Top 57 Slang For Going – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the act of heading out or leaving a place, language has evolved to offer a plethora of colorful options. From “peace out” to “catch you later,” there’s a slang term for every occasion. Join us as we unravel the trendy and hip ways people are talking about going in our latest compilation. Stay ahead of the curve and spice up your vocabulary with these fresh expressions!

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1. Bounce

To leave a place or situation abruptly or quickly. “Bounce” indicates a swift departure.

  • For example, “I’m going to bounce from this party. It’s getting boring.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s bounce before the cops show up.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I need to bounce. Talk to you later!”

2. Dip

To leave a place or situation. “Dip” implies a smooth and effortless departure.

  • For instance, “I’m going to dip out of this meeting early.”
  • A person might say, “I need to dip before the traffic gets worse.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might write, “I’m going to dip. Catch you later!”

3. Bail

To leave a place or situation quickly, often to avoid trouble or to get out of an uncomfortable or undesirable situation.

  • For example, “I had to bail on the party when I saw my ex there.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to bail on this date. It’s not going well.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I bailed on the meeting. It was a waste of time.”

4. Peace out

A casual and friendly way to say goodbye or to indicate that you are leaving.

  • For instance, “Alright, I’m gonna peace out. See you later!”
  • A friend might say, “Peace out, y’all! It’s been fun.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might write, “I’m gonna peace out now. Talk to you soon!”

5. GTFO

An aggressive and vulgar way to express the need for someone to leave immediately or to indicate that you are leaving in a hurry.

  • For example, “This party is lame. Let’s GTFO.”
  • A person might say, “If you don’t stop bothering me, I’m going to tell you to GTFO.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m done with this conversation. GTFO!”

6. Skedaddle

This slang term means to leave or go away in a hurry. It is often used to describe a swift and sudden departure from a place or situation.

  • For example, “I saw the police coming, so I skedaddled out of there.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding an awkward situation, someone might say, “I would just skedaddle before things get worse.”
  • Another usage might be, “After finishing work, I skedaddled home to relax.”

7. Split

This slang term means to leave or go, often abruptly or without warning. It can be used in various contexts to indicate a quick departure from a place or situation.

  • For instance, “I’m going to split. See you later!”
  • In a conversation about ending a relationship, someone might say, “I finally decided to split with my toxic partner.”
  • Another usage might be, “The party was boring, so I split and went to a different one.”

8. Jet

This slang term means to leave or depart quickly. It is often used to describe a swift and sudden exit from a place or situation.

  • For example, “I have to jet. I’m running late for my appointment.”
  • In a conversation about catching a flight, someone might say, “We need to jet if we don’t want to miss our plane.”
  • Another usage might be, “After finishing work, I jetted off to meet my friends.”

9. Roll out

This slang term means to leave or depart from a place. It can be used to indicate a casual or relaxed departure, often with a sense of moving on to the next activity or destination.

  • For instance, “I’m going to roll out and grab some lunch.”
  • In a conversation about ending a social gathering, someone might say, “It’s getting late, so I think it’s time to roll out.”
  • Another usage might be, “After the meeting, everyone rolled out and went back to their offices.”

10. Dip out

This slang term means to leave or exit a place or situation. It is often used to indicate a sudden or swift departure, sometimes without saying goodbye or providing an explanation.

  • For example, “I’m going to dip out early. I’m not feeling well.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding a boring event, someone might say, “Let’s dip out before it gets too dull.”
  • Another usage might be, “After the concert, we dipped out and headed to a nearby bar.”

11. Scoot

This slang term means to go or leave a place in a hurry or quickly.

  • For example, “I need to scoot, I have a meeting to attend.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Scoot off to school, you don’t want to be late.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll scoot over to your place after work.”

12. Vamoose

This slang word means to leave or depart quickly, often used to express urgency or the need to go immediately.

  • For instance, “We need to vamoose before the storm hits.”
  • In a playful way, someone might say, “Vamoose, you little rascal!”
  • A person might use this word to describe their exit, “I vamoosed out of there as soon as I heard the news.”

