Top 64 Slang For Cold – Meaning & Usage

When the chilly winds start blowing and the temperatures drop, it’s time to break out the cozy sweaters and hot cocoa. But what about the slang for cold? From shiver me timbers to freezing my buns off, we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang phrases for cold. So grab a warm blanket and get ready to learn some cool new expressions to describe the frosty weather!

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1. Arctic Outside

This term is used to describe weather conditions that are extremely cold, often referring to temperatures resembling those found in the Arctic region.

  • For example, “It’s so cold outside, it feels like the Arctic!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go out in this Arctic weather without my heavy coat.”
  • Someone might comment, “The wind chill makes it feel even more Arctic outside.”

2. Baltic

This slang term is used to describe weather that is very cold or freezing, often associated with the cold temperatures experienced in the Baltic region.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe how Baltic it is today!”
  • A person might say, “I need to bundle up, it’s Baltic out there.”
  • Someone might comment, “The Baltic winds are making it even colder.”

3. Bitter

This term is used to describe weather that is uncomfortably cold, often characterized by biting winds and low temperatures.

  • For example, “The wind is making it feel bitter outside.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand this bitter cold, I need to stay indoors.”
  • Someone might comment, “The bitter temperatures are freezing everything.”

4. Blustery

This slang term is used to describe weather that is both windy and cold, often associated with gusty winds and low temperatures.

  • For instance, “It’s a blustery day, make sure to wear a warm coat!”
  • A person might say, “The blustery wind is making it even colder.”
  • Someone might comment, “The blustery conditions are making it difficult to walk outside.”

5. Bone-Chilling

This term is used to describe weather that is extremely cold and makes a person feel chilled to the bone.

  • For example, “The wind is bone-chilling, I can’t stay outside for long.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle this bone-chilling cold, I need to find some warmth.”
  • Someone might comment, “The bone-chilling temperatures are freezing everything in sight.”

6. Brass Monkey Weather

This phrase originated from the expression “cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey.” It is used to describe weather that is bitterly cold.

  • For example, “It’s brass monkey weather outside, make sure to bundle up.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand this brass monkey weather, I’m staying indoors.”
  • During a cold snap, someone might comment, “This is definitely brass monkey weather we’re experiencing.”

7. Brick

This slang term is used to describe extremely cold temperatures.

  • For instance, “It’s so brick outside, I can’t feel my fingers.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not leaving the house until it warms up, it’s brick out there.”
  • In a conversation about the weather, someone might comment, “I can’t believe how brick it is today.”

8. Chilly

This word is often used to describe a cool or cold temperature, but not as extreme as “brisk” or “freezing.”

  • For example, “It’s a bit chilly outside, you might want to bring a jacket.”
  • A person might say, “I love the chilly weather, it’s perfect for cozying up with a book.”
  • Someone might comment, “The mornings are starting to get chilly, fall is definitely here.”

9. Crule

This slang term is used to describe extremely cold temperatures, similar to “brass monkey weather” or “brick.”

  • For instance, “I can’t believe how crule it is outside, I can hardly breathe.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not leaving the house until this crule weather passes.”
  • In a discussion about winter, someone might comment, “I can’t handle the crule temperatures, I’m ready for spring.”

10. Dead of Winter

This phrase refers to the coldest period during the winter season.

  • For example, “We’re in the dead of winter now, it’s only going to get colder.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait for the dead of winter to be over, I’m tired of bundling up.”
  • Someone might comment, “I love the dead of winter, it’s the perfect time for skiing and snowboarding.”

11. Freezing

This word is used to describe weather or temperatures that are very cold. It can also be used to describe a person feeling extremely cold.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside, it’s freezing out there!”
  • A person might say, “I’m freezing, can we turn up the heat?”
  • When describing a cold drink, someone might say, “This soda is freezing cold!”

12. Hapwarm

This slang term is used to describe the feeling of warmth or coziness in cold weather. It refers to the relief or comfort that comes from being in a warm environment.

