Top 49 Slang For Check In – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to social media and travel, knowing the latest slang for check in can keep you ahead of the game. Whether you’re updating your status or announcing your arrival, staying in the loop with these trendy phrases is a must. Let’s take a deep dive into the world of check-ins and explore the coolest ways to let your friends know where you’re at.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Touch base

To “touch base” means to make contact or communicate with someone, usually to get an update or exchange information.

  • For example, “Let’s touch base tomorrow to discuss the project.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “I need to touch base with my team to see how the project is progressing.”
  • A friend might suggest, “We haven’t caught up in a while, let’s touch base over coffee.”

2. Pop in

To “pop in” means to visit someone briefly or unexpectedly, often without prior notice.

  • For instance, “I’m just going to pop in and say hello to my friend.”
  • If someone unexpectedly shows up at your house, you might say, “Oh, I didn’t expect you to pop in!”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can I pop in for a quick chat about the upcoming meeting?”

3. Drop a line

To “drop a line” means to send a message or contact someone, usually through written communication such as email or text.

  • For example, “I’ll drop you a line later to discuss the details.”
  • If you haven’t heard from a friend in a while, you might say, “Why don’t you drop me a line and let me know how you’re doing?”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can you drop me a line with the latest updates on the project?”

4. Check up on

To “check up on” someone means to inquire about their well-being or progress, often to ensure they are doing okay or to gather information.

  • For instance, “I’m going to check up on my mom to see how she’s feeling.”
  • If someone hasn’t been feeling well, you might say, “I’ll check up on you later to see if you need anything.”
  • A supervisor might ask, “Can you check up on the team and make sure they’re on track with their tasks?”

5. Report in

To “report in” means to provide an update or status on a situation or task, usually to a superior or authority figure.

  • For example, “I need everyone to report in on their progress by the end of the day.”
  • If you’re part of a team working on a project, you might say, “Let’s all report in during the weekly meeting.”
  • A manager might ask, “Can you report in on the results of the marketing campaign?”

6. Touch down

This slang term is often used to indicate that someone has arrived at a specific location.

  • For example, “Just touched down at the airport, can’t wait to start my vacation!”
  • A person might text their friend, “Hey, I just touched down in the city, let’s meet up.”
  • When someone asks where you are, you can respond with, “I touched down at the hotel a few minutes ago.”

7. Check out

This phrase is commonly used to indicate that someone is leaving a place or situation.

  • For instance, “I’m going to check out of the hotel tomorrow morning.”
  • If you’re at a party and want to leave, you can say, “I think it’s time for me to check out.”
  • When someone asks if you’re ready to go, you can respond with, “Yeah, let’s check out of here.”

8. Check on

This slang term means to inquire about someone’s well-being or to make sure they are okay.

  • For example, “I’m going to check on my grandma to see how she’s doing.”
  • If a friend is sick, you might text them, “Just wanted to check on you and see if you need anything.”
  • When someone is upset, you can ask, “Can I check on you and see if you’re feeling better?”

9. Catch up

This phrase is often used to describe the act of meeting or talking with someone to find out what has been happening in their life.

  • For instance, “Let’s grab coffee and catch up on everything that’s been going on.”
  • If you haven’t seen a friend in a while, you might say, “We need to catch up soon, it’s been too long.”
  • When someone asks how your weekend was, you can say, “I caught up with some old friends and had a great time.”

10. Holler at

This slang term means to get in touch with someone or to reach out to them.

  • For example, “Holler at me when you’re free and we can make plans.”
  • If you want to talk to a friend, you can say, “I’ll holler at you later.”
  • When someone asks how to get in touch with you, you can say, “Just holler at me on social media and we can chat.”

11. Hit up

This phrase is often used to indicate contacting someone, usually with the intention of meeting up or checking in on them.

  • For example, “I’ll hit up my friend and see if they want to grab dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I hit up my mom to let her know I arrived safely.”
  • Another usage could be, “I need to hit up my boss and ask about my schedule for next week.”