13. Hit the road

This phrase means to begin a journey or leave a place, often used to indicate the act of going on a trip or departing from a location.

  • For example, “It’s time to hit the road and start our vacation.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll hit the road now, see you later!”
  • Someone might use this phrase to express their desire to leave, “I’ve had enough, I’m hitting the road.”

14. Take off

This slang term means to leave or depart quickly, often used to indicate a sudden or hasty departure.

  • For instance, “I’ll take off early today, I have some errands to run.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Let’s take off and grab some lunch.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their sudden exit, “I had to take off when I heard the news.”

15. Make tracks

This phrase means to leave a place quickly or start a journey, often used to indicate the act of departing or going away from a location.

  • For example, “It’s getting late, I should make tracks.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s make tracks before it starts raining.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to express their intention to leave, “I’ve got to make tracks, I have a busy day ahead.”

16. Peace

To leave or depart from a place or situation. “Peace” is a slang term used to indicate that someone is going.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’m tired, I’m gonna peace out now.”
  • In a group setting, someone might announce, “Alright guys, I’m peacing out. See you later!”
  • A person might use “peace” as a verb and say,“peace” as a verb and say, “I need to peace from this party, it’s getting boring.”

17. Get going

To start moving or leave a place. “Get going” is a slang phrase used to indicate that someone is ready to leave or start a journey.

  • For instance, a parent might tell their child, “Come on, it’s time to get going to school.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “We should get going if we want to make it on time.”
  • A person might use “get going” as a command and say,“get going” as a command and say, “Get going, we don’t have all day!”

To leave or depart from a place. “Head out” is a casual phrase used to indicate that someone is leaving.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’m gonna head out, it’s getting late.”
  • In a group setting, someone might announce, “Alright, let’s head out and grab some dinner.”
  • A person might use “head out” as a directive and say,“head out” as a directive and say, “We should head out now if we want to avoid traffic.”

19. Bounce out

To leave or depart from a place hastily. “Bounce out” is a slang term used to indicate that someone is leaving in a hurry.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to bounce out of here before the rain starts.”
  • In a conversation about a boring event, someone might suggest, “Let’s bounce out of this party and find something more fun.”
  • A friend might use “bounce out” as a request and say,“bounce out” as a request and say, “Hey, can you bounce out of here and grab us some snacks?”

20. Cut out

To leave or depart from a place. “Cut out” is a colloquial phrase used to indicate that someone is leaving.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m gonna cut out and get some fresh air.”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might suggest, “Let’s cut out early and catch a movie.”
  • A person might use “cut out” as a command and say,“cut out” as a command and say, “Cut out of here, it’s too crowded.”

21. Book it

This phrase means to leave or go somewhere in a hurry. It implies a sense of urgency or the need to depart swiftly.

  • For example, “We need to finish this project by tomorrow, so let’s book it.”
  • In a movie scene, a character might shout, “The police are coming! Book it!”
  • A person might say, “I saw a spider in my room, and I booked it out of there.”

22. Bug out

To “bug out” means to leave a place abruptly or unexpectedly, often due to a sudden change in circumstances or a desire to avoid trouble.

  • For instance, “When the storm hit, we had to bug out of the camping site.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “If things get too wild, I’ll bug out early.”
  • A person might mention, “I had a bad feeling about that place, so I bug out before anything happened.”

23. Hightail it

This phrase means to leave quickly or urgently, often to escape from a situation or to reach a destination as fast as possible.

  • For example, “We heard sirens and decided to hightail it out of there.”
  • In a story about a missed flight, someone might say, “I had to hightail it to the airport to catch my plane.”
  • A person might mention, “When I saw my ex at the party, I hightailed it to the other side of the room.”

24. Beat it

To “beat it” means to leave a place immediately or without delay. It can be used to express a sense of annoyance or the desire for someone to go away.

  • For instance, “I asked him to stop bothering me, but he wouldn’t listen, so I told him to beat it.”
  • In a situation where someone is not wanted, a person might say, “This is a private event. Beat it!”
  • A parent might tell their child, “It’s getting late, so beat it and go to bed.”

