Top 20 Slang For Commit – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to relationships, friendships, or even plans, the word “commit” plays a significant role in our daily conversations. But, have you ever wondered about the various slang terms used to express commitment in a more casual or trendy way? Look no further as we have compiled a list of the top slang for commit that will not only keep you in the loop but also add some flair to your communication style. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your slang game!

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1. Go all in

This phrase is often used in situations where someone is fully committing to a decision or action without holding back.

  • For example, “I’m going all in on this business venture and investing all my savings.”
  • A poker player might say, “I have a good hand, so I’m going all in.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We need to go all in and give it our best shot in the final game.”

2. Lock in

This phrase is used to express a firm commitment or to confirm and solidify plans.

  • For instance, “I’m locking in my attendance for the event next week.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve locked in my decision and I’m not changing my mind.”
  • In a business context, a contract might be described as “locked in” once both parties have agreed and signed.

3. Throw down

This slang phrase can have different meanings depending on the context. It can mean to make a strong commitment or to challenge someone to a competition or fight.

  • For example, “I’m throwing down and giving it my all in this competition.”
  • In a confrontational situation, someone might say, “If you have a problem, let’s throw down and settle it.”
  • It can also mean to contribute or share, as in “Let’s all throw down some money for the group gift.”

4. Dive in

This phrase is used to describe fully immersing oneself in an activity or situation without hesitation.

  • For instance, “I’m going to dive in and start learning a new language.”
  • A person might say, “I’m diving in headfirst and taking on this new project.”
  • In a conversation about trying new experiences, someone might say, “Life is short, so why not dive in and try something new?”

5. Stick to your guns

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to stay firm and not waver in their beliefs or decisions.

  • For example, “Even if others disagree, you should stick to your guns and stand up for what you believe in.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The candidate needs to stick to their guns and not flip-flop on important issues.”
  • It can also be used in a personal context, such as “I’m sticking to my guns and not compromising on my career goals.”

6. Put your money where your mouth is

This phrase means to prove that you are willing to support or stand behind what you say by taking action. It implies that someone should demonstrate their commitment or belief by investing their resources or taking risks.

  • For example, if someone challenges you to do something, you might respond, “I’ll put my money where my mouth is and show you that I can do it.”
  • In a discussion about a business proposal, someone might say, “If you truly believe in this idea, you should be willing to put your money where your mouth is and invest in it.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “It’s time to put your money where your mouth is and show everyone what you’re capable of.”

7. Step up to the plate

This phrase comes from baseball, where the batter steps up to the home plate to take their turn at bat. It means to take responsibility or take action in a situation, especially when it is challenging or demanding.

  • For instance, if someone asks for volunteers for a difficult task, you might say, “I’ll step up to the plate and take on the challenge.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might encourage their team by saying, “It’s time for everyone to step up to the plate and give their best effort.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “It’s time to step up to the plate and take responsibility for your actions.”

8. Take the plunge

This phrase means to make a bold decision or commit to something, especially when it involves taking a risk or facing uncertainty. It often implies that someone is willing to dive into a new experience or venture without hesitation.

  • For example, if someone is considering starting their own business, they might say, “I’ve decided to take the plunge and pursue my entrepreneurial dreams.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might say, “I finally decided to take the plunge and book that solo trip to Europe.”
  • A person discussing their decision to change careers might say, “After much contemplation, I decided to take the plunge and pursue my passion.”

9. Bite the bullet

This phrase originated from the practice of having soldiers bite on a bullet during surgery to help them endure the pain. It means to face a difficult or unpleasant situation with courage and without hesitation.

  • For instance, if someone is nervous about giving a presentation, they might say, “I just have to bite the bullet and do it.”
  • In a discussion about making tough decisions, someone might say, “Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and make the choice that’s best for you.”
  • A person discussing their decision to confront a difficult conversation might say, “I knew it wouldn’t be easy, but I had to bite the bullet and address the issue.”

10. Jump in with both feet

This phrase means to fully commit to something without hesitation or reservation. It implies that someone is willing to dive into a new experience or venture with enthusiasm and wholeheartedness.