  • For instance, “I love sitting by the fireplace, it’s so hapwarm.”
  • Someone might say, “This blanket is so soft and hapwarm.”
  • When describing a cozy cabin in the winter, a person might say, “It’s the perfect place for a hapwarm getaway.”

13. Nippy

This term is used to describe weather or temperatures that are chilly or brisk. It can also be used to describe a person feeling cold.

  • For example, “It’s a bit nippy outside, you might want to wear a jacket.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling nippy, can we turn up the heat?”
  • When describing a cold wind, someone might say, “The wind is really nippy today!”

14. Nithered

This slang term is used to describe weather or temperatures that are extremely cold. It can also be used to describe a person feeling extremely cold.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe how nithered it is outside!”
  • A person might say, “I’m absolutely nithered, I need to find some warmth.”
  • When describing a freezing cold room, someone might say, “This place is nithered, I can’t stand it!”

15. Tater

This word is used to describe the act of shivering or shaking due to the cold. It can also be used to describe a person feeling cold and visibly shaking.

  • For example, “I forgot my coat and now I’m tatering.”
  • A person might say, “I’m tatering, can we go inside?”
  • When describing someone who is visibly cold and shaking, someone might say, “Look at them, they’re tatering!”

16. Frosty

Frosty is a slang term used to describe very cold weather or temperatures. It can also be used to describe a person who is unfriendly or cold in demeanor.

  • For example, “I walked outside and instantly felt the frosty air hit my face.”
  • A person might say, “He gave me a frosty reception when I tried to talk to him.”
  • Another might comment, “The weather forecast says it’s going to be frosty tonight, so bundle up!”

17. Icy

Icy is a slang term used to describe extremely cold temperatures or weather conditions. It can also be used to describe a person who is cold-hearted or emotionless.

  • For instance, “The ground was covered in icy patches, making it dangerous to walk.”
  • Someone might say, “She had an icy stare that sent shivers down my spine.”
  • Another might comment, “Icy conditions on the roads caused multiple accidents today.”

18. Frigid

Frigid is a slang term used to describe extremely cold temperatures or weather. It can also be used to describe a person who is unemotional or lacks warmth.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside without a jacket, it’s too frigid.”
  • A person might say, “She has a frigid personality, never showing any affection.”
  • Another might comment, “The frigid winter weather is making it hard to stay warm.”

19. Brrr

Brrr is an onomatopoeic slang term used to represent the sound one makes when they feel cold or shiver. It is often used to express the feeling of cold weather or a chilly environment.

  • For instance, “Brrr, it’s freezing in here! Can we turn up the heat?”
  • Someone might say, “I walked outside and immediately went ‘brrr’ because of the cold.”
  • Another might comment, “Brrr, I can’t stand this cold weather anymore!”

20. Shivery

Shivery is a slang term used to describe the feeling of being cold or experiencing chills. It can also be used to describe something that is eerie or unsettling.

  • For example, “I had a shivery sensation as the cold wind blew through my coat.”
  • A person might say, “The horror movie gave me shivery nightmares.”
  • Another might comment, “The shivery atmosphere of the haunted house gave me goosebumps.”

21. Arctic

Arctic refers to extremely cold temperatures or conditions. It is often used to describe a harsh, icy environment.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside without a heavy jacket, it’s Arctic out there!”
  • Someone might say, “The wind chill makes it feel like the Arctic in here.”
  • A person might describe a particularly cold room as, “It’s like stepping into the Arctic in this office.”

22. Gelid

Gelid is a term used to describe something extremely cold or icy. It can be used to describe both weather conditions and objects.

  • For instance, “I slipped on the gelid sidewalk this morning.”
  • A person might say, “The gelid water made my fingers numb.”
  • Someone might describe a freezing cold room as, “The air in here is gelid.”

23. Polar

Polar refers to extremely cold temperatures or conditions. It is often used to describe a frigid environment or weather.

  • For example, “I can’t feel my toes, it’s polar outside!”
  • A person might say, “I need to bundle up, it’s polar in here.”
  • Someone might describe a particularly cold day as, “It feels like a polar vortex hit.”

