Top 56 Slang For Mimic – Meaning & Usage

Mimicking someone’s speech or behavior can be a fun way to connect and show understanding. But, have you ever wondered what slang terms are used to describe this playful act? Look no further as we’ve gathered a list of the most popular phrases for mimicry that will have you nodding in agreement and itching to try them out in your next conversation. Get ready to add some flair to your language game with these trendy expressions!

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1. Copycat

This term refers to someone who copies or imitates the actions or behaviors of another person. It is often used to describe someone who mimics someone else’s style, ideas, or work.

  • For example, in a creative field, one might say, “Don’t be a copycat, come up with your own original ideas.”
  • In a school setting, a student might be called a copycat if they consistently copy another student’s homework or test answers.
  • A person might accuse someone of being a copycat if they notice that the person is dressing or speaking exactly like someone else.

2. Parrot

This slang term is used to describe someone who mindlessly repeats or mimics what others say, without adding any original thoughts or ideas of their own.

  • For instance, in a conversation, one person might say, “Stop parroting everything I say and think for yourself.”
  • In a workplace setting, a supervisor might tell an employee, “I don’t want parrots on my team, I want people who can think critically.”
  • A person might use the term parrot to describe someone who mindlessly shares or retweets information on social media without verifying its accuracy.

3. Echo

This term is used to describe someone who simply echoes or repeats what others have said, without offering any original thoughts or ideas.

  • For example, in a group discussion, one person might say, “We need more original ideas, not just echoes of what’s already been said.”
  • In a political context, a person might criticize a politician for being an echo, saying, “All they do is repeat the party line without thinking for themselves.”
  • A person might describe a news outlet as an echo if they believe it simply parrots the views of a particular political ideology.

4. Mirror

This slang term is used to describe someone who perfectly imitates or reflects the actions, mannerisms, or behaviors of another person.

  • For instance, in a theater production, one actor might say to another, “Your performance was like looking in a mirror, it was so accurate.”
  • In a social setting, a person might say to a friend, “You’re mirroring their body language, it’s making them feel more comfortable.”
  • A person might use the term mirror to describe a celebrity impersonator who perfectly mimics the appearance and behavior of a famous person.

5. Impersonate

This term refers to the act of pretending to be someone else, often with the intention of deceiving or fooling others. It involves mimicking the appearance, voice, or behavior of the person being impersonated.

  • For example, in a comedy skit, a performer might impersonate a famous celebrity to entertain the audience.
  • In a criminal context, a person might be charged with impersonation if they pretend to be a police officer or other authority figure.
  • A person might accuse someone of impersonating them if they discover that someone else has been using their identity or pretending to be them online.

6. Mime

To imitate someone or something through physical gestures and expressions. Miming often involves using exaggerated movements and facial expressions to convey meaning without speaking.

  • For example, a person might say, “She can mime the entire storyline of a movie without saying a word.”
  • In a performance, a mime might pretend to be trapped in an invisible box, creating the illusion through their movements.
  • A person might comment, “He’s a great mime artist. He can mimic any object or action with incredible precision.”

7. Emulate

To imitate or match the actions, behavior, or style of someone or something. Emulating often involves trying to replicate the qualities or characteristics of another person or thing.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I want to emulate the success of my favorite author.”
  • In sports, an athlete might strive to emulate the playing style of their idol.
  • A person might comment, “She has a unique fashion sense that many try to emulate.”

8. Mirror image

An exact or near-exact copy or reflection of someone or something. A mirror image refers to a replication of the original, often with little to no differences.

  • For example, a person might say, “The two sisters are mirror images of each other. They look almost identical.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might comment, “The artist’s painting is a mirror image of the original photograph.”
  • A person might note, “His actions are a mirror image of his father’s. They have the same mannerisms and behaviors.”

9. Doppelganger

A person who closely resembles another person, often to the point of being mistaken for them. The term “doppelganger” is used to describe someone who looks like a twin or double of another person.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I saw my doppelganger at the mall today. We could pass as twins!”
  • In literature, a character might encounter their doppelganger, leading to a plot twist or revelation.
  • A person might comment, “It’s uncanny how much they look alike. They could easily be mistaken for doppelgangers.”