  • For example, if someone is starting a new job, they might say, “I’m ready to jump in with both feet and give it my all.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new hobby, someone might say, “I’ve decided to jump in with both feet and sign up for dance classes.”
  • A person discussing their decision to pursue a new relationship might say, “After taking some time for myself, I’m ready to jump in with both feet and see where it leads.”

11. Lay down the law

This phrase means to assert one’s authority or make clear what is expected. It is often used in a situation where someone is setting strict rules or guidelines.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I had to lay down the law with my teenager and set some boundaries.”
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might say, “I had to lay down the law and enforce the company’s policies.”
  • A teacher might use this phrase when explaining classroom rules, saying, “I’m going to lay down the law so everyone knows what is expected.”

12. Plant your flag

This phrase is used to assert one’s position or claim ownership over something. It signifies taking a strong stance and making a clear statement.

  • For instance, a politician might say, “I’m going to plant my flag and fight for this issue.”
  • In a debate, someone might declare, “I’m planting my flag on the side of justice and equality.”
  • A sports team might use this phrase to express determination, saying, “We’re going to plant our flag and show that we’re the best.”

13. Throw your weight around

This phrase means to assert one’s authority or power in a forceful or aggressive manner. It implies using one’s influence to get what they want.

  • For example, a boss might say, “Don’t throw your weight around and intimidate your coworkers.”
  • In a group project, a dominant team member might try to control the situation by throwing their weight around.
  • A celebrity might use this phrase when discussing their influence, saying, “I don’t like to throw my weight around, but sometimes I have to use my platform to make a difference.”

14. Seal the deal

This phrase means to complete or finalize a deal or agreement. It signifies reaching a point of agreement or making a decision.

  • For instance, a salesperson might say, “I sealed the deal and closed the sale.”
  • In a business negotiation, someone might say, “We need to seal the deal and come to an agreement.”
  • A couple might use this phrase when discussing marriage, saying, “We’re ready to seal the deal and tie the knot.”

15. Cross the Rubicon

This phrase refers to making a decision or taking an action that cannot be undone or reversed. It signifies a significant commitment or irreversible action.

  • For example, a person might say, “Once you cross the Rubicon, there’s no turning back.”
  • In a career change, someone might say, “I finally crossed the Rubicon and quit my job to pursue my passion.”
  • A politician might use this phrase when discussing a controversial policy, saying, “We’re about to cross the Rubicon and make a bold move for change.”

16. Hold fast

To remain steadfast and committed to a goal or course of action. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to persevere and not give up.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Hold fast and don’t let up, we can win this game!”
  • In a motivational speech, a speaker might say, “Hold fast to your dreams and never let go.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I know it’s tough, but hold fast and keep pushing forward.”

17. Stay the course

To persist and not deviate from the chosen path or plan. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to stay committed and not be swayed by distractions or obstacles.

  • For instance, a leader might say, “We have faced challenges before, but we must stay the course and see it through.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, someone might advise, “Even when things get tough, stay the course and don’t give up.”
  • A mentor might remind their mentee, “Success comes to those who stay the course and remain focused.”

18. Stay true

To stay committed and loyal to a person, belief, or cause. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to stay true to their values and principles.

  • For example, in a relationship, a partner might say, “No matter what happens, I will always stay true to you.”
  • In a discussion about integrity, someone might say, “It’s important to stay true to yourself and your beliefs.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I know it’s difficult, but stay true to who you are and what you believe in.”

19. Hold your ground

To maintain one’s position or opinion despite opposition or pressure to change. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to stay committed and not back down.

  • For instance, in a debate, someone might say, “I disagree with you, but I respect your ability to hold your ground.”
  • In a discussion about standing up for oneself, a person might advise, “When faced with adversity, hold your ground and don’t let others push you around.”
  • A mentor might encourage their mentee by saying, “You have a strong argument, hold your ground and defend your position.”

20. Stay committed

To continue to be devoted and loyal to a task, goal, or relationship. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to stay focused and not give up.

  • For example, in a sports team, a coach might say, “Stay committed to your training, and success will follow.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might advise, “To achieve your dreams, you must stay committed and put in the necessary effort.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I know it’s challenging, but stay committed and you will reach your desired outcome.”
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