Top 35 Slang For Novel – Meaning & Usage

Novels hold a special place in our hearts, transporting us to different worlds and captivating us with their stories. But have you ever wondered about the slang terms used to describe these literary gems? Look no further as we’ve put together a list that will not only expand your vocabulary but also give you a peek into the language of book lovers. Get ready to dive into the world of novels like never before!

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1. Bookie

This term refers to someone who is passionate about reading books. It is often used to describe someone who reads books frequently or has a large collection of books.

  • For example, “She’s such a bookie, she reads at least two books a week.”
  • In a conversation about favorite authors, someone might say, “I’m a huge bookie for Stephen King.”
  • A book club member might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m a bookie and I love discussing literature with fellow book lovers.”

2. Page-turner

This term describes a book that is so captivating and thrilling that the reader cannot put it down. It implies that the book has a compelling plot and keeps the reader eagerly turning the pages.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t stop reading that book, it was a real page-turner.”
  • In a book review, someone might say, “This mystery novel is a definite page-turner, full of unexpected twists and turns.”
  • A friend might recommend a page-turner by saying, “You have to read this book, it’s a real page-turner from start to finish.”

3. Tome

This term refers to a book that is particularly thick or heavy. It is often used to describe books that are long or comprehensive in content.

  • For example, “I’m reading this tome about ancient civilizations, and it’s over 1000 pages long.”
  • In a discussion about classic literature, someone might mention, “War and Peace is a tome that requires dedication to finish.”
  • A book collector might proudly display their collection of tomes and say, “I love collecting these massive tomes, they make a statement on my bookshelf.”

4. Storybook

This term is used to describe a book that contains fictional stories or tales. It often implies that the book is filled with imaginative and fantastical elements.

  • For instance, “I used to love reading storybooks as a child, especially those with fairy tales.”
  • In a conversation about favorite genres, someone might say, “I’m a big fan of fantasy storybooks.”
  • A teacher might read a storybook to their students and say, “Let’s dive into this storybook and explore a world of imagination together.”

5. Fiction

This term refers to books that are not based on real events or people. It encompasses a wide range of genres, including fantasy, science fiction, romance, and mystery.

  • For example, “I enjoy reading both non-fiction and fiction books, but fiction allows me to escape into different worlds.”
  • In a book club discussion, someone might recommend a fiction book by saying, “This historical fiction novel brings the past to life with captivating storytelling.”
  • A bookstore employee might direct a customer to the fiction section, saying, “If you’re looking for a good story, our fiction section has a wide selection to choose from.”

6. Romance

A genre of novel that focuses on the romantic relationships between characters. Romance novels often involve passionate love, emotional intensity, and a happy ending for the main characters.

  • For example, “I enjoy reading romance novels because they always leave me feeling warm and fuzzy inside.”
  • A reader might say, “The romance in this novel was so well-developed and believable.”
  • Someone recommending a book might say, “If you’re in the mood for a light-hearted romance, I recommend this novel.”

7. Sci-fi

A genre of novel that explores imaginative and futuristic concepts, often based on scientific principles or advancements. Sci-fi novels often include elements such as advanced technology, space exploration, time travel, and speculative societies.

  • For instance, “I love reading sci-fi novels because they transport me to different worlds and challenge my imagination.”
  • A reader might say, “The sci-fi elements in this novel were so well-researched and thought-provoking.”
  • Someone recommending a book might say, “If you’re a fan of futuristic worlds and scientific possibilities, you’ll enjoy this sci-fi novel.”

8. Fantasy

A genre of novel that features elements of magic, mythical creatures, and supernatural phenomena. Fantasy novels often take place in fictional worlds and involve epic quests, battles between good and evil, and the exploration of fantastical realms.

  • For example, “I escape into fantasy novels to experience magical adventures and immerse myself in enchanting worlds.”
  • A reader might say, “The world-building in this fantasy novel was incredibly detailed and immersive.”
  • Someone recommending a book might say, “If you’re looking for a thrilling journey through a land of magic and myth, this fantasy novel is a must-read.”