This phrase is used to express the act of meeting or connecting with someone, often in a social context.

  • For instance, “Let’s link up for coffee and catch up.”
  • Two friends might say, “We should link up this weekend and go hiking.”
  • A person might ask, “When are we going to link up and work on that project?”

13. Check in with

This phrase is used to indicate the act of communicating or updating someone about one’s current status or situation.

  • For example, “I need to check in with my supervisor and let them know how the project is going.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll check in with my friends and see if they want to join us.”
  • Another usage could be, “Don’t forget to check in with your family and let them know you’re safe.”

14. Keep in touch

This phrase is used to express the desire or intention to maintain communication or stay connected with someone.

  • For instance, “We should exchange numbers and keep in touch.”
  • A person might say, “Even though we’re moving to different cities, let’s make an effort to keep in touch.”
  • Two friends might promise, “No matter where life takes us, we’ll always keep in touch.”

15. Check on in

This phrase is used to indicate the act of ensuring someone’s well-being or safety by checking in on them.

  • For example, “I’ll check on in my elderly neighbor to make sure she’s doing okay.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll check on in my friend who’s going through a tough time.”
  • Another usage could be, “Don’t forget to check on in your loved ones and see how they’re doing.”

16. Check back

This phrase is used when someone wants to know if there are any updates or new information regarding a specific topic or situation. It implies that the person will come back at a later time to check for updates.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’ll check back with you later to see if you’ve made a decision.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you check back on that report and see if there are any errors?”
  • A customer might inquire, “When should I check back to see if the item is back in stock?”

17. Check over

This term is used when someone wants to carefully examine or review something for accuracy, completeness, or any potential issues.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Make sure to check over your answers before submitting the test.”
  • In a home renovation project, a contractor might advise, “I’ll check over the blueprints to ensure everything is in order.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Let me check over your homework to make sure it’s done correctly.”

18. Check through

This phrase is used when someone wants to thoroughly examine or review something, usually with the intention of finding errors, inconsistencies, or any other issues.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “I need to check through the documents before the trial begins.”
  • When proofreading a document, someone might say, “I’ll check through the manuscript for any grammatical errors.”
  • A supervisor might instruct an employee, “Please check through the inventory to ensure everything is accounted for.”

19. Check upon

This term is used when someone wants to monitor or inspect a person, place, or situation to ensure everything is in order or to show concern for someone’s well-being.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “I’ll check upon the progress of the project later this week.”
  • If someone is feeling unwell, a friend might ask, “I just wanted to check upon you. How are you feeling?”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I’ll check upon you while you’re studying to make sure you’re focused.”

20. Check around

This phrase is used when someone wants to gather information or explore different options before making a decision or taking action.

  • For example, if someone is looking for a new apartment, they might say, “I’ll check around to see if there are any better deals.”
  • When planning a vacation, someone might say, “Let’s check around for the best flight prices.”
  • If someone is considering buying a new car, they might say, “I’ll check around at different dealerships to compare prices.”

21. Check out on

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is leaving a location or ending their involvement in something.

  • For example, “I’m going to check out on this project and focus on something else.”
  • In a hotel, a guest might say, “I need to check out on Sunday morning.”
  • A person leaving a party might announce, “I’m going to check out on the festivities and head home.”

22. Check through with

This phrase is used to express the act of following through and completing a task or action.

  • For instance, “I need to check through with my team before making a final decision.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might ask, “Did you check through with all the necessary steps?”
  • A person discussing their to-do list might say, “I have a few more tasks to check through with before the end of the day.”

23. Check in for

This phrase is commonly used when someone arrives at a location and needs to announce their presence or register their attendance.

  • For example, “I need to check in for my flight at the airport.”
  • In a hotel, a guest might say, “I’d like to check in for my reservation.”
  • A person attending a conference might announce, “I’m here to check in for the event.”

24. Check out from

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is leaving a location or ending their involvement in something.

  • For instance, “I need to check out from this hotel and head home.”
  • In a discussion about a job, someone might say, “I decided to check out from my current position and pursue a new opportunity.”
  • A person leaving a party might announce, “I’m going to check out from the gathering and call it a night.”

