Top 40 Slang For Chicken – Meaning & Usage

Chicken, a staple in many cuisines around the world, has its own set of slang terms that may leave some people scratching their heads. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang words for chicken that will not only have you clucking with laughter but also make you the life of the party when it comes to poultry-related conversations. So, whether you’re a foodie or just someone looking to expand their vocabulary, get ready to dive into the fascinating world of chicken slang!

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1. Bird

This term is commonly used to refer to a chicken in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I’m making some delicious bird for dinner tonight.”
  • In a discussion about different types of poultry, someone might say, “I prefer duck over bird.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know any good recipes for cooking bird?”

2. Yardbird

This term originated in the southern United States and is commonly used to refer to a chicken.

  • For instance, “I’m frying up some yardbird for Sunday dinner.”
  • In a conversation about traditional southern cuisine, someone might say, “Fried yardbird is a classic dish.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you ever tried yardbird gumbo?”

3. Chook

This term is commonly used in Australia to refer to a chicken.

  • For example, “I’m going to cook a chook for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about Australian cuisine, someone might say, “Chook is a popular ingredient in many Australian dishes.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find a good chook recipe?”

4. Clucker

This term is commonly used in urban settings to refer to a chicken.

  • For instance, “I need to buy a clucker for my backyard.”
  • In a conversation about raising chickens in the city, someone might say, “I love hearing the cluckers in the morning.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know any good clucker coops for sale?”

5. Hen

This term specifically refers to a female chicken.

  • For example, “I have a hen that lays delicious eggs.”
  • In a discussion about different types of poultry, someone might say, “Hens are typically smaller than roosters.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s the best way to care for a hen?”

6. Rooster

This is a term used to refer to an adult male chicken. It is often used in the context of cockfighting or to describe the male of a bird species.

  • For example, “The rooster crowed at the break of dawn.”
  • In a discussion about farming, someone might mention, “Roosters are often kept to protect the flock.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically, saying, “He struts around like a proud rooster.”

7. Fryer

A fryer is a young chicken that is typically between 7 and 12 weeks old and weighs about 2.5 to 4.5 pounds. It is often used for frying or roasting.

  • For instance, “I’m going to make fried chicken using a fryer.”
  • In a recipe, someone might say, “Use a fryer for best results.”
  • A person might mention, “Fryers are known for their tender meat.”

8. Broiler

A broiler is a chicken that is specifically raised and prepared for broiling, which is a cooking method that involves direct heat from above. Broilers are typically young and tender.

  • For example, “I’m going to broil a broiler for dinner.”
  • In a cooking class, someone might say, “Broilers are great for quick and easy meals.”
  • A person might mention, “Broilers are often used in restaurants for their fast cooking time.”

9. Poulet

Poulet is the French word for chicken. It is often used in culinary contexts or to describe dishes made with chicken.

  • For instance, “I’m making coq au vin, which is a traditional French dish made with poulet.”
  • In a French restaurant, someone might say, “Our menu features various poulet dishes.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a chicken dish they had, saying, “I had the most delicious poulet last night.”

10. Pollo

Pollo is the Spanish word for chicken. It is commonly used in Spanish cuisine and to describe dishes that feature chicken as the main ingredient.

  • For example, “I’m going to make pollo asado, which is a popular Spanish grilled chicken dish.”
  • In a Mexican restaurant, someone might say, “Our menu offers a variety of pollo options.”
  • A person might mention, “Pollo is a versatile meat that can be used in many different recipes.”

11. Poultry

This term refers to domesticated birds that are raised for their meat, eggs, or feathers. It is a more formal term for chicken, often used in culinary contexts.

  • For example, a recipe might call for “seasoned poultry” instead of specifically mentioning chicken.
  • A chef might say, “Poultry is a versatile protein that can be prepared in many different ways.”
  • In a discussion about farming, someone might mention, “Poultry farming is a major industry in many countries.”

12. Fowl

This term is a general word for any domesticated or wild bird, including chickens. It is a more old-fashioned or formal term for chicken, often used in literature or historical contexts.

