Top 37 Slang For Outdated – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language evolves at lightning speed, some words and phrases can quickly become outdated. Curious to know which ones are on their way out? Look no further! We’ve done the research and compiled a list of the top slang terms that are slowly fading into obscurity. Stay ahead of the curve and brush up on your modern lingo with our comprehensive guide.

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1. Antiquated

This term refers to something that is outdated or no longer in use. It suggests that the thing in question is old-fashioned and has been replaced by more modern alternatives.

  • For example, someone might say, “Using a typewriter is so antiquated in the age of computers.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might argue, “Fax machines are becoming antiquated in the era of email.”
  • A person might describe a fashion trend as, “That style is so antiquated, no one wears it anymore.”

2. Obsolete

When something is obsolete, it means that it is no longer in use or relevant. It suggests that the thing in question has been replaced by newer, more advanced options.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Landline phones have become obsolete with the rise of cell phones.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might argue, “CD players are becoming obsolete as streaming services take over.”
  • A person might describe a discontinued product as, “That model of car is obsolete now.”

3. Archaic

Archaic refers to something that is ancient or no longer in use. It suggests that the thing in question is from a much earlier time and is no longer relevant or commonly used.

  • For example, someone might say, “Using a quill pen is so archaic in the age of ballpoint pens.”
  • In a discussion about language, one might argue, “Shakespearean English is considered archaic in modern times.”
  • A person might describe a traditional form of transportation as, “Riding a horse and carriage is archaic compared to cars.”

4. Outmoded

When something is outmoded, it means that it is no longer fashionable or useful. It suggests that the thing in question is outdated and has been replaced by newer, more modern alternatives.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Bell-bottom pants are outmoded and no longer in style.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might argue, “VHS tapes are outmoded with the rise of streaming services.”
  • A person might describe an old method of doing something as, “That technique is outmoded, there’s a more efficient way now.”

5. Passé

Passé refers to something that is no longer trendy or in fashion. It suggests that the thing in question was once popular or fashionable but is now considered outdated.

  • For example, someone might say, “Wearing fanny packs is so passé, it’s not cool anymore.”
  • In a discussion about music, one might argue, “Disco music is considered passé in today’s music scene.”
  • A person might describe a former trend as, “That hairstyle is so passé, no one wears it anymore.”

6. Behind the times

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is not current or modern. It implies that the person or thing is behind in terms of trends, technology, or knowledge.

  • For example, “He still uses a flip phone? He’s really behind the times.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “That style of jeans is so behind the times.”
  • A person discussing music might comment, “Listening to CDs instead of streaming is really behind the times.”

7. Old hat

This term refers to something that is no longer new or innovative. It suggests that the thing in question is outdated or no longer considered trendy.

  • For instance, “Wearing bell-bottoms is so old hat.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Fax machines are old hat in today’s digital age.”
  • A person commenting on a fashion trend might remark, “That hairstyle was popular years ago, it’s old hat now.”

8. Retro

This word is used to describe something that is designed or made in a style reminiscent of the past. It often refers to a vintage or nostalgic aesthetic.

  • For example, “She decorated her living room with retro furniture from the 1960s.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “That dress has a retro vibe.”
  • A person discussing music might comment, “The band’s sound is heavily influenced by retro rock.”

9. Vintage

This term is used to describe something that is from a previous era, typically considered to be of high quality or value. It often refers to items that are at least 20 years old.

  • For instance, “She collects vintage vinyl records.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “I love shopping for vintage clothing at thrift stores.”
  • A person commenting on a car might remark, “That vintage car is a classic.”

10. Fuddy-duddy

This word is used to describe someone who is perceived as being old-fashioned, conservative, or resistant to change. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For example, “My grandpa is such a fuddy-duddy when it comes to technology.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “She’s always wearing frumpy clothes, such a fuddy-duddy.”
  • A person commenting on someone’s taste in music might remark, “He only listens to classical music, what a fuddy-duddy.”

11. Square

This term refers to someone or something that is considered outdated or not in touch with current trends or styles.

  • For example, a person might say, “That outfit is so square, no one wears bell-bottoms anymore.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might comment, “That band’s sound is a bit square for my taste.”
  • A teenager might describe a strict teacher as “totally square.”
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12. Dated

This word is used to describe something that is no longer considered modern or up-to-date.

  • For instance, a person might say, “That hairstyle is so dated, it reminds me of the 80s.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might comment, “That phone model is already dated, there are newer and more advanced options available.”
  • A person might describe an old movie as “dated” due to its outdated special effects or storytelling techniques.

