Top 41 Slang For Running Fast – Meaning & Usage

Looking to add some zing to your running vocabulary? Look no further! We’ve rounded up the top slang for running fast that will have you feeling like you’re flying on the track. Whether you’re a seasoned sprinter or just getting started, these expressions will give you an extra boost of speed and a whole lot of swagger. Lace up your shoes and get ready to zoom through this listicle!

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1. Full steam ahead

This phrase is often used to describe running at full speed or with great intensity. It implies that the person is giving their all and putting in maximum effort.

  • For example, “He sprinted full steam ahead towards the finish line.”
  • A coach might say, “Give it your all and go full steam ahead!”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She’s running full steam ahead and leaving her competitors behind.”

2. Flat out

This term is used to describe running at top speed or with great urgency. It suggests that the person is running as fast as they can, giving it their all.

  • For instance, “He was running flat out to catch the train.”
  • A coach might say, “Push yourself and run flat out!”
  • In a race, a spectator might shout, “Go, go, go! Run flat out!”

3. At a rate of knots

This phrase is commonly used to describe running at a rapid pace. It implies that the person is moving quickly and covering a lot of ground.

  • For example, “She ran at a rate of knots to catch up with her friends.”
  • A runner might say, “I was running at a rate of knots and felt unstoppable.”
  • During a race, a commentator might say, “He’s running at a rate of knots and leaving his competitors behind.”

4. Breakneck

This term is used to describe running at an extremely fast pace, often implying a sense of danger or recklessness. It suggests that the person is running so fast that they could potentially lose control.

  • For instance, “He ran down the hill at breakneck speed.”
  • A coach might warn, “Be careful not to run at breakneck speed without proper control.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She’s running at breakneck speed, but can she maintain it?”

5. Blistering

This word is used to describe running at an exceptionally fast pace. It suggests that the person is running so fast that it is impressive and awe-inspiring.

  • For example, “He ran a blistering pace and set a new record.”
  • A coach might say, “Keep up the blistering speed and leave your competitors behind!”
  • During a race, a spectator might exclaim, “Wow, she’s running at a blistering pace!”

6. Nimble

Nimble is a term used to describe someone who is quick and agile in their movements. It can be used to describe someone who is running fast.

  • For example, “He quickly dodged the defenders and showed off his nimble footwork.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She’s known for her nimble strides and ability to change direction quickly.”
  • A coach might praise a player by saying, “His nimble speed makes him a valuable asset on the field.”

7. Quick-fire

Quick-fire is a term used to describe something that is done rapidly or with great speed. In the context of running fast, it can be used to describe someone’s quick and speedy movements.

  • For instance, “He executed a quick-fire start and left his competitors in the dust.”
  • A trainer might instruct their athletes to “focus on their quick-fire sprints to improve their overall speed.”
  • A commentator might say, “Her quick-fire strides are propelling her to the front of the pack.”

8. Rapid

Rapid is a term used to describe something that is happening quickly or at a high speed. When applied to running, it signifies someone moving fast and swiftly.

  • For example, “He set a rapid pace and left his competitors struggling to keep up.”
  • In a relay race, a coach might say, “We need a rapid handoff to maintain our lead.”
  • A runner might describe their performance by saying, “I had a rapid start and maintained my speed throughout the race.”

9. Speed demon

Speed demon is a term used to describe someone who is exceptionally fast and often leaves others in awe of their speed. It is commonly used to describe a runner who is incredibly fast.

  • For instance, “He’s a real speed demon on the track, consistently setting new records.”
  • A commentator might say, “Watch out for this speed demon in the upcoming race, as he’s known for his explosive starts.”
  • A teammate might cheer on their speed demon friend by saying, “Go, speed demon, go!”

10. Zooming

Zooming is a term used to describe someone or something moving swiftly and quickly. When applied to running, it signifies someone running at a high speed.

  • For example, “He came zooming past the finish line, breaking the record.”
  • A coach might encourage their athletes by saying, “Keep zooming towards the finish line, you’re almost there!”
  • A runner might describe their experience by saying, “I felt like I was zooming through the race, everything was a blur.”

11. Lightning-fast

This term is used to describe someone or something that moves or runs at an incredibly high speed. It implies that the speed is comparable to that of lightning, which is known for its quickness.

  • For example, “Usain Bolt is known for his lightning-fast sprints.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She took off at a lightning-fast pace.”
  • A friend might compliment a runner by saying, “You were lightning-fast in that race!”

12. Turbocharged

This term is often used to describe someone who is running or moving at a very fast pace. It suggests that the person is powered by a turbocharger, a device that increases the speed and power of an engine.

  • For instance, “He ran like he was turbocharged and left everyone behind.”
  • In a discussion about running, someone might say, “I need to get in shape so I can run turbocharged.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s run like we’re turbocharged and leave our opponents in the dust!”

13. Speeding bullet

This phrase is used to describe someone who is running or moving extremely fast, comparable to the speed of a bullet. It emphasizes the incredible speed and velocity of the person.