10. Twinning

A slang term used to express similarity or agreement with someone or something. “Twinning” is often used to indicate that two things or people are identical or closely resemble each other.

  • For example, a person might say, “We both showed up wearing the same outfit. Twinning!”
  • In social media captions, someone might post a photo with a friend and write, “Twinning with my bestie.”
  • A person might comment, “Their hairstyles are twinning. They must have coordinated their looks.”

11. Shadow

This term refers to someone who imitates or mimics another person’s actions, behavior, or style. It can be used to describe someone who is trying to be like someone else or who is intentionally copying their actions.

  • For example, “She’s such a shadow, always trying to dress and act like her favorite celebrity.”
  • In a discussion about plagiarism, one might say, “Copying someone else’s work is like being a shadow, taking credit for their ideas.”
  • A person might describe someone who is constantly imitating them as, “He’s always shadowing me, trying to be just like me.”

12. Clone

To clone is to create an exact replica or duplicate of something or someone. In the context of mimicry, it refers to imitating someone or something to the point of being an identical copy.

  • For instance, “He’s a clone of his older brother, they look and act just alike.”
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, one might say, “Everyone seems to be cloning that celebrity’s style.”
  • A person might comment on a talented impersonator, “He’s able to clone the mannerisms and voice of famous singers.”

13. Imposter

An imposter is someone who pretends to be someone else or claims to have skills, abilities, or qualifications that they do not possess. In the context of mimicry, it refers to someone who is pretending to be someone they are not.

  • For example, “He’s such an imposter, pretending to be a doctor when he has no medical training.”
  • In a discussion about identity theft, one might say, “The imposter stole her personal information and posed as her.”
  • A person might describe someone who is pretending to be part of a group, “He’s an imposter, trying to infiltrate our circle and gain our trust.”

14. Mock

To mock is to imitate or mimic someone or something in a way that is intended to ridicule, tease, or make fun of them. It involves imitating someone’s actions, behavior, or mannerisms in a mocking or derisive manner.

  • For instance, “She mocked his accent, imitating it in a exaggerated and disrespectful way.”
  • In a discussion about comedy, one might say, “He’s known for his ability to mock politicians and celebrities in his stand-up routines.”
  • A person might describe someone who is imitating them in a mocking way, “He’s always mocking me, making fun of my gestures and speech.”

15. Repeat

To repeat is to imitate or mimic someone or something by saying or doing the same thing again. It involves copying someone’s words, actions, or behavior in a way that is similar or identical.

  • For example, “She repeated his words, imitating his tone and manner of speaking.”
  • In a discussion about learning, one might say, “Repeating information helps to solidify it in your memory.”
  • A person might describe someone who is imitating their dance moves, “She’s repeating my steps, trying to learn the choreography.”

16. Xerox

To xerox means to imitate or copy someone or something. It is often used to describe someone who mimics the actions, behavior, or style of another person.

  • For example, “He’s always xeroxing his favorite celebrity’s fashion choices.”
  • In a conversation about comedy, someone might say, “She’s a great comedian who can xerox the mannerisms of famous politicians.”
  • A friend might joke, “Stop xeroxing my dance moves!”

17. Aping

Aping is a slang term that means imitating someone or something in a mocking or exaggerated way. It is often used to criticize someone who is copying another person’s actions or behavior without adding anything original.

  • For instance, “He’s always aping his boss’s management style, but he doesn’t have any leadership skills.”
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, someone might say, “She’s just aping the latest celebrity look.”
  • A friend might tease, “Stop aping me and come up with your own ideas!”

18. Reflect

To reflect means to imitate or mimic someone or something. It is often used to describe someone who copies the actions, behavior, or style of another person.

  • For example, “She reflects her favorite singer’s fashion choices.”
  • In a conversation about acting, someone might say, “He can reflect the emotions of any character he plays.”
  • A friend might comment, “You really reflect your mother’s mannerisms!”

19. Regurgitate

Regurgitate is a slang term that means to imitate or repeat something without understanding or adding any originality. It is often used to criticize someone who mindlessly copies or mimics the words or ideas of others.

