Top 71 Slang For Member – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang for member, the language is constantly evolving and adapting to new trends. Whether you’re a seasoned slang user or just dipping your toes into the world of trendy vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. Our team has put together a list of the hottest and most current slang terms for member that will have you feeling in-the-know and ready to impress your friends. So, buckle up and get ready to expand your lexicon with this fun and informative listicle!

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1. Bro

This term is used to refer to a close friend or male companion, often with a sense of camaraderie or brotherhood. It is commonly used among young men and is a way to show familiarity and solidarity.

2. Homie

This term is derived from “homeboy” and is used to refer to a close friend or someone from the same neighborhood or community. It is commonly used in urban slang and is a way to show a sense of loyalty and connection.

3. Squad member

This term is often used to refer to someone who is part of a close-knit group or crew. It is commonly used among young people and is a way to indicate belonging and unity within a social circle.

4. Comrade

This term is borrowed from socialist and communist terminology and is used to refer to a fellow member of a group or organization. It is often used humorously or ironically, and can convey a sense of solidarity or shared goals.

5. Pal

This term is a casual and friendly way to refer to someone as a friend or companion. It is a versatile term that can be used in various contexts and is often used to indicate a sense of closeness and familiarity.

6. Crewmate

This term refers to a member of a group or team, especially in a professional or organized setting. It is often used to describe someone who works closely with others towards a common goal.

  • For example, in a workplace, a colleague might say, “I couldn’t have finished the project without my crewmates.”
  • In a sports team, a player might shout, “Pass the ball to your crewmate!”
  • A member of a band might introduce their bandmates as their “crewmates.”

7. Buddy

This word is a casual term used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is often used to express camaraderie or familiarity with someone.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Hey buddy, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might ask, “Wanna grab lunch, buddy?”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’ve got your back, buddy.”

8. Amigo

This term is derived from Spanish and is used to refer to a friend or companion. It is often used in a casual or friendly context.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey amigo, long time no see!”
  • In a group of friends, one person might say, “Let’s go, amigos!”
  • A person might introduce their friend to others by saying, “This is my amigo, Juan.”

9. Sidekick

This word refers to a person who accompanies or assists someone, often in a supportive or subordinate role. It is often used to describe a close companion or someone who is always by another person’s side.

  • For instance, a superhero might have a sidekick who helps them fight crime.
  • In a friendship, one person might jokingly say, “You’re my trusty sidekick.”
  • A character in a book might rely on their sidekick for advice and support.

10. Wingman

This term originated from aviation and refers to a person who supports or assists another person, especially in social or romantic situations. It is often used to describe someone who helps another person approach or attract potential romantic partners.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need a wingman for tonight’s party.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might ask, “Can you be my wingman?”
  • A character in a movie might rely on their wingman to help them make a good impression on someone they’re interested in.

11. Mate

A term used to refer to a close friend or companion. “Mate” is commonly used in British English but has also been adopted in other English-speaking countries.

  • For example, “Hey mate, want to grab a pint after work?”
  • A person might say, “He’s not just my coworker, he’s also my mate.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might ask, “Do you have any mates in Australia?”

12. Chum

An informal term for a close friend or buddy. “Chum” is often used to refer to someone with whom you have a close and trusting relationship.

  • For instance, “I’ve known him since we were kids. He’s my chum.”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might say, “I’m going fishing with my chum.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any chums from your college days?”

13. BFF

An acronym used to refer to a person’s closest and most trusted friend. “BFF” is often used to describe a friendship that is expected to last a lifetime.

  • For example, “She’s my BFF. We’ve been friends since kindergarten.”
  • A person might say, “I can always count on my BFF to be there for me.”
  • In a conversation about friendships, someone might ask, “Do you have a BFF?”

14. Partner

A term used to refer to a person’s romantic or life partner. “Partner” can be used to describe both married and unmarried couples.