24. Wintry

Wintry refers to the characteristics of winter, including cold temperatures and snowy conditions.

  • For instance, “I love the wintry landscape with snow-covered trees.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait for the wintry weather to arrive.”
  • Someone might describe a snowy day as, “It’s a wintry wonderland outside.”

25. Cold snap

A cold snap refers to a sudden and significant drop in temperature over a short period of time.

  • For example, “We’re expecting a cold snap tonight, so make sure to bundle up.”
  • A person might say, “The cold snap caught me off guard, I wasn’t prepared for the sudden chill.”
  • Someone might describe a week of unusually cold weather as, “We’re in the midst of a cold snap.”

26. Cool

When used to describe the weather, “cool” means that it is moderately cold. It is often used as a casual term to indicate a comfortable temperature that is not too hot or too cold.

  • For example, someone might say, “The weather is cool today, perfect for a walk.”
  • In a conversation about outdoor activities, one might say, “Let’s go for a bike ride while it’s still cool.”
  • A person might describe a refreshing breeze as, “It feels so cool outside.”

27. Brisk

When describing the weather, “brisk” means that it is cold and invigorating. It suggests a level of activity and movement to combat the cold temperature.

  • For instance, someone might say, “It’s a brisk morning, perfect for a jog.”
  • In a discussion about winter sports, one might say, “I love skiing on a brisk day.”
  • A person might describe a chilly wind as, “The wind is really brisk today.”

28. Siberian

When referring to the weather, “Siberian” means extremely cold. It is often used to emphasize the intensity of the cold temperature.

  • For example, someone might say, “Bundle up, it’s Siberian outside.”
  • In a conversation about winter clothing, one might say, “I need a thick coat to survive the Siberian winters.”
  • A person might describe a freezing room as, “It feels like a Siberian icebox in here.”

29. Glacial

When used to describe the weather, “glacial” means extremely cold and slow-moving, like a glacier. It suggests a cold temperature that feels like it is moving at a slow pace.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The wind is glacial today, it cuts right through you.”
  • In a discussion about winter driving, one might say, “Be careful on the roads, they’re glacial.”
  • A person might describe a bitterly cold room as, “It’s so glacial in here, I can’t feel my fingers.”

30. Sub-zero

When referring to the weather, “sub-zero” means a temperature that is below freezing. It indicates a temperature that is extremely cold and can cause water to freeze.

  • For example, someone might say, “The temperature is sub-zero, make sure to wear layers.”
  • In a conversation about winter activities, one might say, “Let’s go ice skating while it’s sub-zero.”
  • A person might describe a frigid wind as, “The wind chill makes it feel sub-zero.”

31. Teeth-chattering

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is so cold that it causes one’s teeth to chatter. It implies that the cold is intense and uncomfortable.

  • For example, “The wind was so strong that it made the temperature teeth-chattering cold.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go outside without a heavy coat, it’s teeth-chattering out there.”
  • Another might complain, “The office AC is always on full blast, it’s teeth-chattering cold in here.”

32. Parky

This slang term is used to describe a cold temperature. It suggests that the weather is cool enough to require extra layers or protection against the cold.

  • For instance, “I need to wear a jacket, it’s parky outside.”
  • Someone might say, “I love going for a walk in the park when it’s a bit parky.”
  • A person might comment, “The mornings are getting parky, winter is coming.”

33. Brass monkeys

This phrase is used to describe extremely cold weather. It originates from the phrase “it’s cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey,” implying that the cold is so intense that it can freeze metal.

  • For example, “I can’t believe how cold it is outside, it’s brass monkeys.”
  • A person might say, “I’m staying indoors, it’s brass monkeys out there.”
  • Another might comment, “I had to wear three layers to stay warm, it’s brass monkeys weather.”

34. Biting

This slang term describes a cold temperature that feels sharp and intense, as if it is biting into one’s skin. It implies that the cold is uncomfortable and harsh.

  • For instance, “The wind is so strong, it’s biting cold.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t stand being outside for too long, it’s too biting.”
  • A person might comment, “The temperature dropped suddenly and it became biting cold.”