25. Check up with

This phrase is often used to express the act of checking in on someone or something to get an update or ensure everything is going well.

  • For example, “I need to check up with my doctor to see how my recovery is progressing.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might ask, “Did you check up with the team to see if they need any support?”
  • A person discussing a friend’s well-being might say, “I should check up with them to see how they’re doing.”

26. Check in at

This phrase is often used when someone arrives at a specific place and notifies others of their presence.

  • For example, “I’ll check in at the hotel and then meet you for dinner.”
  • When attending an event, someone might say, “Don’t forget to check in at the registration desk.”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “Just checked in at the airport, ready for my vacation!”

27. Clock in

This term is commonly used in work settings to indicate the action of starting one’s shift or officially beginning work.

  • For instance, “I need to clock in before I can begin my tasks.”
  • A supervisor might remind employees, “Don’t forget to clock in when you arrive.”
  • A coworker might ask, “What time did you clock in this morning?”

28. Sign in

This phrase is often used to indicate the action of officially registering one’s presence or attendance at a particular place or event.

  • For example, “Please sign in at the front desk before entering the building.”
  • A teacher might ask students, “Don’t forget to sign in when you arrive for class.”
  • A participant at a conference might be instructed, “Make sure to sign in at the registration booth.”

29. Check up

This term is commonly used to refer to a medical appointment or examination that is conducted to assess one’s health or progress.

  • For instance, “I have a check-up with my doctor next week.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “It’s time for your annual check-up.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to schedule a check-up with my dentist.”

30. Drop by

This phrase is often used to indicate the action of visiting someone or a location without a prior appointment or formal arrangement.

  • For example, “I’ll drop by your house later to say hello.”
  • A friend might text, “I’m in the neighborhood, can I drop by for a quick chat?”
  • Someone might invite others by saying, “Feel free to drop by the office anytime.”

31. Roll call

This term refers to the process of calling out names or taking attendance to ensure that everyone is present. It is commonly used in school or military settings.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s start with roll call to see who’s here.”
  • In a military training exercise, a sergeant might conduct a roll call before the mission.
  • A student might ask, “Did I miss roll call? I was running late.”

32. Meet up

This phrase means to arrange a meeting or get together with someone. It is often used when making plans to see friends or acquaintances.

  • For instance, a friend might text, “Let’s meet up for coffee tomorrow.”
  • When planning a group outing, someone might suggest, “We should all meet up at the park.”
  • A person might ask, “Are we still meeting up tonight? I need to know what time.”

33. Show up

To “show up” means to arrive or be present at a specific place or event. It implies being punctual and fulfilling a commitment.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “Make sure to show up on time for the meeting.”
  • When discussing a party, someone might ask, “Who showed up last night?”
  • A friend might comment, “You didn’t show up to the concert. We missed you!”

34. Swing by

This phrase means to make a quick visit or stop by a place, often without prior notice or a set appointment.

  • For instance, a neighbor might say, “Feel free to swing by anytime for a cup of coffee.”
  • When inviting someone over, a person might say, “Why don’t you swing by my place for dinner?”
  • A friend might text, “I’m in the area. Can I swing by your office?”

35. Log in

This term refers to the act of entering one’s credentials or personal information to gain access to a computer system, website, or online platform.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “Make sure to log in to your email before the meeting.”
  • When discussing online gaming, a player might ask, “Who wants to log in and play together?”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t log in to my account. I forgot my password.”

36. Stop by

This phrase means to make a quick visit to a place or person. It implies a short duration and a casual or informal interaction.

  • For example, “I’m going to stop by the office to pick up my paycheck.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll stop by your place later to drop off that book.”
  • When inviting someone, you could say, “Feel free to stop by anytime for a cup of coffee.”

37. Check with

This phrase means to verify information or seek approval from someone in a position of authority or knowledge.