  • For instance, “I’m going on vacation with my partner.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “I’m looking for a partner who shares my interests.”
  • A person might ask, “How long have you been with your partner?”

15. Associate

A term used to refer to a person with whom one works or is professionally connected. “Associate” is often used in a formal or business context.

  • For example, “He’s my associate at the law firm.”
  • A person might say, “I have many associates in the industry.”
  • In a conversation about networking, someone might ask, “Do you have any professional associates?”

16. Cohort

This term refers to a person who shares a common goal or purpose with others, often used to describe a group or team working together. It implies a sense of camaraderie and mutual support.

  • For example, “We’re all in this together, my cohort and I.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might say, “I trust my cohort with my life.”
  • A person discussing a group project might say, “My cohort and I are putting in a lot of effort to make this successful.”

17. Ally

An ally is someone who supports and stands by you, especially in times of need. It can also refer to someone who shares similar values and works towards a common cause.

  • For instance, “I’m grateful to have such a loyal ally in my life.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “We need to unite with our allies to achieve our goals.”
  • A person discussing LGBTQ+ rights might say, “It’s important to be an ally and stand up for equality.”

18. Acquaintance

An acquaintance is someone you know, but not as well as a friend. It implies a casual or superficial relationship, where you are familiar with each other but may not have a deep connection.

  • For example, “I bumped into an old acquaintance at the grocery store.”
  • When introducing someone, you might say, “This is my acquaintance, John.”
  • A person discussing networking might say, “Acquaintances can be valuable contacts in expanding your professional network.”

19. Crony

A crony is a close friend or companion, often used to describe someone you spend a lot of time with and share a strong bond. It can also have a negative connotation, suggesting a close relationship based on mutual back-scratching or favoritism.

  • For instance, “He’s not just my coworker, he’s my crony.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “He only got the job because he’s the mayor’s crony.”
  • A person talking about a close friendship might say, “She’s been my crony since we were kids.”

20. Colleague

A colleague is someone you work with, often in the same profession or organization. It implies a professional relationship, where you collaborate and support each other in a work setting.

  • For example, “I have a meeting with my colleagues this afternoon.”
  • When introducing someone at work, you might say, “This is my colleague, Sarah.”
  • A person discussing teamwork might say, “Effective communication is key among colleagues to achieve common goals.”

21. Confidant

A confidant is someone who is trusted with personal and confidential information. It refers to a close friend or companion whom one can confide in and trust completely.

  • For example, “I told my confidant about my deepest secrets and fears.”
  • In a conversation about personal problems, someone might say, “I need to talk to my confidant about this.”
  • A person might introduce their confidant by saying, “This is my confidant, we’ve been through everything together.”

22. Playmate

A playmate is someone with whom one engages in playful activities or games. It typically refers to a friend or companion with whom one enjoys spending leisure time.

  • For instance, “I used to have a playmate when I was a child, and we would have so much fun together.”
  • In a discussion about childhood memories, someone might say, “I had a group of playmates who lived in my neighborhood.”
  • A person might invite their friend to join in a game by saying, “Hey, do you want to be my playmate for this board game?”

23. Roomie

A roomie is a casual term for a person with whom one shares a living space, typically a bedroom or apartment. It is often used in a friendly or informal context.

  • For example, “I’m looking for a new roomie to split the rent with.”
  • In a conversation about living arrangements, someone might say, “I’ve had several roomies over the years, and it’s been a mixed experience.”
  • A person might introduce their roommate by saying, “This is my roomie, we’ve been living together for a year now.”

24. Neighbor

A neighbor is someone who lives in close proximity, usually in the same building or nearby area. It refers to a person who is geographically close and can be a friendly acquaintance or friend.

  • For instance, “I borrowed some sugar from my neighbor when I ran out.”
  • In a discussion about community, someone might say, “I’m lucky to have friendly neighbors who look out for each other.”
  • A person might invite their neighbor for a barbecue by saying, “Hey, we’re having a cookout this weekend. Would you like to join us, neighbor?”