35. Raw

This slang term is used to describe a cold temperature that feels unpleasant and uncomfortable. It suggests that the cold is harsh and unrelenting.

  • For example, “I need to bundle up, it’s raw outside.”
  • A person might say, “I hate this weather, it’s so raw.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t wait for spring, I’m tired of this raw cold.”

36. Bleak

This word is often used to describe cold weather that feels desolate or gloomy. It can also be used to describe a situation or environment that feels hopeless or lacking in warmth.

  • For example, “The bleak winter landscape was covered in snow and ice.”
  • Someone might say, “The forecast for tomorrow is bleak, with temperatures dropping below freezing.”
  • In a discussion about a struggling economy, one might comment, “The job market looks bleak for recent graduates.”

37. Crisp

This word is used to describe cold weather that feels invigorating and refreshing. It can also be used to describe something that is cold and clean, like the air or a fresh apple.

  • For instance, “The crisp autumn air made for a pleasant walk.”
  • Someone might say, “I love the feeling of crisp, cold water on a hot summer day.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, one might comment, “The key to a good salad is using crisp, fresh lettuce.”

38. Hyperborean

This word is used to describe extremely cold weather or temperatures. It is often associated with the Arctic regions and can also be used metaphorically to describe something that is cold, distant, or unfeeling.

  • For example, “The explorers faced hyperborean conditions as they trekked through the frozen tundra.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t handle hyperborean temperatures. I prefer warm climates.”
  • In a discussion about a cold-hearted person, one might comment, “He has a hyperborean demeanor, showing no empathy or warmth.”

39. Snappy

This word is used to describe cold weather that feels brisk and refreshing. It can also be used to describe something that is quick or energetic.

  • For instance, “I love going for a run in the snappy morning air.”
  • Someone might say, “Put on a snappy jacket before you go outside. It’s cold.”
  • In a discussion about a lively dance, one might comment, “The dancers moved with snappy, energetic steps.”

40. Hawkish

This word is used to describe bitterly cold weather or temperatures. It is often associated with strong winds and a biting cold that feels harsh and unforgiving.

  • For example, “The hawkish wind cut through my coat, making me shiver.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t stand hawkish temperatures. I prefer to stay indoors.”
  • In a discussion about extreme weather conditions, one might comment, “The forecast warns of hawkish conditions with wind chills below zero.”

41. Blowy

This term refers to cold weather that is accompanied by strong winds. It describes a situation where the wind is blowing strongly and adds to the coldness of the weather.

  • For example, “It’s really blowy outside, make sure to bundle up!”
  • A person might say, “I hate walking in blowy weather, it feels like the wind is cutting through me.”
  • Another might comment, “The blowy conditions are making it difficult to keep my hat on.”

42. Fresh

This term is used to describe cold weather that feels refreshing or invigorating. It implies a sense of revitalization when exposed to the cold.

  • For instance, “I love taking a walk in the fresh cold air, it wakes me up.”
  • Someone might say, “Jumping into a cold lake in the fresh morning air is so invigorating.”
  • Another might comment, “The fresh cold breeze is a welcome relief from the stuffy indoors.”

43. Sharp

This term describes cold weather that feels very intense or piercing. It implies a sharp or cutting sensation when exposed to the cold.

  • For example, “The sharp cold wind was making my eyes water.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand the sharp coldness, it feels like needles on my skin.”
  • Another might comment, “The sharp cold air took my breath away as soon as I stepped outside.”

44. Hard

This term refers to extremely cold weather that feels harsh or intense. It implies a level of difficulty in enduring the cold temperatures.

  • For instance, “The hard cold was unbearable without proper winter clothing.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe how hard the cold is, it feels like it’s freezing my bones.”
  • Another might comment, “The hard cold weather is causing many people to seek shelter.”

45. Draughty

This term describes cold weather that is accompanied by a lot of drafts or currents of air. It implies a feeling of coldness due to the presence of these drafts.

  • For example, “The old house was so draughty, I had to wear extra layers to stay warm.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t sleep in that room, it’s too draughty and the cold air keeps coming in.”
  • Another might comment, “The draughty conditions are making it difficult to keep the heat inside the building.”