13. Out of touch

This phrase is used to describe someone who is disconnected from current popular culture or societal changes.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s so out of touch, he still thinks MySpace is the most popular social media platform.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might comment, “The politician’s outdated views show that he is out of touch with the concerns of the younger generation.”
  • A person might describe an older relative as “out of touch” when they struggle to understand modern technology or slang.

14. Yesterday’s news

This phrase is used to describe something that was once newsworthy or significant but is now considered old or uninteresting.

  • For instance, a person might say, “That scandal is old news, everyone has moved on.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might comment, “That gadget was popular last year, but it’s yesterday’s news now.”
  • A person might describe a retired athlete as “yesterday’s news” when discussing current sports stars.

15. Stone age

This term is used to describe something that is considered to be from a time long ago and no longer relevant or useful.

  • For example, a person might say, “Using a typewriter in the digital age is like living in the stone age.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might comment, “That software is so outdated, it feels like it’s from the stone age.”
  • A person might describe a manual labor job as “stone age” when comparing it to modern automated processes.

16. Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs are prehistoric reptiles that lived millions of years ago and are now extinct. The term “dinosaurs” is often used metaphorically to describe something that is old-fashioned or outdated.

  • For example, “Those old flip phones are like dinosaurs compared to smartphones.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Fax machines are dinosaurs in the age of email.”
  • A person might describe a traditional way of doing things as “dinosaur thinking.”

17. Dusty

The term “dusty” is slang for something that is out of touch or old-fashioned. It implies that something is no longer relevant or up to date.

  • For instance, “His fashion sense is so dusty. He still wears bell-bottoms.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “That song is too dusty for my taste.”
  • A person might describe an outdated slang term as “dusty language.”

18. Old school

The term “old school” refers to something that is traditional or classic. It often implies that something is from a previous era and may be considered outdated by modern standards.

  • For example, “I prefer old school hip-hop over the new stuff.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might say, “I learned math the old school way, with a pencil and paper.”
  • A person might describe a vintage car as “old school cool.”

19. Stale

The term “stale” is slang for something that is no longer fresh or relevant. It can be used to describe ideas, trends, or anything that has become outdated.

  • For instance, “That joke is so stale. I’ve heard it a hundred times.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “Those shoes are stale. They were popular last year.”
  • A person might describe an outdated meme as “stale humor.”
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20. Over the hill

The phrase “over the hill” is slang for being past one’s prime or reaching an age where one is considered old or no longer relevant. It implies that someone or something is no longer at their peak.

  • For example, “He’s turning 40 this year. He’s officially over the hill.”
  • In a discussion about athletes, someone might say, “He used to be a star player, but now he’s over the hill.”
  • A person might describe an outdated technology as “over the hill.”

21. Granny-tech

Granny-tech refers to outdated or old-fashioned technology, especially in reference to devices or gadgets that are no longer in use or have been replaced by more advanced technology. The term is often used humorously or affectionately.

  • For example, “Wow, that flip phone is total granny-tech!”
  • A person might say, “I found this old VCR in my attic. Talk about granny-tech!”
  • Another might comment, “Remember when CDs were the height of granny-tech?”

22. Ancient

Ancient is a term used to describe something that is extremely old or outdated. It can be used to refer to objects, ideas, or even people who are considered old-fashioned or out of touch with current trends.

  • For instance, “That computer is ancient! It’s at least 10 years old.”
  • A person might say, “My parents are so ancient. They still listen to cassette tapes.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t believe people used to wear bell-bottoms. That style is ancient now.”

23. Prehistoric

Prehistoric is a term used to describe something that is extremely old or outdated, similar to the term ancient. It can be used to refer to things that are no longer in use or relevant in modern times.

  • For example, “That car is prehistoric! It doesn’t even have power windows.”
  • Someone might say, “I found this prehistoric recipe for a dish called ambrosia. It’s like something from another era.”
  • Another might comment, “Using a typewriter feels so prehistoric compared to using a computer.”

24. Outworn

Outworn is a term used to describe something that is no longer fashionable or useful, often due to being outdated or old-fashioned. It implies that the item or idea has served its purpose and is no longer relevant or in style.

  • For instance, “Those bell-bottom pants are outworn. No one wears them anymore.”
  • A person might say, “I found this outworn manual for a computer program. It’s completely obsolete.”
  • Another might comment, “The traditional gender roles of the past are outworn. Society has moved beyond those outdated expectations.”