25. Compadre

Compadre is a term of endearment used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is often associated with camaraderie and mutual support.

  • For example, “I’ve known my compadre since we were kids, and we’ve always had each other’s backs.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “You can always count on your compadre to be there for you.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my compadre, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

26. Familiar

This slang term refers to someone who is close or familiar to you. It can be used to describe a friend or acquaintance that you have a good relationship with.

  • For example, “Hey, that’s my familiar from college!”
  • You might introduce someone by saying, “This is my familiar, we go way back.”
  • In a conversation, you might say, “I’m meeting up with my familiars later, wanna join?”

27. Bestie

This slang term is a shortened version of “best friend” and is used to refer to someone who is your closest and most trusted friend.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my bestie tonight.”
  • You might say, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my bestie.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might ask, “Who’s your bestie?”

28. Playa

This slang term can have different meanings depending on the context. It can refer to someone who is skilled at attracting and dating multiple romantic partners, often with a negative connotation.

  • For example, “He’s a real playa, always flirting with different girls.”
  • In a discussion about dating, someone might say, “I don’t want to date a playa, I want someone who’s serious.”
  • Another usage might be, “Don’t trust him, he’s a known playa.”

29. Rider

This slang term is used to describe someone who is always there for you and supports you no matter what. It implies loyalty and reliability.

  • For instance, “She’s my rider, she always has my back.”
  • You might say, “I know I can count on him, he’s a true rider.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might ask, “Who’s your rider?”

30. Homeboy

This slang term is used to refer to a close friend who is from the same neighborhood or shares a similar background. It implies a strong bond and familiarity.

  • For example, “He’s my homeboy, we grew up together.”
  • You might introduce someone by saying, “This is my homeboy, we’ve known each other since childhood.”
  • In a conversation, you might say, “I’m meeting up with my homeboys later, wanna join?”

31. Bae

This term is used to refer to a significant other or someone who is considered the most important person in someone’s life. It is often used as a term of endearment.

  • For example, “I’m going out on a date with my bae tonight.”
  • A person might post a picture with their partner and caption it, “Me and bae enjoying a beach day.”
  • Friends might tease someone by saying, “Hey, where’s your bae? Did you two break up?”

32. Ride or die

This phrase refers to someone who is incredibly loyal and committed, especially in a romantic relationship or friendship. The term implies that this person will stick by your side no matter what, through thick and thin.

  • For example, a person might say, “My best friend is my ride or die. We’ve been through everything together.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might comment, “I’m looking for a partner who is ride or die.”
  • A person might describe their significant other as, “My ride or die, always there to support me.”

33. Main squeeze

This term refers to someone who is your main romantic partner or significant other. They hold a special place in your life and are the most important person to you in terms of romantic relationships.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going out with my main squeeze tonight.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might ask, “Who’s your main squeeze right now?”
  • A person might introduce their partner by saying, “This is my main squeeze, we’ve been together for years.”

34. Wingwoman

A wingwoman is a female friend who helps and supports you in social situations, particularly when it comes to meeting new people or potential romantic partners. They provide assistance and act as a companion or ally.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out with my wingwoman tonight, she’s great at introducing me to new people.”
  • In a discussion about dating, someone might ask, “Do you have a wingwoman to help you meet people?”
  • A person might describe their friend as, “She’s my wingwoman, always there to boost my confidence.”

35. Fam

Short for “family,” this term is used to refer to a group of people who are very close, whether they are actual relatives or not. It implies a sense of loyalty, support, and camaraderie.

  • For instance, a person might say, “These are my fam, we’ve known each other since childhood.”
  • In a conversation about friendships, someone might ask, “Who’s in your fam?”
  • A person might describe their close group of friends as, “My fam, always there for me no matter what.”

36. Pals

This term refers to close friends or companions. It is a casual and friendly way to refer to the people you enjoy spending time with and have a strong bond with.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out for drinks with my pals.”
  • In a discussion about friendships, someone might ask, “Who are your closest pals?”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “These are my pals, we’ve been through a lot together.”