9. Classic

A novel that is considered to be of enduring literary value and has stood the test of time. Classic novels often explore universal themes, offer social commentary, and showcase exceptional writing and storytelling.

  • For instance, “I love delving into classic novels to experience the rich history of literature and gain insights into the human condition.”
  • A reader might say, “The prose in this classic novel was beautifully crafted and still relevant today.”
  • Someone recommending a book might say, “If you’re looking to expand your literary horizons, I highly recommend diving into this classic novel.”

10. Literary

A term used to describe novels that are considered to be of high artistic quality and literary merit. Literary novels often focus on the depth of character development, complex themes, and sophisticated writing style.

  • For example, “I enjoy reading literary novels because they challenge me intellectually and offer a unique perspective on life.”
  • A reader might say, “The literary elements in this novel were masterfully woven together and left a lasting impact.”
  • Someone recommending a book might say, “If you’re looking for a thought-provoking and beautifully written novel, this literary masterpiece is a must-read.”

11. Novellette

A novellette is a short novel or a work of fiction that is shorter than a novella but longer than a short story. It typically focuses on a single storyline or theme and is often characterized by its concise and compact nature.

  • For example, “She published her first novellette when she was just 16 years old.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “Novellettes offer a quick and satisfying read for those short on time.”
  • A reader might recommend, “If you’re looking for a quick escape, try a novellette.”

12. Novella

A novella is a work of fiction that is longer than a short story but shorter than a full-length novel. It typically has a more focused storyline and fewer subplots than a novel, allowing for a more concentrated and impactful reading experience.

  • For instance, “The author’s latest release is a thought-provoking novella that explores the complexities of human relationships.”
  • In a book club, someone might suggest, “Let’s read a novella this month to mix things up.”
  • A reader might comment, “I love novellas because they allow me to fully immerse myself in a story without committing to a lengthy read.”

13. Fictional work

A fictional work refers to any piece of literature that is not based on real events or people. It encompasses various forms of storytelling, including novels, novellas, short stories, and more. Fictional works transport readers into imaginative worlds and explore themes, characters, and narratives that are created by the author.

  • For example, “The author’s collection of fictional works spans multiple genres, from romance to science fiction.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “Fictional works offer a form of escapism and allow readers to explore different perspectives.”
  • A book lover might recommend, “If you enjoy fictional works, check out this author’s latest release.”

14. Yarn

In slang, a yarn refers to a story or a tale, often with a sense of exaggeration or embellishment. It can be used to describe both fictional and non-fictional narratives, and is often associated with informal storytelling or sharing anecdotes.

  • For instance, “He spun a wild yarn about his adventures during his trip to the Amazon.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Let me tell you a yarn about the time I met a famous celebrity.”
  • A storyteller might begin their narrative by saying, “Gather ’round, folks, and listen to this yarn I have for you.”

15. Narrative

A narrative refers to a sequence of events, experiences, or incidents that are connected and told in a coherent and meaningful way. It encompasses both fictional and non-fictional stories, and can be found in various forms of literature, including novels, short stories, and memoirs.

  • For example, “The author’s narrative explores themes of identity and self-discovery.”
  • In a discussion about storytelling, someone might say, “A compelling narrative can captivate readers and keep them engaged.”
  • A reader might comment, “I enjoy narratives that offer multiple perspectives and interweave different storylines.”

16. Plot

The sequence of events that make up the main narrative of a novel. The plot typically includes an introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.

  • For example, “The plot of the novel revolves around a detective solving a murder mystery.”
  • A reader might comment, “I love how the plot twists and turns, keeping me on the edge of my seat.”
  • In a book review, one might say, “The plot was predictable, but the characters made up for it.”

17. Whopper

A novel or story that is exceptionally long, complex, or dramatic. “Whopper” is a slang term used to describe a novel with an extensive and captivating storyline.

  • For instance, “I just finished reading a whopper of a novel that took me weeks to get through.”
  • A reader might recommend, “If you’re looking for a whopper of a book, check out this fantasy series.”
  • In a discussion about classic literature, someone might mention, “War and Peace is considered a literary whopper.”