  • For instance, “He just regurgitates what he hears on the news without forming his own opinions.”
  • In a discussion about creativity, someone might say, “She’s not an original thinker, she just regurgitates what she reads.”
  • A friend might joke, “Stop being a parrot and come up with your own ideas!”

20. Imitate

To imitate means to mimic or copy someone or something. It is a general term used to describe the act of reproducing the actions, behavior, or style of another person.

  • For example, “He can imitate the voices of famous celebrities.”
  • In a conversation about art, someone might say, “She has a talent for imitating famous paintings.”
  • A friend might comment, “You really imitate your favorite actor’s mannerisms!”

21. Carbon copy

A “carbon copy” refers to an exact replica or duplicate of something or someone. The term originated from the process of making copies using carbon paper.

  • For example, in a conversation about a talented actor, one might say, “He’s a carbon copy of his famous father.”
  • When discussing a forged document, someone might comment, “This looks like a carbon copy of the original.”
  • In the context of art, a critic might describe a painting as “a carbon copy of a famous masterpiece.”

22. Mimicker

A “mimicker” is someone who imitates or copies the actions, mannerisms, or speech of another person. It is often used to describe someone who is skilled at mimicking the behavior of others.

  • For instance, in a comedy show, a performer might introduce themselves as “the world’s greatest mimicker.”
  • When discussing a talented impressionist, someone might say, “He’s an incredible mimicker, he can imitate anyone.”
  • In a conversation about a friend who always copies others, one might comment, “She’s such a mimicker, she doesn’t have her own style.”

23. Impression

An “impression” refers to imitating or mimicking someone’s voice, mannerisms, or behavior in a humorous or entertaining way.

  • For example, a comedian might say, “I do a great impression of Arnold Schwarzenegger.”
  • When discussing a talented actor, someone might comment, “His impression of that famous politician was spot on.”
  • In a conversation about a viral video, one might say, “Have you seen that guy’s impression of a famous singer? It’s hilarious!”

24. Parody

A “parody” is a humorous or exaggerated imitation of a person, work of art, or genre. It often involves imitating the style or characteristics of the original for comedic effect.

  • For instance, a comedy sketch that pokes fun at a popular TV show can be considered a parody.
  • When discussing a funny song that mimics a well-known hit, someone might say, “It’s a parody of the original, with hilarious lyrics.”
  • In the context of literature, a satirical novel that mocks a famous work can be described as a parody.
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25. Photocopy

A “photocopy” refers to an exact reproduction or duplicate of a document or image made using a photocopier or similar machine.

  • For example, when discussing a document that needs to be shared, someone might say, “Make a photocopy of it before sending it out.”
  • When talking about a printed photograph, one might comment, “I have a photocopy of that picture, do you want one?”
  • In an office setting, someone might ask, “Can you make a photocopy of this report for me?”

26. Ape

This term refers to someone who imitates or mimics the actions, behavior, or style of another person. It can also be used to describe someone who replicates something without adding any originality.

  • For example, “He’s such an ape, always copying my outfits.”
  • In a discussion about plagiarism, someone might say, “Submitting someone else’s work as your own is the ultimate form of being an ape.”
  • One might comment on a musician’s lack of originality by saying, “Their latest song is just an ape of another artist’s hit.”

27. Imitator

This term refers to someone who mimics or copies the actions, behavior, or style of another person. It can also be used to describe someone who replicates something without adding any originality.

  • For instance, “He’s such an imitator, always trying to be like someone else.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “True artists strive to be innovators, not mere imitators.”
  • A person might comment on a comedian’s lack of original jokes by saying, “They’re just an imitator, stealing material from others.”

28. Counterfeit

This term refers to something that is made to closely resemble an original or genuine item, often with the intent to deceive or defraud. In the context of mimicry, it can be used to describe someone who imitates or replicates another person or thing.

  • For example, “She’s a counterfeit designer, making knockoff versions of popular fashion brands.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “Copying another artist’s work is not true creativity, it’s just counterfeit.”
  • A person might describe a fraudster who pretends to be someone else online as a “counterfeit identity.”
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29. Impostor

This term refers to someone who pretends to be someone else in order to deceive others. In the context of mimicry, it can be used to describe someone who imitates or replicates another person or thing.