  • For instance, “I need to check with my supervisor before taking time off.”
  • If unsure about a decision, someone might say, “Let me check with my friends before making plans.”
  • When seeking advice, you could ask, “Can I check with you about which restaurant to choose?”

38. Check out of

This phrase refers to the process of formally ending one’s stay or membership at a location, such as a hotel or organization.

  • For example, “We need to check out of the hotel by noon.”
  • When leaving a party, you might say, “I should check out of here before it gets too late.”
  • If ending a subscription, you could say, “I’ve decided to check out of that streaming service.”

39. Check off

This phrase means to indicate that a task or item on a list has been finished or accomplished.

  • For instance, “I can finally check off ‘clean the garage’ from my to-do list.”
  • When finishing a project, someone might say, “Let’s check off the last few tasks and celebrate our accomplishment.”
  • If completing a checklist, you could say, “I’ll check off each item as we go along.”

40. Check for

This phrase means to search or inspect something for a specific purpose or to ensure its presence or condition.

  • For example, “I need to check for my keys before leaving the house.”
  • When inspecting a document, someone might say, “Let me check for any errors or typos.”
  • If verifying the availability of a product, you could ask, “Can you check for the item in the back?”

41. Be in the neighborhood

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is close to a particular place and may want to check in or visit.

  • For example, “I’ll be in the neighborhood later, so I can stop by the office.”
  • A friend might say, “Let me know if you’re in the neighborhood and we can grab lunch.”
  • When making plans, someone might suggest, “If you’re in the neighborhood, we should meet up for coffee.”

42. Stop over

This phrase means to visit or stay at a place for a short period of time, often during a longer journey.

  • For instance, “I’m going to stop over at my friend’s house on my way to the airport.”
  • A traveler might say, “I’ll stop over in New York for a few days before continuing my trip.”
  • When discussing travel plans, someone might ask, “Do you want to stop over in Paris on our way to Rome?”

43. Register

This term refers to the act of officially checking in or signing up for a particular event, program, or service.

  • For example, “You need to register at the front desk before entering the conference.”
  • A person might say, “I registered for the workshop and received my confirmation email.”
  • When discussing a new club, someone might ask, “Have you registered to become a member yet?”

44. Drop in

This phrase means to visit someone or somewhere informally and without making plans in advance.

  • For instance, “I thought I’d drop in and see if you wanted to grab dinner.”
  • A friend might say, “Feel free to drop in anytime. I’m usually home.”
  • When inviting someone to visit, someone might say, “You should drop in next time you’re in town.”

45. Arrive

This term simply means to reach or reach a specific destination or location.

  • For example, “I arrived at the hotel and checked in.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll arrive at the office around 9 am.”
  • When discussing travel plans, someone might ask, “What time does your flight arrive?”

46. Arrive at

This phrase is used to indicate the act of reaching a specific place or location.

  • For example, “I will arrive at the hotel at 3 PM.”
  • When discussing travel plans, someone might say, “We need to arrive at the airport at least two hours before the flight.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might ask, “What time did you arrive at the office this morning?”

47. Clock out

This slang term refers to the act of recording the end of a work shift by using a time clock or similar system.

  • For instance, “I can’t wait to clock out and go home.”
  • During a conversation about work hours, someone might say, “I usually clock out at 5 PM.”
  • In a workplace, a coworker might ask, “What time did you clock out yesterday?”

48. Touch in

This phrase is commonly used to describe the action of recording one’s attendance or presence at a specific location.

  • For example, “Don’t forget to touch in when you arrive at the conference.”
  • When discussing attendance policies, someone might say, “Employees are required to touch in at the beginning of the workday.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might remind students, “Remember to touch in when you arrive in the classroom.”

49. Sign up

This slang term refers to the act of registering or enrolling for a particular event, service, or membership.

  • For instance, “I need to sign up for the yoga class.”
  • During a discussion about online platforms, someone might say, “You can sign up for a free trial on their website.”
  • In a conversation about a new club, a person might ask, “Have you signed up to become a member yet?”
See also  Top 39 Slang For Eyes – Meaning & Usage