  • For example, “He sprinted across the finish line like a speeding bullet.”
  • In a conversation about running, someone might say, “I wish I could run like a speeding bullet.”
  • A coach might encourage their athlete by saying, “Imagine yourself as a speeding bullet, unstoppable and swift!”

14. Bolt

This term is derived from the name of the famous sprinter Usain Bolt. It is used to describe running at maximum speed or sprinting. The term “bolt” implies a sudden and rapid movement.

  • For instance, “She bolted out of the starting blocks and took an early lead.”
  • In a discussion about running technique, someone might say, “Make sure to drive your knees forward when you bolt.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s bolt to the finish line together!”

15. Zoom

This term is used to describe someone who is moving or running at a fast pace. It suggests rapid movement and speed, similar to the sound or action of zooming.

  • For example, “He zoomed past his competitors and won the race.”
  • In a conversation about running, someone might say, “I need to increase my endurance so I can zoom for longer distances.”
  • A coach might instruct their athlete by saying, “Lean forward and focus on your form to maintain a strong zoom.”

16. Fly

To “fly” means to run at a fast pace. It is often used to describe someone who is running so fast that they appear to be flying.

  • For example, “He flew past the finish line and won the race.”
  • A coach might say, “I want you to fly down the field and score a goal.”
  • In a race, a spectator might shout, “Look at her fly!”

17. Whiz

To “whiz” means to move swiftly or quickly. It is often used to describe someone running at a high speed.

  • For instance, “He whizzed past me on the track.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw you whiz by during the race.”
  • A coach might encourage their team, saying, “Let’s whiz past the competition and win this race!”

18. Hightail it

To “hightail it” means to run away quickly or flee from a situation. It implies a sense of urgency or the need to escape.

  • For example, “When the alarm went off, we hightailed it out of the building.”
  • Someone might say, “I saw him hightail it out of there after the incident.”
  • In a movie, a character might declare, “If things get dangerous, we’ll hightail it out of here!”

19. Burn rubber

To “burn rubber” means to run or drive at a high speed, often resulting in the tires of a vehicle leaving skid marks on the road.

  • For instance, “He burned rubber as he accelerated away from the traffic light.”
  • Someone might say, “I love the feeling of burning rubber when I take off in my car.”
  • A friend might ask, “Wanna go for a drive and burn some rubber?”

20. Hustle

To “hustle” means to move quickly and energetically, often with a sense of purpose or urgency.

  • For example, “She hustled to catch the bus before it left.”
  • A coach might say, “I want to see you hustle down the court and score some points.”
  • In a race, a participant might encourage themselves, saying, “Keep hustling, you’re almost there!”

21. Zip

To move quickly or swiftly. The term “zip” is often used to describe a fast and efficient movement.

  • For example, “She zipped past her competitors and won the race.”
  • A person might say, “I need to zip through this work so I can leave early.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might mention, “I love to zip around the city on a scooter.”

22. Dart

To run or move suddenly and quickly in a specific direction. “Dart” is often used to describe a sudden burst of speed or movement.

  • For instance, “The rabbit darted across the field, leaving the dogs behind.”
  • In a conversation about agility, someone might say, “He has the ability to dart around defenders on the soccer field.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I need to dart to the store before it closes!”

23. Race

To participate in a competition or contest to see who can run the fastest. “Race” is commonly used to describe a competitive running event.

  • For example, “She trained hard to race in the upcoming marathon.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “I love to watch the Olympic races.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you planning to race in the 5K next month?”

24. Gallop

To run or move at a fast pace, similar to the gait of a horse. “Gallop” is often used to describe a rapid and rhythmic running motion.

  • For instance, “The children galloped across the field, laughing and playing.”
  • In a conversation about animals, someone might mention, “Horses can gallop at incredible speeds.”
  • A person might say, “I love the feeling of galloping through an open field.”

25. Charge

To run or move quickly and forcefully, often with a sense of purpose or determination. “Charge” is often used to describe a swift and powerful running motion.

  • For example, “The football player charged towards the end zone, dodging defenders.”
  • In a discussion about military tactics, someone might say, “The soldiers charged towards the enemy.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I need to charge up this hill!”

26. Barrel

To barrel means to run at full speed or to move quickly and forcefully. The term is often used to describe someone running with great intensity or urgency.

  • For example, a coach might say, “He barreled down the field and scored the winning touchdown.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She’s barreling towards the finish line, leaving her competitors behind.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw him barreling through the park, trying to catch the bus.”

27. Streak

To streak means to run very fast or to move swiftly. This term is often used to describe someone running with great speed and agility.

  • For instance, a spectator might comment, “He streaked past the other runners and won the race.”
  • In a sports competition, a commentator might say, “She’s on a streak, breaking records with every race.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw her streaking down the street like a blur.”

28. Lightning

To run like lightning means to run with incredible speed or to move as fast as lightning. This term is often used to describe someone running at an exceptionally fast pace.