25. Out to pasture

Out to pasture is a phrase used to describe something or someone that is no longer in active use or relevant, often due to being outdated or out of touch. It can be used to refer to objects, ideas, or even people who are considered obsolete or no longer part of current trends.

  • For example, “That old computer is out to pasture. It’s been replaced by newer models.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe people used to communicate by fax. That technology is definitely out to pasture.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s an old politician who’s been out to pasture for years. He doesn’t understand the current issues.”

26. Out of style

This phrase is used to describe something that is no longer considered fashionable or in vogue.

  • For example, “Those bell-bottom jeans are so out of style.”
  • A fashion critic might say, “That hairstyle is completely out of style.”
  • Someone might comment on a person’s outfit, “Your shoes are a bit out of style, don’t you think?”

27. Out of fashion

Similar to “out of style,” this phrase refers to something that is no longer considered fashionable or trendy.

  • For instance, “That type of hat is really out of fashion.”
  • A fashion blogger might write, “Flared jeans are making a comeback, but skinny jeans are definitely out of fashion.”
  • A friend might suggest, “You should update your wardrobe; some of your clothes are out of fashion.”

28. Out of date

This phrase is used to describe something that is no longer up-to-date or current.

  • For example, “That computer is so out of date; you need to upgrade.”
  • A technology expert might say, “This software version is out of date; you should install the latest update.”
  • Someone might comment on an old news article, “This information is out of date; there have been new developments since then.”

29. Out of the loop

This phrase is used to describe someone who is not up-to-date or knowledgeable about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, “I’ve been out of the loop; can you fill me in on what’s been happening?”
  • A coworker might say, “Sorry, I’m out of the loop on this project; can you give me an update?”
  • Someone might admit, “I feel out of the loop when it comes to pop culture; I don’t watch much TV.”

30. Out of step

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is not in harmony with the prevailing attitudes or beliefs.

  • For example, “His views on that topic are out of step with the majority.”
  • A friend might say, “You’re out of step with the latest fashion trends; everyone is wearing bright colors.”
  • A coworker might comment, “His management style is out of step with the company’s values.”

31. Out of sync

This term is used to describe something that is not in harmony or agreement with something else.

  • For example, “The audio and video were out of sync during the live performance.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t dance well because I was out of sync with the music.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might mention, “If we’re out of sync, our project won’t be successful.”

32. Out of the picture

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something is no longer a part of a situation or no longer considered important.

  • For instance, “After the scandal, the CEO was out of the picture.”
  • A person might say, “Since I quit my job, I’m out of the picture when it comes to office politics.”
  • In a discussion about a group project, someone might mention, “Once the team leader left, he was out of the picture.”

33. Out of circulation

This term refers to something that is no longer being produced, distributed, or used.

  • For example, “That book is out of circulation, so it’s hard to find.”
  • A person might say, “Vinyl records are making a comeback, even though they were once out of circulation.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might mention, “With the release of the new model, the older version will soon be out of circulation.”

34. Out of the running

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is no longer considered a potential winner or competitor.

  • For instance, “After losing two games in a row, they were out of the running for the championship.”
  • A person might say, “Once I injured my knee, I knew I was out of the running for the race.”
  • In a discussion about job applications, someone might mention, “If you don’t meet the minimum qualifications, you’ll be out of the running for the position.”

35. Out of the game

This term is used to describe someone who is no longer actively participating in a particular activity or endeavor.

  • For example, “After his injury, he was out of the game for several months.”
  • A person might say, “I used to play basketball, but now I’m out of the game.”
  • In a conversation about retirement, someone might mention, “Once you leave the workforce, you’re officially out of the game.”

36. Out of service

When something is “out of service,” it means that it is no longer in use or functioning. This term is often used to describe equipment or facilities that are temporarily or permanently unavailable.

  • For example, a sign on a broken elevator might read, “Out of service. Please use the stairs.”
  • If a public restroom is closed for cleaning, a sign might say, “Out of service. Please use the restroom on the next floor.”
  • A person might complain, “The ATM is out of service again. I can never withdraw cash when I need it.”

37. Out of order

When something is “out of order,” it means that it is not working correctly or as intended. This term is often used to describe machines, appliances, or systems that are malfunctioning.

  • For instance, a sign on a broken vending machine might say, “Out of order. Please use another machine.”
  • If a public telephone is not functioning, a sign might read, “Out of order. Please use a different phone.”
  • A person might say, “The printer is out of order. I can’t print my documents right now.”