25. Scram

The word “scram” is an informal way of saying “leave” or “go away.” It is often used to express annoyance or to tell someone to go away.

  • For example, “I was trying to study, but my roommate was being loud, so I told them to scram.”
  • In a situation where someone is not welcome, a person might say, “We don’t want any trouble here. Scram!”
  • A person might mention, “When the teacher turned her back, some students would scram out of the classroom.”

26. Get outta here

This phrase is used to express disbelief or surprise and can also mean to leave a place.

  • For example, if someone tells you an unbelievable story, you might respond, “Get outta here! That can’t be true.”
  • When it’s time to leave a party, you can say, “I think it’s getting late, let’s get outta here.”
  • If someone asks for your advice on how to handle a difficult situation, you might suggest, “Just get outta there, it’s not worth it.”

27. Dash

To dash means to leave or go somewhere quickly.

  • For instance, if you’re running late for a meeting, you might say, “I have to dash, sorry!”
  • When you’re at a party and need to leave abruptly, you can say, “I’ll catch you all later, I need to dash.”
  • If someone asks why you’re in a hurry, you can reply, “I have some errands to run, so I need to dash.”

28. Split the scene

This phrase means to leave a place or situation.

  • For example, if you’re at a boring party and want to leave, you can say, “Let’s split the scene, this party is a snooze.”
  • When you’re ready to go home after a long day, you can say, “I’m tired, let’s split the scene.”
  • If someone asks why you’re leaving, you can respond, “I have an early morning tomorrow, so I need to split the scene.”

29. Clear out

To clear out means to leave a place or situation quickly.

  • For instance, if you’re in a crowded room and need some space, you can say, “I’m going to clear out for a bit.”
  • When you want to leave a party early, you can say, “I think I’m going to clear out, I have an early morning.”
  • If someone asks why you’re leaving, you can reply, “I have some things to take care of, so I need to clear out.”

30. Hit the bricks

To hit the bricks means to leave a place or situation.

  • For example, if you’re at a friend’s house and it’s time to go, you can say, “I guess it’s time to hit the bricks.”
  • When you’re ready to leave work for the day, you can say, “It’s been a long day, time to hit the bricks.”
  • If someone asks why you’re leaving, you can respond, “I have some errands to run, so I need to hit the bricks.”

31. Get lost

This phrase is used to tell someone to leave or go away. It can be used politely or as a rude way to dismiss someone.

  • For example, if someone is bothering you, you might say, “Why don’t you just get lost?”
  • In a heated argument, one person might yell, “Get lost, I don’t want to see you anymore!”
  • If someone is lingering and you want them to leave, you can say, “I think it’s time for you to get lost.”

32. Make a move

This phrase can have two meanings. It can mean to take action or make a decision, or it can mean to leave a place or go somewhere else.

  • For instance, if you’re waiting for someone to ask you out on a date, your friend might say, “Why don’t you make a move and ask them yourself?”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “I think it’s time to make a move and go to another party.”
  • If someone is hesitating, you can encourage them by saying, “Come on, make a move already!”

33. Go ghost

This phrase means to suddenly disappear or cut off communication with someone, often without explanation.

  • For example, if someone stops responding to your messages and calls, they might have gone ghost on you.
  • In a relationship, one person might say, “I can’t believe they went ghost on me without any explanation.”
  • If someone is avoiding a social event or gathering, they might say, “I think I’m just going to go ghost and not show up.”

34. Scarper

This slang term means to run away or leave a place quickly, especially to avoid trouble or a difficult situation.

  • For instance, if there’s a fight breaking out, someone might yell, “Scarper, before it gets worse!”
  • In a dangerous situation, someone might say, “Let’s scarper before the police arrive.”
  • If someone wants to leave a boring party, they might suggest, “Let’s scarper and find something more fun to do.”

35. Leg it

This phrase means to run or move quickly, often to escape or get away from someone or something.

  • For example, if you’re late for a meeting, you might say, “I need to leg it if I want to make it on time.”
  • In a chase scene in a movie, a character might yell, “Leg it, they’re right behind us!”
  • If someone is trying to catch a bus, they might shout, “Leg it, we’re going to miss it!”

