Top 60 Slang For Committed – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to relationships, being committed is a vital ingredient for success. Whether it’s in love, friendship, or work, showing dedication and loyalty can take things to the next level. Join us as we explore the top slang terms that capture the essence of commitment in various aspects of life. Get ready to level up your slang game and impress everyone with your understanding of what it means to be truly committed.

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1. All in

This phrase is used to indicate complete dedication or commitment to a particular cause, goal, or relationship. It implies being willing to give everything and take risks.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m all in on this business venture. I’ve invested all my savings into it.”
  • In a game of poker, a player might declare, “I’m going all in!” indicating that they are betting all their chips.
  • In a romantic relationship, someone might say, “I’m all in for you. I’m ready to give my whole heart and soul.”

2. Ride or die

This phrase refers to someone who is fiercely loyal and committed to someone or something, even in difficult or dangerous situations. It implies being willing to go through anything together.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I’m your ride or die. I’ll always have your back, no matter what.”
  • In a relationship, someone might say, “I want a partner who is ride or die, someone who will stick with me through thick and thin.”
  • In a gang or criminal context, someone might say, “He’s a ride or die member. He’ll do anything for the gang.”

3. In it for the long haul

This phrase means being committed to something for an extended period of time, despite challenges or difficulties. It implies a willingness to stay dedicated and persevere.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m in it for the long haul with this job. I’m willing to work hard and grow in the company.”
  • In a marriage, someone might say, “We’re in it for the long haul. We’re committed to each other for life, no matter what.”
  • In a sports team, a player might say, “I’m in it for the long haul. I want to win championships with this team.”

4. Locked in

This phrase means being completely focused and committed to a particular task, goal, or situation. It implies being fully engaged and dedicated to achieving success.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’m locked in for this exam. I’ve been studying non-stop.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I’m locked in for this game. I’m ready to give my all and help the team win.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “We’re locked in on this project. We’re determined to meet the deadline and deliver excellent results.”

5. Dedicated

This term refers to someone who is committed and devoted to a particular cause, activity, or person. It implies a strong sense of loyalty and passion.

  • For example, a musician might be dedicated to their craft, practicing for hours every day.
  • In a relationship, someone might say, “I’m dedicated to making this work. I’m willing to put in the effort and compromise.”
  • In a charitable organization, a volunteer might be dedicated to helping those in need, spending their free time assisting others.

6. Invested

When someone is invested in something, they are fully dedicated or involved in it. It implies a strong emotional or personal commitment to a particular cause, project, or relationship.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m really invested in this charity and its mission.”
  • In a conversation about a long-term career, someone might say, “I’m invested in this company and want to see it succeed.”
  • A friend might comment, “She’s really invested in her relationship and puts a lot of effort into making it work.”

7. True blue

When someone is described as “true blue,” it means they are loyal and committed. It implies unwavering support and dedication to a person, cause, or belief.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “He’s a true blue friend who always has your back.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s fan base, someone might comment, “The true blue fans are the ones who stick with the team through thick and thin.”
  • A colleague might note, “She’s a true blue employee who always goes above and beyond for the company.”

8. Committed as a tick on a dog

This phrase is used to emphasize someone’s extreme commitment or dedication to a particular cause, project, or relationship. It compares the person’s commitment to a tick, which firmly attaches itself to a dog.

  • For example, a coach might say, “He’s as committed as a tick on a dog when it comes to training.”
  • In a discussion about a political activist, someone might comment, “She’s committed as a tick on a dog to fighting for social justice.”
  • A parent might say, “I’m committed as a tick on a dog to supporting my child’s dreams.”

9. Committed as a mule

When someone is described as “committed as a mule,” it means they are stubbornly committed or determined. It implies a strong will and perseverance in pursuing a particular goal or outcome.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “She’s committed as a mule to helping her students succeed.”
  • In a conversation about a marathon runner, someone might comment, “He’s committed as a mule to finishing every race he starts.”
  • A friend might note, “Once she sets her mind on something, she’s as committed as a mule and won’t give up.”

10. Committed as a clam

When someone is described as “committed as a clam,” it means they are quietly and steadfastly committed. It implies a strong dedication or loyalty that is not openly expressed or easily shaken.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “She’s as committed as a clam to meeting all her deadlines.”
  • In a discussion about a volunteer, someone might comment, “He’s committed as a clam to helping others, but he doesn’t seek recognition.”
  • A friend might note, “Even though she doesn’t talk about it much, she’s committed as a clam to her faith.”

11. Committed as a cat on a hot tin roof

This phrase is used to describe someone who is highly agitated or nervous, often due to a stressful situation. It conveys a sense of being on edge or unable to stay still.

  • For example, “She was committed as a cat on a hot tin roof before her big presentation.”
  • In a discussion about stage fright, someone might say, “I always get committed as a cat on a hot tin roof before going on stage.”
  • Another person might comment, “I was committed as a cat on a hot tin roof waiting for the exam results.”