37. Homie G

This term is commonly used in urban communities to refer to a close friend or companion. The “G” at the end is short for “gangster” or “gangsta” and adds a sense of familiarity or camaraderie.

  • For example, “Hey, what’s up homie G? Wanna hang out later?”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “My homie G always has my back.”
  • A person might refer to their group of friends as their “homie Gs.”
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38. Crew

Refers to a close-knit group of friends or associates who share common interests or goals. It can also be used to describe a team or group of people working together towards a specific purpose.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my crew tonight. Wanna join?”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “Our crew worked together to finish the project on time.”
  • A person might say, “I trust my crew with anything. They’re like family to me.”

39. Pard

Derived from the word “partner,” this term is used to refer to someone with whom you have a close relationship or friendship. It is often used in a casual or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “What’s up, pard? Long time no see!”
  • In a conversation about trust, someone might say, “I can always count on my pard to have my back.”
  • A person might refer to their best friend as their “pard.”

40. Compatriot

This term is used to refer to someone who shares the same nationality or country of origin as oneself. It can also be used more broadly to describe a comrade or ally.

  • For instance, “As compatriots, we should support each other in times of need.”
  • In a discussion about patriotism, someone might say, “I’m proud to stand alongside my compatriots.”
  • A person might refer to their fellow citizens as their “compatriots.”

41. Sista

This term is used to refer to a female friend or someone who is like a sister to you. It can also be used as a term of endearment or camaraderie among women.

  • For example, “Hey sista, wanna grab some lunch?”
  • In a conversation about support, someone might say, “My sista is always there for me when I need her.”
  • A person might refer to their close female friends as their “sistas.”
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42. Homegirl

This term is used to refer to a female friend or companion. It is commonly used in informal settings to show camaraderie or familiarity.

  • For example, “Hey homegirl, let’s grab lunch together.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my homegirl, we’ve known each other since high school.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I can always count on my homegirl for support.”

43. Bromeo

This slang term is a combination of “bro” and “Romeo” and is used to refer to a close male friend. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “What’s up, bromeo? Let’s hang out this weekend.”
  • In a group setting, a person might say, “These are my bromeos, we’ve been friends since college.”
  • A person might express gratitude to their friend by saying, “Thanks for always having my back, bromeo.”

44. Bromance

This term describes a close, non-sexual friendship between two men. It is often used to emphasize the strong bond and emotional connection between them.

  • For example, someone might say, “John and Mark have such a bromance, they do everything together.”
  • In a conversation about friendships, a person might say, “I value my bromance with my best friend, we’ve been through thick and thin.”
  • A person might jokingly refer to their friend as their “bromantic partner” to highlight their close relationship.

45. Sisqo

This term is a slang variation of “sis” and is used to refer to a female friend or sister-like figure. It is often used in informal settings to show familiarity or affection.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hey sisqo, let’s go shopping together.”
  • In a conversation, a person might say, “I trust my sisqo with all my secrets.”
  • A person might express gratitude to their friend by saying, “Thanks for always being there for me, sisqo.”

46. Amiga

This term is the Spanish word for “friend” and is commonly used in English to refer to a female friend. It is often used to show camaraderie or familiarity.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hola amiga, ¿cómo estás?” (Hello friend, how are you?)
  • In a conversation about friendships, a person might say, “I have a group of amigas who support me no matter what.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my amiga, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

47. Confidante

A confidante is someone who you trust with your secrets and personal matters. It is often used to refer to a person who provides emotional support and advice.

  • For example, “I can always count on my best friend to be my confidante.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, one might say, “It’s important to have a confidante you can talk to about your feelings.”
  • A person might introduce their confidante by saying, “This is my confidante, we’ve been friends for years.”

48. Blood

The term “blood” is often used to refer to someone who is considered like family, whether they are a close friend or an actual family member.