36. Bounce off

This phrase is used to describe leaving a place or situation abruptly or without warning. It implies a sense of urgency or a desire to remove oneself from a particular situation.

  • For example, “I’ve had enough of this party, I think I’m going to bounce off.”
  • In a conversation about leaving work early, someone might say, “I’m going to bounce off at 3 o’clock.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s bounce off before it starts raining.”

37. Sayonara

Derived from the Japanese language, “sayonara” is a slang term used to say goodbye or farewell. It is often used in a lighthearted or casual manner.

  • For instance, when leaving a gathering, someone might say, “Sayonara, see you all next time!”
  • In a text message, a person might simply write, “Sayonara!” to indicate their departure.
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Sayonara, don’t miss me too much!”

38. Skedaddle out

This phrase is used to describe leaving a place or situation hastily or in a hurry. It implies a sense of urgency or a desire to escape a particular situation.

  • For example, “I heard the cops are coming, let’s skedaddle out of here!”
  • In a conversation about leaving a boring party, someone might say, “I’m ready to skedaddle out of this place.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s skedaddle out before things get awkward.”

39. Cut and run

This phrase is used to describe leaving a situation or place suddenly and without warning. It implies a sense of urgency or a desire to escape a particular situation.

  • For instance, “I can’t handle this argument anymore, I’m going to cut and run.”
  • In a conversation about leaving a difficult job, someone might say, “I think it’s time to cut and run from this place.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s cut and run before things get worse.”

40. Take a hike

This phrase is used to tell someone to leave or go away, often in a dismissive or annoyed manner. It implies a desire for the person to remove themselves from the current situation.

  • For example, “I’ve had enough of your complaining, why don’t you take a hike?”
  • In a conversation about an unwanted guest, someone might say, “I think it’s time for them to take a hike.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “If you keep bothering me, I’m going to tell you to take a hike!”

41. Go AWOL

This phrase is often used in a military context to describe someone who leaves their post or duty without permission. It can also be used more generally to describe someone who disappears or goes missing without explanation.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I can’t handle the stress anymore, I’m going AWOL.”
  • In a conversation about unreliable friends, someone might comment, “He always promises to show up but then goes AWOL.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m going AWOL from work today, I need a mental health day.”

42. Make oneself scarce

This phrase is used to describe someone who intentionally removes themselves from a situation or avoids being seen or found. It implies that the person wants to avoid attention or interaction.

  • For instance, if someone is avoiding a difficult conversation, they might say, “I’m going to make myself scarce for a while.”
  • In a crowded party, a person might comment, “I’m going to make myself scarce and find a quiet corner.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “When the guests arrive, make yourself scarce and play in your room.”

43. Abscond

This word is used to describe someone who leaves a place quickly and secretly, often to escape from a difficult or dangerous situation. It suggests a sense of urgency or the need to avoid detection.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might abscond with stolen money.
  • In a discussion about corrupt politicians, someone might say, “They absconded with millions of dollars from public funds.”
  • A person might comment on a news article about a fugitive, “The suspect managed to abscond from custody.”

44. Decamp

This word is used to describe someone who leaves a place, often a temporary location, suddenly or secretly. It implies a sense of urgency or a desire to avoid detection.

  • For instance, in a camping trip, someone might decide to decamp and move to a different location.
  • In a conversation about a difficult living situation, a person might say, “I can’t stand it anymore, I’m going to decamp and find a new apartment.”
  • A journalist reporting on a protest might say, “The protesters decided to decamp from the park and march through the streets.”

45. Elope

This word is used to describe a couple who runs away together, often without the consent or knowledge of their families, to get married. It implies a sense of romantic spontaneity and a desire to escape societal expectations.

  • For example, a young couple might elope to Las Vegas and get married in a chapel.
  • In a conversation about wedding planning, someone might say, “We’re considering eloping instead of having a big wedding.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post of a couple eloping, “Congratulations on your elopement! Wishing you a lifetime of happiness.”