  • For instance, a novel set in the past might mention a character raising fowl on their farm.
  • A person discussing traditional farming methods might say, “Back in the day, people relied on fowl for eggs and meat.”
  • In a discussion about bird species, someone might mention, “Chickens are a type of fowl.”

13. Yard bird

This term is a colloquialism for chicken, often used in rural or Southern American dialects. It refers to chickens that are raised in a backyard or small farm setting.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s have some yard bird for dinner tonight.”
  • In a conversation about self-sustainability, someone might mention, “I raise my own yard birds for fresh eggs.”
  • A farmer might say, “Yard birds are a low-maintenance livestock option for small-scale farming.”

14. Yard chicken

This term is a colloquialism for chicken, similar to “yard bird.” It is often used in rural or Southern American dialects to refer to chickens that are raised in a backyard or small farm setting.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m frying up some yard chicken for lunch.”
  • In a discussion about farm-to-table dining, a chef might say, “We source our yard chickens from local farms.”
  • A person might mention, “Yard chickens are known for their flavorful meat.”

15. Yard fowl

This term is a colloquialism for chicken, similar to “yard bird” and “yard chicken.” It is often used in rural or Southern American dialects to refer to chickens that are raised in a backyard or small farm setting.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to catch a yard fowl for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about sustainable living, someone might say, “Raising yard fowls is a great way to have a steady supply of eggs.”
  • A person might mention, “Yard fowls are free-range and have a more natural diet.”

16. Yard chicklet

A “yard chicklet” refers to a young chicken or a chick that is being raised in a backyard or small farm. It is often used to differentiate between adult chickens and their offspring.

  • For example, a farmer might say, “We have a new batch of yard chicklets in the coop.”
  • A person discussing their backyard chickens might mention, “One of our yard chicklets just started laying eggs.”
  • In a conversation about raising chickens, someone might ask, “How long does it take for yard chicklets to reach maturity?”

17. Yard chickling

Similar to a “yard chicklet,” a “yard chickling” is another term for a baby chicken or chick. It is often used to describe chickens that are still small and dependent on their mother or caretaker.

  • For instance, a farmer might say, “We have a brood of yard chicklings hatching soon.”
  • A person sharing pictures of their backyard chickens might caption a photo, “Look at this adorable yard chickling!”
  • In a discussion about raising backyard chickens, someone might ask, “What is the best way to care for yard chicklings?”

18. Yard cock

A “yard cock” is a colloquial term for a male chicken. It is often used to refer to roosters or adult male chickens that are kept in a backyard or small farm setting.

  • For example, a farmer might say, “We have a yard cock that protects the hens from predators.”
  • A person discussing their backyard chickens might mention, “Our yard cock is quite vocal in the morning.”
  • In a conversation about breeding chickens, someone might ask, “How do you introduce a new yard cock to the flock?”

19. Yard cockerel

A “yard cockerel” refers to a young male chicken or a rooster that is being raised in a backyard or small farm. It is often used to differentiate between adult roosters and their offspring.

  • For instance, a farmer might say, “We have a group of yard cockerels that will soon start crowing.”
  • A person sharing their experience of raising backyard chickens might mention, “Our yard cockerel is growing larger every day.”
  • In a discussion about chicken breeds, someone might ask, “What are the characteristics of a yard cockerel compared to an adult rooster?”

20. Yard pullet

A “yard pullet” refers to a young female chicken or a hen that is being raised in a backyard or small farm. It is often used to differentiate between adult hens and their offspring.

  • For example, a farmer might say, “We have a flock of yard pullets that will start laying eggs soon.”
  • A person discussing their backyard chickens might mention, “Our yard pullet just laid her first egg.”
  • In a conversation about raising chickens, someone might ask, “How long does it take for yard pullets to reach maturity and start laying eggs?”