  • For instance, “He’s an impostor, pretending to be a famous celebrity on social media.”
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might say, “Beware of impostors posing as your bank, asking for personal information.”
  • A person might describe someone who copies their work and claims it as their own as an “impostor artist.”

30. Xerox copy

This term refers to a copy or reproduction that is made using a Xerox machine, which is a brand of photocopier. In the context of mimicry, it can be used to describe someone who creates an exact replica or duplicate of another person or thing.

  • For example, “He’s just a Xerox copy of his famous father, with the same looks and mannerisms.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “Creating a Xerox copy of an existing painting is not considered original artwork.”
  • A person might describe a mimicry act that perfectly replicates the performance of a famous singer as a “Xerox copy performance.”

31. Ditto

This term is used to refer to someone who imitates or copies the actions or words of another person. It can also be used as a verb to mean imitating or copying someone.

  • For example, “She’s such a ditto, always wearing the same clothes as her favorite celebrity.”
  • In a conversation about someone who mimics others, one might say, “He’s a ditto, always trying to be like someone else.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m going to ditto everything you do today, just to annoy you.”

32. Mocker

This term is used to describe someone who mimics or imitates the actions, behavior, or speech of others. It can be used to refer to someone who mocks or makes fun of others as well.

  • For instance, “He’s such a mocker, always imitating his friends’ accents.”
  • In a discussion about someone who imitates others, one might say, “She’s a skilled mocker, able to mimic anyone’s voice.”
  • A person might playfully say, “Stop being a mocker and come up with your own jokes!”

33. Impressionist

This term is used to describe someone who is skilled at imitating the voices, accents, or mannerisms of others. It can also refer to someone who imitates or copies the work of another artist.

  • For example, “He’s an amazing impressionist, he can mimic any celebrity’s voice.”
  • In a conversation about someone who imitates others, one might say, “She’s a talented impressionist, she can imitate anyone’s laugh.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m going to challenge you to an impressionist competition, let’s see who can imitate the best!”

34. Echoer

This term is used to describe someone who mindlessly repeats or echoes the words or actions of others without thinking or understanding. It can also be used to refer to someone who imitates or copies the behavior or style of another person.

  • For instance, “He’s such an echoer, always repeating what others say without adding anything new.”
  • In a discussion about someone who mimics others, one might say, “She’s a parrot, always copying her friends’ fashion choices.”
  • A person might playfully say, “Stop being an echoer and come up with your own ideas!”

35. Parakeet

This term is used to describe someone who imitates or mimics the words, sounds, or actions of others. It can also be used as a verb to mean imitating or copying someone.

  • For example, “He’s a parakeet, always mimicking his sister’s dance moves.”
  • In a conversation about someone who imitates others, one might say, “She’s a skilled parakeet, able to mimic anyone’s singing voice.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m going to parakeet everything you say today, just to annoy you.”

36. Regurgitator

This term refers to someone who mindlessly imitates or copies others without originality or thought. “Regurgitator” suggests that the person is simply regurgitating or spitting out what they have heard or seen without understanding or adding anything new.

  • For example, in a discussion about art, someone might say, “That artist is just a regurgitator, copying the styles of others without any creativity.”
  • In a conversation about music, a critic might comment, “This band lacks originality and is just a regurgitator of popular trends.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I’m a regurgitator of movie quotes. I can recite entire scenes!”

37. Xerox machine

This term humorously compares someone to a Xerox machine, which is a brand of photocopier known for producing exact copies. Calling someone a “Xerox machine” implies that they are adept at mimicking or reproducing things precisely.

  • For instance, in a discussion about comedy, someone might say, “He’s like a Xerox machine, perfectly imitating the mannerisms and voices of famous comedians.”
  • In a conversation about impersonations, someone might comment, “She’s a human Xerox machine, nailing every accent and gesture.”
  • A person might playfully say, “I’m a Xerox machine when it comes to dance moves. I can copy any choreography!”

38. Impressionable

This term describes someone who is easily swayed or influenced by others. “Impressionable” suggests that the person is malleable, like clay, and can easily be molded or shaped by external forces.