46. Nithering

Nithering is a slang term used to describe extremely cold weather or temperatures. It implies a level of discomfort and often emphasizes the severity of the cold.

  • For example, “I stepped outside and it was nithering. I had to run back inside to grab my jacket.”
  • In a conversation about winter weather, someone might say, “The wind was howling and it was absolutely nithering outside.”
  • A person might use nithering to describe a freezing cold room, saying, “I can’t sleep in here, it’s nithering!”

47. Perishing

Perishing is a slang term used to describe extremely cold weather or temperatures. It emphasizes the discomfort and unpleasantness of the cold, often implying that it feels unbearable or intolerable.

  • For instance, “I forgot my gloves and my hands are perishing in this cold.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to get inside, it’s perishing out here!”
  • In a conversation about winter weather, someone might comment, “The wind is making it feel absolutely perishing today.”

48. Colder than a witch’s tit

This slang phrase is used to describe weather or temperatures that are extremely cold. It is a humorous and exaggerated way to emphasize the intensity of the cold.

  • For example, “I stepped outside and it’s colder than a witch’s tit out here!”
  • In a discussion about winter weather, someone might say, “I can’t believe how cold it is today, it’s colder than a witch’s tit.”
  • A person might use this phrase to complain about the cold, saying, “I can’t stand this weather, it’s colder than a witch’s tit!”

49. Colder than a well digger’s ass

This slang phrase is used to describe weather or temperatures that are extremely cold. It is a humorous and exaggerated way to emphasize the intensity of the cold.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe how cold it is outside, it’s colder than a well digger’s ass!”
  • A person might complain, “I hate winter. It’s always colder than a well digger’s ass.”
  • In a conversation about freezing temperatures, someone might comment, “I don’t want to go outside, it’s colder than a well digger’s ass!”

50. Colder than a polar bear’s toenails

This slang phrase is used to describe weather or temperatures that are extremely cold. It is a humorous and exaggerated way to emphasize the intensity of the cold.

  • For example, “I can’t believe how cold it is outside, it’s colder than a polar bear’s toenails!”
  • A person might say, “Bundle up, it’s colder than a polar bear’s toenails out there.”
  • In a discussion about winter weather, someone might comment, “I’ve never experienced cold like this before, it’s colder than a polar bear’s toenails!”

51. Colder than the hairs on a polar bear

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is exceptionally cold, emphasizing the coldness of the polar bear’s fur. It implies that the temperature is so cold that it is even colder than the hairs on a polar bear.

  • For example, “It’s colder than the hairs on a polar bear out here!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t go outside, it’s colder than the hairs on a polar bear.”
  • Another person might exclaim, “I’ve never felt anything colder than the hairs on a polar bear!”

52. Colder than a snowman’s nose

This expression is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold, comparing it to the coldness of a snowman’s nose. It suggests that the temperature is so cold that it is even colder than a snowman’s frozen nose.

  • For instance, “Bundle up, it’s colder than a snowman’s nose outside!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t feel my fingers, it’s colder than a snowman’s nose.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve never experienced anything colder than a snowman’s nose!”

53. Colder than an Eskimo’s kiss

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold, comparing it to the coldness of an Eskimo’s kiss. It implies that the temperature is so cold that it is even colder than the chilly sensation of an Eskimo’s kiss.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside, it’s colder than an Eskimo’s kiss!”
  • Someone might say, “I need to wear three layers, it’s colder than an Eskimo’s kiss.”
  • Another person might exclaim, “I’ve never felt anything colder than an Eskimo’s kiss!”

54. Colder than a penguin’s butt

This expression is used to describe a temperature that is exceptionally cold, emphasizing the coldness of a penguin’s posterior. It suggests that the temperature is so cold that it is even colder than a penguin’s rear end.

  • For instance, “Don’t forget your hat, it’s colder than a penguin’s butt outside!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t feel my toes, it’s colder than a penguin’s butt.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve never experienced anything colder than a penguin’s butt!”