  • For instance, “He’s not just my friend, he’s my blood.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, one might say, “I would do anything for my blood.”
  • A person might introduce their close friend by saying, “This is my blood, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

49. Broheim

Broheim is a term used to refer to a close male friend. It is a combination of “bro” and “heim,” which means home in German.

  • For example, “Hey broheim, want to grab a drink tonight?”
  • In a discussion about friendship, one might say, “I’ve known my broheim since we were kids.”
  • A person might introduce their close male friend by saying, “This is my broheim, we’ve been friends for years.”

50. Sister from another mister

The term “sister from another mister” is used to refer to a close female friend who is like a sister, even though they are not biologically related.

  • For instance, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my sister from another mister.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, one might say, “I’m so lucky to have a sister from another mister like her.”
  • A person might introduce their close female friend by saying, “This is my sister from another mister, we’ve been best friends since college.”

51. Broette

Broette is a term used to refer to a female friend. It is a play on the word “bro,” which is often used to refer to a male friend.

  • For example, “Hey broette, want to come over and watch a movie?”
  • In a discussion about friendship, one might say, “I consider her one of my closest broettes.”
  • A person might introduce their female friend by saying, “This is my broette, we’ve been friends since high school.”

52. Homedog

This term is used to refer to a person who is like a family member or a very close friend. It signifies a deep bond and loyalty.

  • For example, “I’ve known him since we were kids. He’s my homedog.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “You can always count on your homedogs to have your back.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my homedog, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

53. Ride or die chick

This term is used to describe a woman who is extremely loyal and committed to her partner or friends. She is willing to stick by their side no matter what.

  • For instance, “She’s a ride or die chick, she’ll always have your back.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “I want a ride or die chick who will support me through thick and thin.”
  • A person might describe their best friend as a ride or die chick, saying, “She’s always there for me, no matter what.”

54. Ride or die dude

This term is used to describe a man who is extremely loyal and committed to his partner or friends. He is willing to stick by their side through thick and thin.

  • For example, “He’s a ride or die dude, he’ll always have your back.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “You can count on your ride or die dudes to support you.”
  • A person might introduce their best friend by saying, “This is my ride or die dude, we’ve been through it all together.”

55. Main man

This term is used to refer to a person’s closest male friend. It signifies a strong bond and a deep level of trust.

  • For instance, “He’s my main man, we’ve been friends since childhood.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “Your main man is always there for you.”
  • A person might introduce their best friend by saying, “This is my main man, we’ve been through everything together.”

56. Main woman

This term is used to refer to a person’s closest female friend. It signifies a strong bond and a deep level of trust.

  • For example, “She’s my main woman, we’ve been through it all.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “Your main woman will always have your back.”
  • A person might introduce their best friend by saying, “This is my main woman, we’ve been friends for years.”

57. BFFL

This term is used to refer to a close friend or group of friends who are extremely loyal and supportive of each other. BFFL is an acronym for “Best Friends For Life”.

  • For example, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my BFFL.”
  • A group of friends might refer to themselves as “The BFFLs”.
  • Someone might say, “I know I can always count on my BFFL to be there for me.”

58. Squad

This term is used to refer to a close-knit group of friends or teammates who hang out and support each other. It is often used to describe a group of people who have a strong bond and spend a lot of time together.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my squad tonight.”
  • A person might say, “My squad always has my back.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “Squad, we need to make plans for this weekend!”

59. Posse

This term is used to refer to a group of friends or allies who are loyal and have each other’s backs. It is often associated with a group of people who stick together and support each other in various situations.

  • For example, “He rolled into town with his posse by his side.”
  • A person might say, “I’m meeting up with my posse later.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “We’re forming a posse to track down the outlaws.”

60. Home skillet

This term is used to refer to a close friend or someone who is like family. It is a playful and affectionate way to address someone you have a strong bond with.