  • For example, in a discussion about marketing, someone might say, “Advertisers target impressionable young people who are easily influenced by trends.”
  • In a conversation about peer pressure, a parent might express concern, “Teenagers are often impressionable and can make poor choices when influenced by their peers.”
  • A person might reflect, “I was impressionable in my youth, but now I have a stronger sense of self.”

39. Aper

This term refers to someone who imitates or mimics others. “Aper” suggests that the person is copying or imitating in a playful or mocking manner.

  • For instance, in a discussion about comedy, someone might say, “He’s a talented aper, able to perfectly mimic the voices and mannerisms of celebrities.”
  • In a conversation about impersonations, a friend might ask, “Can you do an impression of that famous actor? You’re such a great aper!”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m an aper of my siblings’ annoying habits. I can imitate them perfectly!”

40. Echo chamber

This term refers to an environment or group where people mindlessly repeat or echo the same ideas or opinions without critical thought or independent thinking. “Echo chamber” suggests that the people within this group are simply echoing or parroting the same ideas without adding any new perspectives.

  • For example, in a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Social media can become an echo chamber, with people only following and engaging with those who share their views.”
  • In a conversation about diversity of thought, a person might comment, “We need to break out of our echo chambers and actively seek out differing opinions.”
  • A friend might playfully say, “We’re in the parrot zone, just repeating each other’s jokes. Can we come up with something original?”

41. Mime artist

A mime artist is a performer who uses gestures, body movements, and facial expressions to convey emotions and tell stories without speaking. They often wear white makeup and black clothing to emphasize their actions.

  • For example, “The mime artist entertained the crowd with a hilarious skit.”
  • During a street performance, a passerby might say, “That mime artist is incredibly talented.”
  • A theater critic might write, “The mime artist’s portrayal of a trapped bird was both poignant and captivating.”

42. Mockingbird

A mockingbird is a type of bird known for its ability to mimic the sounds of other birds and even human noises. The term “mockingbird” is often used metaphorically to describe someone who imitates or copies the actions, behaviors, or words of others.

  • For instance, “She’s like a mockingbird, always copying what other people say.”
  • If someone is imitating another person’s accent, you might say, “Stop being such a mockingbird.”
  • A writer might use the phrase, “His writing style is like a mockingbird, adapting to different genres effortlessly.”

43. Imitative

Imitative refers to someone or something that copies or mimics the actions, behaviors, or characteristics of another person or thing. It can be used to describe a person who imitates someone else’s mannerisms, style, or speech.

  • For example, “The child’s imitative behavior often mirrors that of their parents.”
  • If someone is mimicking another person’s gestures, you might say, “Don’t be so imitative.”
  • A fashion critic might comment, “Her imitative style lacks originality and creativity.”

44. Parroted

To parrot means to repeat or mimic something without understanding its meaning or significance. It can be used to describe someone who mindlessly repeats what others say without thinking critically or adding their own thoughts.

  • For instance, “He just parroted what the teacher said without actually understanding the concept.”
  • If someone is mindlessly repeating information, you might say, “Stop parroting what you heard on the news.”
  • A journalist might write, “The politician’s speech was filled with parroted talking points.”

45. Echoed

To echo means to repeat or reflect sound waves, creating a repetition of a sound. In the context of mimicry, “echoed” can be used to describe someone who imitates or copies the words or actions of another person.

  • For example, “Her words echoed in my mind long after she had left.”
  • If someone is repeating what another person just said, you might say, “He echoed her words in agreement.”
  • A poet might use the phrase, “His words echoed through the empty room, filling it with a haunting melody.”

46. Mirroring

Mirroring refers to the act of imitating or copying someone’s actions, behavior, or mannerisms. It is often used in psychology or interpersonal communication to build rapport or establish a connection with someone.

  • For example, during a job interview, a candidate might mirror the interviewer’s body language to create a sense of familiarity.
  • In a social setting, someone might mirror a friend’s gestures or expressions to show empathy or understanding.
  • In the context of mimicry, mirroring can also refer to imitating someone’s speech patterns or accent.
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47. Impersonated

Impersonated refers to the act of pretending to be someone else, often with the intention of deceiving or fooling others. It is commonly used in the context of performances, pranks, or impersonations of famous individuals.