18. Saga

A long and involved story that spans multiple generations or has a wide scope. “Saga” is often used to describe a novel that encompasses a grand narrative with numerous characters and events.

  • For example, “The author has created a saga that follows a family through several centuries.”
  • A reader might say, “I’m hooked on this saga series. I can’t wait to see what happens next.”
  • In a book club discussion, someone might ask, “What are your favorite saga novels?”

19. Opus

A novel or work of art that is considered the pinnacle of an artist’s career or a significant achievement in a particular genre. “Opus” is often used to describe a novel that is highly regarded and influential.

  • For instance, “The author’s latest opus has received critical acclaim and numerous awards.”
  • A reader might comment, “I consider this novel to be the author’s opus, showcasing their talent and skill.”
  • In a literary analysis, one might say, “This opus explores complex themes and pushes the boundaries of the genre.”

20. Literary work

A term used to encompass any written composition, including novels, short stories, poems, and plays. “Literary work” is a broad term that refers to any piece of literature.

  • For example, “The author has published several literary works, including novels and poetry collections.”
  • A reader might recommend, “If you’re interested in literary works, check out this classic novel.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might ask, “What are your favorite literary works?”

21. Memoir

A memoir is a type of book where the author tells the story of their own life, often focusing on specific experiences or periods of time. It is a form of autobiography that typically emphasizes personal reflection and introspection.

  • For example, “In her memoir, the author recounts her journey of self-discovery.”
  • A reader might recommend a memoir by saying, “If you enjoy personal stories, you should check out this memoir.”
  • In a bookstore, you might find a section labeled “Memoirs” where these types of books are grouped together.
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22. Graphic novel

A graphic novel is a book that tells a story through a combination of text and illustrations. It is similar to a comic book, but typically has a longer and more complex narrative.

  • For instance, “This graphic novel explores themes of love and loss through stunning artwork.”
  • A fan of graphic novels might say, “I love how the illustrations bring the story to life in a graphic novel.”
  • In a discussion about different types of books, someone might mention, “Graphic novels are a unique form of storytelling that blend words and images.”

23. Epic

An epic is a long narrative poem or story that typically involves heroic deeds, larger-than-life characters, and grand adventures. It often explores themes of heroism, fate, and the struggle between good and evil.

  • For example, “The Odyssey is an epic that follows the journey of Odysseus.”
  • A fan of epic novels might say, “I love getting lost in the epic worlds created by fantasy authors.”
  • In a literature class, the teacher might explain, “Epics were an important form of storytelling in ancient civilizations.”

24. YA

YA stands for Young Adult and refers to a genre of books that are written for and marketed towards teenagers and young adults. These books often feature protagonists who are in their teenage years and explore themes of coming-of-age and identity.

  • For instance, “The Hunger Games is a popular YA dystopian novel.”
  • A fan of YA books might say, “I enjoy reading YA because the stories are relatable and the characters are my age.”
  • In a bookstore, you might find a section labeled “YA Fiction” where these types of books are displayed.
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25. Dystopian

Dystopian refers to a genre of books that depict a fictional society or world that is characterized by oppressive social control, extreme poverty, and often a post-apocalyptic setting. These books often explore themes of government control, rebellion, and the human condition in a bleak future.

  • For example, “1984 by George Orwell is a classic dystopian novel.”
  • A fan of dystopian fiction might say, “I’m fascinated by the different ways authors imagine dystopian societies.”
  • In a discussion about popular book series, someone might mention, “The Hunger Games trilogy is set in a dystopian world.”

26. Adventure

A genre of fiction that focuses on exciting, fast-paced stories filled with action, danger, and suspense. Adventure novels often involve heroic characters who embark on daring quests or explore uncharted territories.

  • For example, “The Lost City” is an adventure novel about a group of explorers searching for a hidden civilization in the Amazon rainforest.
  • A reader might say, “I love adventure novels because they transport me to thrilling and exotic locations.”
  • In a discussion about favorite books, someone might recommend, “If you’re looking for an exciting read, check out ‘Treasure Island’ – it’s a classic adventure novel.”