12. Committed as a leech

This expression is used to describe someone who is excessively attached to or reliant on someone else. It implies a sense of being unable to let go or separate from the person they are attached to.

  • For instance, “He’s committed as a leech and can’t stand being away from his girlfriend.”
  • In a discussion about unhealthy relationships, someone might say, “She’s committed as a leech and can’t make decisions without her partner.”
  • Another person might comment, “I feel suffocated in this friendship. She’s committed as a leech.”

13. Committed as a cockroach in a nuclear war

This phrase is used to describe someone who is unwavering in their efforts to overcome obstacles or achieve their goals. It conveys a sense of resilience and tenacity, comparing the person to a cockroach that can survive even in the most extreme conditions.

  • For example, “Despite facing numerous setbacks, he remained committed as a cockroach in a nuclear war.”
  • In a discussion about perseverance, someone might say, “You have to be committed as a cockroach in a nuclear war to make it in this industry.”
  • Another person might comment, “I admire her determination. She’s committed as a cockroach in a nuclear war.”

14. Committed as a squirrel in traffic

This expression is used to describe someone who is constantly on the move or occupied with numerous tasks. It conveys a sense of busyness and frenetic energy, comparing the person to a squirrel navigating through traffic.

  • For instance, “She’s committed as a squirrel in traffic, always running from one meeting to another.”
  • In a discussion about work overload, someone might say, “I’ve been committed as a squirrel in traffic lately, trying to meet all the deadlines.”
  • Another person might comment, “I feel exhausted. My schedule has been committed as a squirrel in traffic.”

15. Committed as a monkey with a coconut

This phrase is used to describe someone who is intensely engrossed in a task or activity. It conveys a sense of single-mindedness and dedication, comparing the person to a monkey fixated on opening a coconut.

  • For example, “He’s committed as a monkey with a coconut when it comes to solving puzzles.”
  • In a discussion about passion, someone might say, “She’s committed as a monkey with a coconut to her art, spending hours perfecting every detail.”
  • Another person might comment, “I can’t stop thinking about this project. I’m committed as a monkey with a coconut.”

16. Committed as a hamster on a wheel

This phrase refers to someone who is fully dedicated to a task or goal, often to the point of being repetitive or unproductive. It implies a sense of constant motion without making progress.

  • For example, “She’s been working on that project for hours, she’s as committed as a hamster on a wheel.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s work ethic, one might say, “He never stops, he’s like a hamster on a wheel, always committed to getting things done.”
  • When describing someone’s persistence, you might hear, “She’s committed as a hamster on a wheel, she never gives up.”

17. Committed as a bull in a china shop

This phrase describes someone who is not careful or cautious and tends to cause damage or chaos. It implies a lack of control or consideration for one’s surroundings.

  • For instance, “He knocked over all the dishes in the kitchen, he’s as committed as a bull in a china shop.”
  • When discussing someone’s behavior, one might say, “He’s so careless, it’s like he’s a bull in a china shop, always causing accidents.”
  • When describing a person’s approach to a delicate situation, you might hear, “She needs to be more careful, she’s as committed as a bull in a china shop and could ruin everything.”

18. Committed as a kangaroo in a boxing match

This phrase describes someone who is enthusiastic and ready to take on a challenge or confrontation. It implies a sense of energy and determination.

  • For example, “He jumped right into the argument, he’s as committed as a kangaroo in a boxing match.”
  • When discussing someone’s eagerness, one might say, “She’s always ready for a challenge, she’s like a kangaroo in a boxing match, always committed to proving herself.”
  • When describing someone’s determination, you might hear, “He never backs down, he’s committed as a kangaroo in a boxing match, always fighting for what he believes in.”

19. Committed as a penguin to its mate

This phrase describes someone who is deeply dedicated and loyal to a person or cause. It implies a strong emotional connection and unwavering commitment.

  • For instance, “He’s been by her side through thick and thin, he’s as committed as a penguin to its mate.”
  • When discussing someone’s loyalty, one might say, “She’s always there for her friends, she’s like a penguin to its mate, always committed to supporting them.”
  • When describing a person’s dedication, you might hear, “He’s committed as a penguin to its mate, he would do anything for his family.”

20. Committed as a bee to honey

This phrase describes someone who is completely dedicated and focused on a particular task or goal. It implies a strong attraction or attachment.

  • For example, “She’s been working non-stop on her painting, she’s as committed as a bee to honey.”
  • When discussing someone’s determination, one might say, “He’s so focused, it’s like he’s a bee to honey, always committed to achieving his goals.”
  • When describing a person’s unwavering dedication, you might hear, “She’s committed as a bee to honey, nothing can distract her from her work.”

21. Committed as a rock in a storm

This phrase describes someone who is extremely committed and steadfast, even in difficult or challenging situations.

  • For example, “She stayed committed as a rock in a storm and never wavered in her support.”
  • In a discussion about loyalty, someone might say, “I need friends who are as committed as a rock in a storm.”
  • A coach might praise their team by saying, “You all showed incredible commitment, staying as committed as a rock in a storm until the very end.”