46. Flee

To quickly leave a place or situation out of fear or to avoid danger.

  • For example, “When the fire alarm went off, everyone began to flee the building.”
  • A person might say, “I saw the spider and immediately fled the room.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “We need to flee before the police arrive.”

47. Run away

To leave a place or situation by running, often to avoid trouble or to escape danger.

  • For instance, “The child got scared and ran away from the stranger.”
  • A person might say, “I saw my ex at the party, so I decided to run away and avoid any confrontation.”
  • In an action movie, a character might say, “We need to run away from the explosion!”

48. Depart

To leave a place or start a journey.

  • For example, “The train is about to depart, so make sure you’re on board.”
  • A person might say, “I need to depart early to catch my flight.”
  • In a farewell message, someone might write, “It’s time for me to depart and start a new chapter in my life.”

49. Exit

To leave or go out of a place.

  • For instance, “Please use the emergency exit in case of a fire.”
  • A person might say, “I need to exit the meeting early to attend another appointment.”
  • In a theater, a sign might say, “Do not enter through the exit door.”

50. Evacuate

To leave a place quickly, usually due to a dangerous or emergency situation.

  • For example, “The city ordered residents to evacuate ahead of the hurricane.”
  • A person might say, “We need to evacuate the building because of a gas leak.”
  • In a disaster movie, a character might shout, “Evacuate the area! The volcano is about to erupt!”

51. Withdraw

To leave a place or situation abruptly or unexpectedly. “Withdraw” is often used informally to describe leaving a gathering or event without saying goodbye.

  • For instance, if someone wants to leave a party early, they might say, “I think I’m going to withdraw and head home.”
  • In a group chat, a person might message, “Sorry guys, I have to withdraw. Something came up.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you planning to withdraw after the movie or stay for a while?”

52. Retreat

To leave or depart from a location or situation. “Retreat” is commonly used to describe leaving a social gathering or event.

  • For example, if someone wants to leave a crowded party, they might say, “I’m going to retreat and find some fresh air.”
  • During a boring meeting, a person might whisper to a coworker, “Let’s retreat and grab some coffee.”
  • A friend might suggest, “The party is getting too wild. Shall we retreat to a quieter place?”

53. Absent oneself

To leave or disappear without notifying anyone. “Absent oneself” is a more formal term for leaving a place or situation without saying goodbye.

  • For instance, if someone wants to leave a meeting early, they might say, “I apologize, but I need to absent myself from the remainder of the meeting.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might quietly pack up and ghost the lecture without the professor noticing.
  • A coworker might comment, “I’ve noticed that John tends to absent himself from team meetings quite often.”

54. Quit

To stop participating in an activity or leave a situation. “Quit” is a straightforward term used to describe the action of abruptly ending one’s involvement.

  • For example, if someone wants to stop playing a game, they might say, “I quit. This game is too frustrating.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult job, a person might say, “I finally decided to quit and find something less stressful.”
  • A friend might express frustration, “She always bails on our plans at the last minute. It’s so annoying.”

55. Say farewell

To bid goodbye or take one’s leave. “Say farewell” is a more formal expression used to describe the act of saying goodbye.

  • For instance, if someone is leaving a gathering, they might say, “It’s time for me to say farewell. Thank you for having me.”
  • In a farewell party, a person might give a speech and say, “I want to say farewell to all my colleagues who have been a part of my journey.”
  • A friend might use a casual expression and say, “I’m out. Peace out, everyone!”

56. Go away

This phrase is used to tell someone to leave or to express the desire to leave a place or situation.

  • For example, if someone is bothering you, you might say, “Go away and leave me alone!”
  • In a friendly context, someone might say, “I have to go away now, but I’ll see you later.”
  • If someone is tired of a party, they might say, “I think it’s time to go away and get some rest.”

57. Clear off

This phrase is similar to “go away” and is used to tell someone to leave or to express the desire to leave a place or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is being annoying, you might say, “Clear off and stop bothering me!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I need to clear off now, but I’ll catch up with you later.”
  • If someone wants to end a phone call, they might say, “I have to clear off and get back to work.”
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