  • For instance, a comedian might impersonate a celebrity during a comedy routine to entertain the audience.
  • In a prank video, someone might impersonate a store employee to confuse or surprise customers.
  • In a legal context, impersonation can refer to the crime of assuming someone’s identity for fraudulent purposes.

48. Miming

Miming refers to the act of expressing ideas, emotions, or actions through gestures, body movements, and facial expressions, without the use of words. It is often associated with silent performances or visual storytelling.

  • For example, a street performer might entertain passersby by miming the actions of a trapped person trying to escape.
  • In theater, miming can be used to create imaginary objects or interact with invisible props.
  • In everyday conversation, someone might use miming to convey a message when they are unable to speak or when language barriers exist.

49. Mocked

Mocked refers to the act of imitating or ridiculing someone or something, often in a sarcastic or mocking manner. It is commonly used to make fun of or criticize someone’s behavior, appearance, or ideas.

  • For instance, a comedian might mock a political figure’s speech or mannerisms to satirize their actions.
  • In a friendly banter, friends might mock each other’s hobbies or interests in a playful way.
  • Mocking can also occur in online communities, where users imitate or parody certain behaviors or trends for comedic effect.

50. Aped

Aped refers to the act of copying or imitating someone, often without originality or creativity. It is commonly used to describe someone who mindlessly imitates the actions, behavior, or style of another person.

  • For example, a student might aped their classmate’s essay, submitting it as their own work.
  • In the world of fashion, designers might accuse each other of aping their designs without giving proper credit.
  • Aping can also refer to imitating someone’s accent or speech patterns, often in a mocking or derogatory manner.

51. Emulated

To copy or imitate the actions or behavior of someone or something. “Emulated” is often used to describe the act of replicating or mimicking someone’s style, technique, or performance.

  • For example, a student might say, “I emulated my favorite artist’s painting style.”
  • A musician might explain, “I wanted to create a song that emulates the sound of the 80s.”
  • A comedian might say, “I often emulate famous comedians in my stand-up routine.”

52. Dittoed

To repeat or reproduce something exactly as it was originally. “Dittoed” is commonly used to indicate that something has been copied or replicated without any changes.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I dittoed her outfit for the party.”
  • In a discussion about artwork, someone might mention, “The artist dittoed the original painting to create limited edition prints.”
  • A student might admit, “I dittoed my friend’s homework because I ran out of time.”

53. Parodied

To imitate or mimic something or someone in a humorous or exaggerated way, often to criticize or mock. “Parodied” is used to describe the act of creating a parody, which is a comedic imitation that exaggerates certain aspects for comedic effect.

  • For example, a comedian might say, “I parodied a popular TV show in one of my sketches.”
  • A writer might explain, “The satirical article parodied current political events.”
  • A filmmaker might say, “I created a parody of a famous movie scene in my short film.”

54. Regurgitated

To repeat or reproduce something without much thought or originality. “Regurgitated” is often used to describe the act of copying or imitating something without adding any new ideas or insights.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I regurgitated the textbook information in my essay.”
  • In a discussion about originality in art, someone might criticize, “His work is just regurgitated ideas from other artists.”
  • A writer might admit, “I regurgitated some of the information from my previous article in the new one.”

55. Xeroxed

To make a copy or replica of something using a photocopier. “Xeroxed” is commonly used to describe the act of duplicating or reproducing something exactly as it is.

  • For example, a person might say, “I xeroxed the document for everyone in the office.”
  • In a discussion about plagiarism, someone might warn, “Copying and xeroxing someone else’s work is not acceptable.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please don’t xerox your friend’s homework. It’s important to do your own work.”

56. Imitated

This term refers to someone who mimics or imitates the actions, behavior, or style of another person. It can be used to describe someone who copies someone else’s ideas, fashion choices, or mannerisms.

  • For example, “She’s such a copycat, always imitating the way I dress.”
  • A person might say, “Stop being a copycat and come up with your own ideas.”
  • In a discussion about plagiarism, someone might comment, “Imitating someone else’s work without giving credit is a serious offense.”