27. Historical fiction

A genre of literature that combines fictional characters and events with real historical settings and facts. Historical fiction novels allow readers to experience the past through the eyes of fictional characters, providing a unique blend of education and entertainment.

  • For instance, “The Book Thief” is a historical fiction novel set during World War II, exploring the life of a young girl living in Nazi Germany.
  • A reader might say, “I enjoy historical fiction because it brings history to life and helps me better understand different time periods.”
  • In a book club discussion, someone might recommend, “If you’re interested in the Tudor era, you should read ‘Wolf Hall’ – it’s a fantastic historical fiction novel.”

28. Mystery

A genre of fiction that revolves around solving a crime or unraveling a complex puzzle. Mystery novels often feature a detective or amateur sleuth who uses logic, deduction, and investigation to uncover the truth.

  • For example, “Gone Girl” is a mystery novel that follows the disappearance of a woman and the investigation into her husband’s involvement.
  • A reader might say, “I love trying to solve the mystery alongside the characters – it keeps me engaged and guessing until the end.”
  • In a discussion about favorite authors, someone might recommend, “Agatha Christie is the queen of mystery – her novels are always full of twists and turns.”

29. Book

A generic term used to refer to a written or printed work consisting of pages bound together. In the context of slang for novels, “book” is a commonly used term to describe any fictional or non-fictional narrative work.

  • For instance, “To Kill a Mockingbird” is a classic book that explores themes of racism and justice in the American South.
  • A reader might say, “I always have a book with me – it’s my favorite way to escape reality and dive into different worlds.”
  • In a discussion about reading habits, someone might ask, “What’s the last book you read and would you recommend it?”

30. Story

A term used to describe a sequence of events or experiences that are recounted or fictionalized. In the context of slang for novels, “story” is a broad term that encompasses any fictional narrative, regardless of length or genre.

  • For example, “The Great Gatsby” is a story set in the Roaring Twenties, exploring themes of wealth, love, and the American Dream.
  • A reader might say, “I enjoy stories that transport me to different eras or introduce me to unique characters.”
  • In a discussion about favorite genres, someone might say, “I’m a fan of fantasy stories – they allow me to escape into magical worlds.”

31. Read

This term refers to the act of consuming written material, such as books, articles, or online content.

  • For example, “I love to read mystery novels in my spare time.”
  • A book club member might say, “I read the latest bestseller and couldn’t put it down.”
  • A student might complain, “I have so much homework, I don’t have time to read for pleasure.”

32. Non-fiction

Non-fiction refers to written material that is based on real events, facts, or information. It includes genres such as biographies, history books, and essays.

  • For instance, “I prefer reading non-fiction because I enjoy learning about real people and events.”
  • A student might say, “I have to read a non-fiction book for my history class.”
  • A reader might recommend, “If you’re interested in politics, you should check out this non-fiction book.”

33. Novel

A novel is a long work of fiction that tells a story and typically includes characters, plot, and setting. It is a popular format for storytelling and can encompass various genres.

  • For example, “I just finished reading a thrilling mystery novel.”
  • A book club member might say, “We’re discussing a classic novel at our next meeting.”
  • A reader might recommend, “If you’re looking for a good novel to read, try this one.”

34. Young adult

Young adult (YA) refers to a genre of literature that is targeted towards teenagers and young adults. These books often feature teenage protagonists and explore themes relevant to young readers.

  • For instance, “I enjoy reading young adult novels because I can relate to the characters.”
  • A librarian might say, “Our young adult section has a wide selection of books for teenagers.”
  • A reader might recommend, “If you’re a fan of fantasy, you should check out this young adult series.”

35. Prose

Prose refers to written or spoken language that is in its ordinary form, without metrical structure or rhyme. It is the most common form of writing and is used in novels, essays, and everyday communication.

  • For example, “The book was written in beautiful prose.”
  • A literature professor might say, “Prose is the foundation of most forms of written communication.”
  • A reader might comment, “I prefer novels with poetic prose.”