21. Yard roo

This term is a slang for chicken, specifically referring to a chicken that is raised in a yard or backyard setting.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to grill some yard roo for dinner tonight.”
  • A person discussing their homegrown food might mention, “I have a flock of yard roo in my backyard.”
  • In a recipe, you might see instructions like, “Add diced yard roo to the stir-fry.”

22. Yard roo bird

This term is a slang for chicken, specifically referring to a chicken that is raised in a yard or backyard setting. The addition of “bird” emphasizes the avian nature of the animal.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m frying up some yard roo bird for lunch.”
  • A person sharing their farm life might post, “I love waking up to the sound of yard roo birds in the morning.”
  • In a conversation about sustainable living, someone might mention, “I raise my own yard roo birds for eggs and meat.”

23. Yard roo chicken

This term is a slang for chicken, specifically referring to a chicken that is raised in a yard or backyard setting. The addition of “chicken” reinforces the animal being referenced.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m making a delicious yard roo chicken soup.”
  • A person sharing their cooking experience might write, “I prefer the taste of yard roo chicken over store-bought.”
  • In a discussion about organic farming, someone might say, “I choose to raise yard roo chickens for their superior flavor and quality.”

24. Yard roo fowl

This term is a slang for chicken, specifically referring to a chicken that is raised in a yard or backyard setting. The use of “fowl” is a more general term for a bird, but in this context, it still refers to a chicken.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a flock of yard roo fowl in my backyard.”
  • A person discussing their sustainable lifestyle might mention, “I raise my own yard roo fowl for eggs and meat.”
  • In a conversation about different poultry breeds, someone might ask, “Do yard roo fowl lay larger eggs than other chickens?”

25. Yard roo hen

This term is a slang for chicken, specifically referring to a female chicken that is raised in a yard or backyard setting. The use of “hen” specifically denotes the gender of the chicken.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to roast a yard roo hen for dinner.”
  • A person discussing their self-sufficiency might mention, “I have a yard roo hen that lays fresh eggs every day.”
  • In a recipe, you might see instructions like, “Use the meat from a yard roo hen for a flavorful curry.”

26. Yard roo rooster

A male chicken, known for its distinctive crowing sound. “Rooster” is a common term used to refer to the male counterpart of a chicken.

  • For example, on a farm, you might hear the rooster crow at the break of dawn.
  • In a discussion about farm animals, someone might say, “The rooster protects the flock of hens.”
  • A person describing a farm scene might mention, “The rooster strutted proudly in the yard.”

27. Yard roo poultry

A general term used to describe domesticated birds raised for their meat or eggs. “Poultry” encompasses various types of birds, including chickens.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I prefer to eat poultry rather than red meat.”
  • In a recipe, you might see an ingredient listed as “poultry seasoning.”
  • A person discussing farming might mention, “Poultry farming is a significant industry in many countries.”

28. Yard roo clucker

A female chicken, often used to refer to a mature female bird. “Clucker” is a colloquial term used to describe a hen, which is known for its clucking sound.

  • For example, a person might say, “The clucker laid an egg this morning.”
  • In a discussion about farming, someone might mention, “The hens provide us with fresh eggs.”
  • A person describing a farm scene might say, “The cluckers were pecking at the ground.”

29. Yard roo chook

The common term used to refer to a domesticated bird that is raised for meat or eggs. “Chook” is a slang term often used in Australian English to describe a chicken.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s have a barbecue and grill some chooks.”
  • In a recipe, you might see an ingredient listed as “chook pieces.”
  • A person discussing farming might mention, “Chook farming is a popular industry in Australia.”

30. Yard roo birdie

A general term used to describe domesticated birds raised for their meat or eggs. “Birdie” is a colloquial term often used to refer to poultry, including chickens.

  • For example, a person might say, “I enjoy eating birdie dishes like roasted chicken.”
  • In a recipe, you might see an ingredient listed as “birdie breast.”
  • A person discussing farming might mention, “The birdie industry plays a significant role in the local economy.”

31. Yard roo birdy

This term refers to a chicken that is kept in a yard or backyard.