  • For example, a coach might say, “He’s as fast as lightning on the track.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She’s running like lightning, leaving her competitors in the dust.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw him sprinting like lightning to catch the train.”

29. Fleet-footed

Fleet-footed means to run swiftly or to have the ability to run quickly. This term is often used to describe someone who is agile and fast on their feet.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “She’s known for her fleet-footedness on the soccer field.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “He’s a fleet-footed runner, always one step ahead of the competition.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t keep up with her, she’s too fleet-footed for me.”

30. Tear up the track

To tear up the track means to run at a very high speed or to sprint with great intensity. This term is often used to describe someone running so fast that they leave a mark or impression on the track.

  • For example, a coach might say, “He tore up the track and set a new record.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She’s tearing up the track, leaving her competitors in awe.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw him tearing up the track like a bullet.”

31. Swift

This word is often used to describe someone or something that moves quickly or with agility. In the context of running fast, “swift” refers to a rapid pace or movement.

  • For example, a coach might say, “She has a swift stride and can cover a lot of ground.”
  • In a race, a commentator might exclaim, “Look at her go! She’s so swift!”
  • A runner might boast, “I’m feeling swift today, I think I can beat my personal record!”

32. Rush

To “rush” in the context of running fast means to move quickly and with great speed. It implies a sense of urgency or intensity in the movement.

  • For instance, a track coach might say, “During the last lap, give it your all and rush to the finish line!”
  • In a relay race, a teammate might shout, “Go, go, go! Rush to the next runner!”
  • A runner might describe their sprinting ability by saying, “I have a strong rush, I can accelerate quickly.”

33. Bound

When used as slang for running fast, “bound” refers to a rapid and energetic movement. It implies a sense of springiness or leaping in each stride.

  • For example, a runner might say, “I feel like I can bound across the track!”
  • During a race, a spectator might cheer, “Look at her bound towards the finish line!”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Keep up the bound, you’re doing great!”

34. Jog

While “jog” typically refers to a slower and more relaxed pace, in the context of running fast, it can be used to describe a light and quick run. It implies a moderate speed that is faster than a leisurely jog.

  • For instance, a runner might say, “I’m going for a quick jog to warm up before the race.”
  • During a training session, a coach might instruct, “Jog for a few minutes to recover, then pick up the pace.”
  • A runner might describe their running routine by saying, “I start with a jog and gradually increase my speed.”

35. Zoomies

This playful term is often used to describe a burst of speed or an energetic sprint. It conveys a sense of excitement and enthusiasm in running fast.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Let’s have a race and see who can do the zoomies the fastest!”
  • During a track event, a commentator might say, “He’s got the zoomies! Look at him go!”
  • A runner might describe their running style by saying, “I love the feeling of the zoomies when I give it my all.”

36. Dash like the wind

This phrase is used to describe someone running at a high speed, often with a sense of agility and ease.

  • For example, “He dashed like the wind to catch the bus before it left.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “She’s dashing like the wind, leaving her competitors behind.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s dash like the wind and finish strong!”

37. Zoom like a bullet

This expression compares someone’s speed to that of a bullet, emphasizing their rapid movement.

  • For instance, “He zoomed like a bullet past the other runners in the race.”
  • In a car race, a spectator might comment, “Those cars are zooming like bullets on the track.”
  • A parent might playfully say to their child, “Eat your vegetables so you can zoom like a bullet!”

38. Dash like a gazelle

This phrase likens someone’s running to the swift and graceful movements of a gazelle, emphasizing their speed and agility.

  • For example, “She dashed like a gazelle through the forest, effortlessly leaping over obstacles.”
  • During a soccer game, a commentator might say, “He’s dashing like a gazelle, leaving the defenders in awe of his speed.”
  • A runner might motivate themselves by saying, “I’m going to dash like a gazelle and set a new personal record!”

39. Speed like a gazelle

This expression highlights someone’s speed by comparing it to the fast movements of a gazelle.

  • For instance, “She sped like a gazelle across the finish line, breaking the previous record.”
  • In a nature documentary, the narrator might say, “Watch as the cheetah speeds like a gazelle to catch its prey.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s speed like gazelles and dominate the game!”

40. Run like the wind

This phrase suggests running with great speed, as if propelled by the wind.

  • For example, “He ran like the wind to catch up with his friends.”
  • During a track and field event, a commentator might say, “She’s running like the wind, leaving her competitors in her dust.”
  • A friend might cheer on another by saying, “You’ve got this! Run like the wind and finish strong!”

41. Blaze a trail

This phrase is often used to describe someone running at a very fast pace or setting a new speed record. It can also be used metaphorically to mean being the first to do something or setting a new trend.

  • For example, “He blazed a trail in the race and finished first.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “Usain Bolt blazed a trail in the world of sprinting.”
  • A person describing a new fashion trend might say, “She blazed a trail with her unique style.”
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