55. Colder than a banker’s heart

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold, comparing it to the coldness of a banker’s heart. It implies that the temperature is so cold that it is even colder than the icy demeanor of a heartless banker.

  • For example, “Wrap up warm, it’s colder than a banker’s heart outside!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t feel my face, it’s colder than a banker’s heart.”
  • Another person might exclaim, “I’ve never felt anything colder than a banker’s heart!”

56. Colder than a brass toilet seat in the Yukon

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold, often to an exaggerated degree. It implies that the coldness is so intense that it would be uncomfortable or unpleasant.

  • For example, “Wow, it’s colder than a brass toilet seat in the Yukon out here!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t go outside, it’s colder than a brass toilet seat in the Yukon!”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe how cold it is, it’s colder than a brass toilet seat in the Yukon!”

57. Colder than a mother-in-law’s love

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is very cold. It humorously compares the coldness to the lack of affection or warmth typically associated with a mother-in-law.

  • For instance, “I need to bundle up, it’s colder than a mother-in-law’s love outside.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t stand this weather, it’s colder than a mother-in-law’s love!”
  • A person might joke, “I’d rather spend time with my mother-in-law than be out in this cold, it’s colder than her love!”

58. Colder than a bucket of penguin poop

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold, often to an exaggerated degree. It humorously compares the coldness to the temperature of penguin poop, implying that it is extremely cold.

  • For example, “I can’t believe how cold it is, it’s colder than a bucket of penguin poop!”
  • Someone might say, “I’m freezing, it’s colder than a bucket of penguin poop out here!”
  • A person might joke, “I wouldn’t want to touch anything, it’s colder than a bucket of penguin poop!”

59. Colder than Jack Frost’s toes

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is very cold. It humorously compares the coldness to the extremities of Jack Frost, a mythical character associated with winter and cold weather.

  • For instance, “I need to wear extra layers, it’s colder than Jack Frost’s toes!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t feel my fingers, it’s colder than Jack Frost’s toes out here!”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t wait for spring, it’s colder than Jack Frost’s toes in this weather!”

60. Colder than a frog’s butt in a blizzard

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold, often to an exaggerated degree. It humorously compares the coldness to the temperature of a frog’s butt in a blizzard, implying that it is extremely cold.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside, it’s colder than a frog’s butt in a blizzard!”
  • Someone might say, “I’m shivering, it’s colder than a frog’s butt in a blizzard out here!”
  • A person might joke, “I don’t want to leave the house, it’s colder than a frog’s butt in a blizzard!”

61. Colder than a nun’s habit

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is very cold, often to an exaggerated degree. It is a comparison to the coldness of a nun’s habit, which is typically made of thick, heavy material.

  • For example, “I stepped outside and it was colder than a nun’s habit.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t go out in this weather, it’s colder than a nun’s habit.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve never felt anything colder than a nun’s habit in the winter.”

62. Colder than a dog’s nose

This expression is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold. It is a comparison to the coldness of a dog’s nose, which is often wet and cool to the touch.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t believe how cold it was outside, it was colder than a dog’s nose.”
  • A person might say, “I need to bundle up, it’s colder than a dog’s nose out there.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve never felt anything colder than a dog’s nose on a winter morning.”

63. Colder than a stepmother’s kiss

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold. It is a comparison to the coldness of a stepmother’s kiss, which is often portrayed as cold and distant in fairy tales.

  • For example, “I walked outside and it was colder than a stepmother’s kiss.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe how cold it is, it’s colder than a stepmother’s kiss.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve never felt anything colder than a stepmother’s kiss in the winter.”

64. Colder than a mortician’s mistress

This expression is used to describe a temperature that is very cold, often to an exaggerated degree. It is a comparison to the coldness of a mortician’s mistress, which implies a level of coldness and detachment.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t believe how cold it was outside, it was colder than a mortician’s mistress.”
  • A person might say, “I need to stay indoors, it’s colder than a mortician’s mistress out there.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve never felt anything colder than a mortician’s mistress on a winter day.”
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