  • For instance, “Hey, home skillet, what are you up to?”
  • Friends might greet each other by saying, “What’s up, home skillet?”
  • Someone might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my home skillet, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

61. Pardner

This term is used to refer to a partner or friend, often in a casual or informal context. It is a slang term derived from the word “partner” and is commonly used in Western or cowboy settings.

  • For example, “Howdy, pardner! Ready to ride?”
  • Two friends might address each other as “pardner” when making plans.
  • In a Western movie, a cowboy might say, “Thanks for watchin’ my back, pardner.”

62. Ace

This term is often used to refer to a person who is a loyal and trusted friend. It can also be used to describe someone who is skilled or excellent at something.

  • For example, “He’s my ace, we’ve been friends since childhood.”
  • A person might say, “She’s an ace at playing the guitar, she can play any song.”
  • Another might say, “I can always count on him, he’s my ace in the hole.”

63. Gal pal

This term is used to refer to a female friend or companion. It is often used in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my gal pal tonight.”
  • A person might say, “She’s not just my coworker, she’s also my gal pal.”
  • Another might say, “I love spending time with my gal pals, we always have a great time.”

64. Sista from another mista

This phrase is a play on words, combining “sister” and “mister” to indicate a close friendship between two females who are not biologically related.

  • For example, “She’s my sista from another mista, we’ve been friends since college.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my sista from another mista, we’ve known each other for years.”
  • Another might say, “She’s not just a friend, she’s like a sister to me. We’re sistas from another mista.”

65. Bestie for the restie

This term is used to describe a best friend who is incredibly close and important to someone. It emphasizes the strong bond and loyalty between the two individuals.

  • For instance, “She’s not just my bestie, she’s my bestie for the restie.”
  • A person might say, “We’ve been through everything together, she’s my bestie for the restie.”
  • Another might say, “I can always count on her, she’s my bestie for the restie.”

66. Main chick

This term is used to describe a person’s primary romantic partner or girlfriend. It implies that there may be other romantic partners, but the “main chick” holds a special place of importance.

  • For example, “She’s not just a fling, she’s my main chick.”
  • A person might introduce their partner by saying, “This is my main chick, we’ve been together for years.”
  • Another might say, “I’m lucky to have her as my main chick, she’s the best.”

67. Ride or die pal

This term refers to a close friend who will stick by your side no matter what. It implies unwavering loyalty and support.

  • For example, “He’s my ride or die pal. We’ve been through thick and thin together.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “A true ride or die pal is hard to find.”
  • A person might describe their best friend as, “She’s not just a friend, she’s my ride or die pal.”

68. Ride or die amigo

Similar to “ride or die pal,” this term translates to “ride or die friend” in Spanish. It carries the same meaning of a loyal and supportive friend.

  • For instance, “Mi amigo es mi ride or die. Siempre está allí para mí.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “Un verdadero amigo ride or die es difícil de encontrar.”
  • A person might introduce their best friend by saying, “Ella no es solo una amiga, es mi ride or die amigo.”

69. Ride or die comrade

This term translates to “ride or die friend” in Russian. It refers to a loyal and dedicated friend who will always be there for you.

  • For example, “Мой товарищ ride or die. Он всегда рядом со мной.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “Настоящий товарищ ride or die найти сложно.”
  • A person might describe their best friend as, “Она не просто друг, она мой ride or die товарищ.”

70. Ride or die mate

Similar to “ride or die pal,” this term is commonly used in Australian slang to refer to a loyal and trustworthy friend.

  • For instance, “He’s my ride or die mate. We’ve been mates since childhood.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “A true ride or die mate is someone you can always count on.”
  • A person might introduce their best friend by saying, “She’s not just a mate, she’s my ride or die mate.”

71. Ride or die chum

This term is often used in British slang to describe a loyal and steadfast friend who will always have your back.

  • For example, “He’s my ride or die chum. We’ve been mates for years.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “A true ride or die chum is someone you can trust with anything.”
  • A person might describe their best friend as, “He’s not just a chum, he’s my ride or die chum.”