  • For example, “I saw a yard roo birdy pecking at the ground in my neighbor’s yard.”
  • A person discussing backyard farming might say, “I’m thinking of getting some yard roo birdies for fresh eggs.”
  • In a conversation about different chicken breeds, someone might ask, “What’s the best breed of yard roo birdy for meat production?”

32. Yard roo biddy

This term specifically refers to a female chicken that is kept in a yard or backyard.

  • For instance, “The yard roo biddy laid an egg this morning.”
  • In a discussion about chicken behavior, someone might mention, “Yard roo biddies are known to be protective of their chicks.”
  • A person talking about their backyard flock might say, “I have a few yard roo biddies that provide us with fresh eggs every day.”

33. Yardie

This term is slang for a chicken that is raised in a yard or backyard.

  • For example, “We’re raising a few yardies for meat.”
  • In a conversation about sustainable living, someone might mention, “I prefer yardies because I know how they were raised.”
  • A person discussing the benefits of backyard chickens might say, “Having yardies allows us to have fresh eggs and reduce food waste.”

34. Yardie bird

This term is slang for a bird, specifically a chicken, that is raised in a yard or backyard.

  • For instance, “We have a few yardie birds in our backyard.”
  • In a discussion about urban farming, someone might say, “I’m planning to raise yardie birds for eggs and meat.”
  • A person talking about their backyard flock might mention, “We love our yardie birds because they provide us with fresh, organic eggs.”

35. Biddy

This term is slang for a small chicken, often used to refer to a young or immature chicken.

  • For example, “The biddy is still too young to lay eggs.”
  • In a conversation about different chicken breeds, someone might mention, “Biddies are known for their docile nature.”
  • A person discussing backyard chickens might say, “I started with a few biddies and now have a full flock of adults.”

36. Yardie fowl

This term refers to a chicken in Jamaican slang. It is commonly used in the Jamaican community to refer to a chicken, particularly in the context of Jamaican cuisine and culture.

  • For example, “I’m craving some jerk yardie fowl for dinner tonight.”
  • A Jamaican restaurant might advertise, “Try our delicious yardie fowl curry.”
  • A Jamaican chef might say, “The secret to a perfect yardie fowl stew is slow cooking it with traditional Jamaican spices.”

37. Yardie clucker

Similar to “yardie fowl,” this term is used in Jamaican slang to refer to a chicken. It is often used interchangeably with “yardie fowl” and is also associated with Jamaican cuisine and culture.

  • For instance, “Let’s make some spicy yardie clucker wings for the party.”
  • A Jamaican food enthusiast might say, “I love the flavor of yardie clucker in my jerk chicken.”
  • A person describing their favorite Jamaican dish might mention, “The yardie clucker curry is a must-try.”

38. Yardie hen

This term specifically refers to a female chicken in Jamaican slang. It is used to differentiate between male and female chickens in the context of Jamaican cuisine and culture.

  • For example, “The yardie hen lays delicious eggs for breakfast.”
  • A Jamaican farmer might say, “I have a flock of yardie hens for egg production.”
  • A person discussing traditional Jamaican recipes might mention, “Using yardie hen in the curry adds a unique flavor.”

39. Yardie rooster

Similar to “yardie hen,” this term specifically refers to a male chicken in Jamaican slang. It is used to differentiate between male and female chickens in the context of Jamaican cuisine and culture.

  • For instance, “The yardie rooster’s crow wakes us up every morning.”
  • A Jamaican farmer might say, “I have a yardie rooster to protect the flock.”
  • A person describing a traditional Jamaican dish might mention, “Using yardie rooster in the stew adds a rich flavor.”

40. Yardie biddy

This term is used in Jamaican slang to refer to a small chicken, often a young one. It is commonly used in the context of Jamaican cuisine and culture.

  • For example, “Let’s grill some yardie biddy for a quick and tasty meal.”
  • A Jamaican chef might say, “Using yardie biddy in the soup adds a tender texture.”
  • A person describing a traditional Jamaican dish might mention, “The yardie biddy curry is a popular choice for its delicate flavor.”
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