances.

  • For example, “The family was devastated by the unjust verdict that acquitted the perpetrator.”
  • In a discussion about the flaws in the legal system, someone might say, “There have been many cases where an unjust verdict has been handed down.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I witnessed an unjust verdict in a trial where the evidence clearly pointed to the defendant’s innocence.”

31. Unjust sentence

This refers to a decision made by a court or judge that is considered to be unfair or incorrect. An unjust sentence can result in someone being punished or imprisoned for a crime they did not commit or being given a punishment that is too harsh.

  • For example, “The innocent man was given an unjust sentence of life in prison.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might say, “We need to address the issue of unjust sentences in our legal system.”
  • A news article might highlight a case of an unjust sentence, stating, “The wrongful conviction and unjust sentence of an innocent man has sparked outrage.”

32. Unjust ruling

This refers to a decision made by a judge or court that is considered to be unfair or biased. An unjust ruling can occur in various legal contexts, such as civil cases, criminal cases, or administrative hearings.

  • For instance, “The unjust ruling favored the wealthy corporation over the rights of the workers.”
  • In a discussion about the legal system, someone might argue, “We need to address the issue of unjust rulings that disproportionately impact marginalized communities.”
  • A news headline might read, “Critics denounce the unjust ruling as a violation of civil rights.”

33. Unjust treatment

This refers to actions or behaviors that are considered to be unfair or discriminatory. Unjust treatment can occur in various contexts, such as in the workplace, in relationships, or within institutions.

  • For example, “The employee experienced unjust treatment due to their race.”
  • In a conversation about social justice, someone might say, “We must address the systemic issues that lead to unjust treatment.”
  • An article about gender inequality might discuss examples of unjust treatment towards women, stating, “These instances of unjust treatment perpetuate gender disparities.”

34. Unjust action

This refers to actions or behaviors that are considered to be unfair, unjust, or morally wrong. Unjust actions can range from individual acts of discrimination to systemic injustices perpetuated by institutions or governments.

  • For instance, “The government’s decision to cut funding for public education is an unjust action.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might argue, “We must condemn any unjust actions that violate the rights of individuals.”
  • A news report might highlight an unjust action, stating, “The police officer’s use of excessive force was deemed an unjust action.”

35. Unjust behavior

This refers to conduct or actions that are considered to be unfair, unethical, or morally wrong. Unjust behavior can occur in various settings, such as interpersonal relationships, professional environments, or societal structures.

  • For example, “The supervisor’s favoritism towards certain employees is an example of unjust behavior.”
  • In a conversation about social inequality, someone might say, “We need to address the underlying systems that perpetuate unjust behavior.”
  • An opinion piece might critique unjust behavior within the corporate world, stating, “The prevalence of unethical practices highlights the need for greater accountability.”

36. Unjust practice

This term refers to any action or behavior that is considered unfair or unjust. It can encompass a wide range of behaviors that go against principles of fairness or equality.

  • For example, “The company’s unjust practice of paying women less than men for the same work sparked outrage.”
  • In a discussion about workplace discrimination, someone might say, “We need to address the unjust practices that are keeping marginalized groups from advancing.”
  • A social justice advocate might argue, “We must challenge and dismantle the unjust practices that perpetuate inequality.”

37. Unjust system

This term refers to a system or structure that is considered unfair or unjust. It can refer to political, economic, or social systems that perpetuate inequality or discrimination.

  • For instance, “The criminal justice system is often criticized for its unjust treatment of marginalized communities.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “We need to address the unjust system that allows the rich to get richer while the poor struggle.”
  • A social activist might argue, “We must work towards dismantling the unjust systems that perpetuate oppression and discrimination.”

38. Unjust policy

This term refers to a rule or regulation that is considered unfair or unjust. It can refer to policies implemented by governments, organizations, or institutions that result in unequal treatment or disadvantage certain groups.

  • For example, “The immigration policy was deemed unjust as it separated families and violated human rights.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might say, “We need to address the unjust policies that perpetuate educational inequity.”
  • A human rights advocate might argue, “We must advocate for the repeal of unjust policies that infringe upon people’s rights.”

39. Unjust law

This term refers to a law or statute that is considered unfair or unjust. It can refer to laws that discriminate against certain groups, violate human rights, or perpetuate inequality.

  • For instance, “The Jim Crow laws were widely recognized as unjust and discriminatory.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might say, “We need to challenge and change the unjust laws that disproportionately target marginalized communities.”
  • A civil rights activist might argue, “We must fight for the repeal of unjust laws that deny people their basic rights.”

40. Unjust government

This term refers to a government or ruling body that is considered unfair or unjust. It can refer to governments that engage in corruption, oppression, or discrimination against their own citizens.

  • For example, “The dictator’s regime was known for its unjust treatment of political dissidents.”
  • In a discussion about human rights violations, someone might say, “We need to hold unjust governments accountable for their actions.”
  • A democracy advocate might argue, “We must strive for a just and transparent government that serves the needs of all its citizens.”

41. Unjust situation

This term refers to a situation or circumstance that is considered unfair or unjust. It highlights the imbalance or lack of justice in a particular scenario.

  • For example, “Being denied a promotion despite being the most qualified candidate is an unjust situation.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “The widening wealth gap is a prime example of an unjust situation.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “Growing up in a household with unequal treatment between siblings was an unjust situation.”

42. Unjust process

This phrase describes a process or procedure that is considered unfair or unjust. It emphasizes the lack of fairness or equity in the steps taken to reach a certain outcome.

  • For instance, “A trial that doesn’t allow for proper representation is an unjust process.”
  • In a discussion about legal systems, someone might argue, “The reliance on plea bargains can lead to unjust processes.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “Going through a divorce with a biased judge was an unjust process.”

43. Unjust environment

This term refers to an environment or setting that is considered unfair or unjust. It highlights the lack of fairness or equity in the conditions or atmosphere.

  • For example, “A workplace that tolerates discrimination creates an unjust environment.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “Living in a society that perpetuates systemic racism fosters an unjust environment.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “Growing up in a neighborhood with unequal access to resources was an unjust environment.”
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