22. Committed as a tick

This phrase compares someone’s level of commitment to that of a tick, which is known for firmly attaching itself to its host.

  • For instance, “He’s committed as a tick to his goals and never gives up.”
  • In a conversation about work ethic, one might say, “I admire her dedication; she’s committed as a tick.”
  • A teacher might compliment a student by saying, “You’ve shown incredible commitment to your studies, staying as committed as a tick throughout the semester.”

23. Sticking with it

This phrase emphasizes the act of staying committed and not giving up, even when faced with challenges or obstacles.

  • For example, “I’m sticking with it, no matter how difficult it gets.”
  • In a discussion about perseverance, someone might say, “Success comes to those who stick with it.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Keep sticking with it, and we’ll come out on top.”

24. In for the duration

This phrase indicates a commitment to seeing something through until the very end, without giving up or quitting.

  • For instance, “I’m in for the duration; I won’t stop until I achieve my goal.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “If we’re going to be together, we need to be in for the duration.”
  • A leader might motivate their team by saying, “Remember, we’re in this together for the duration. Let’s give it our all.”

25. All aboard

This phrase is often used to signify everyone’s commitment and readiness to embark on a journey or endeavor together.

  • For example, “We’re all aboard for this project and ready to give it our best.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “When everyone is all aboard, great things can be accomplished.”
  • A coach might rally their team by saying, “All aboard, let’s give it everything we’ve got!”

26. Got your back

This phrase means to be there for someone and provide support or assistance when they need it. It implies loyalty and a willingness to help.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Don’t worry, I’ve got your back if anything goes wrong.”
  • In a team setting, a coworker might assure, “You can count on me to have your back during the presentation.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “No matter what, remember that I always have your back.”

27. All in it together

This phrase means that everyone is committed to a common goal or objective, and they are all actively participating and working together to achieve it.

  • For instance, a coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’re all in it together, and we can only succeed if we work as a team.”
  • In a group project, a student might say, “Let’s remember that we’re all in it together and support each other.”
  • A colleague might remind their coworkers, “We’re facing a challenging deadline, but if we’re all in it together, we can get it done.”

28. Ride the wave

This phrase means to embrace and go along with a situation or trend, rather than resisting or trying to control it. It implies a willingness to adapt and make the best of a situation.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I’m just going to ride the wave and see where it takes me.”
  • In a rapidly changing industry, a professional might advise, “Instead of fighting against the changes, let’s ride the wave and find new opportunities.”
  • A friend might say, “Life is unpredictable, but if we ride the wave together, we’ll make the most of it.”

29. Stand by you

This phrase means to be there for someone and offer support, especially during challenging or difficult times. It implies loyalty, empathy, and a willingness to provide assistance.

  • For instance, a partner might promise, “I will always stand by you, no matter what.”
  • In a friendship, someone might say, “I’ll stand by you through thick and thin.”
  • A parent might reassure their child, “Remember, I’ll always stand by you and support your decisions.”

30. In the trenches

This phrase refers to being deeply involved in a difficult or challenging task or situation, often implying a sense of camaraderie and teamwork.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “We’re in the trenches together, working towards a common goal.”
  • In a high-pressure project, someone might say, “We’re all in the trenches, but if we support each other, we’ll come out stronger.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Remember, we’re in the trenches together, fighting for victory.”

31. Joined at the hip

This phrase is used to describe two people who are always together and do everything together. It emphasizes the strong bond and commitment between the individuals.

  • For example, “Those two are joined at the hip. They’re always together, no matter what.”
  • In a conversation about best friends, someone might say, “We’ve been joined at the hip since we were kids.”
  • When discussing a couple who are always together, a person might comment, “They’re like two peas in a pod, joined at the hip.”

32. In for a penny, in for a pound

This phrase means that once you’ve made a small commitment or taken a small risk, you might as well go all the way and take bigger risks or make bigger commitments. It implies a willingness to fully commit and not hold back.

  • For instance, if someone is considering investing a small amount of money, another person might say, “Well, if you’re in for a penny, you might as well be in for a pound.”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “I’ve already come this far, so I’m in for a penny, in for a pound.”
  • When talking about someone who is fully committed to a cause, a person might comment, “He’s not afraid to take risks. He’s in for a penny, in for a pound.”

33. All chips in

This phrase means to put all your resources, effort, or energy into something. It signifies complete commitment and dedication to a cause or goal.

  • For example, in a conversation about a team’s dedication, someone might say, “They’re all chips in. They’re giving it their all.”
  • When discussing someone who is fully committed to a project, a person might comment, “She’s put all her chips in. She’s giving it everything she’s got.”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “If you want to succeed, you have to be willing to put all your chips in.”

34. Down for the cause

This phrase means to be fully committed and dedicated to a cause or goal. It implies a willingness to support and actively participate in achieving the desired outcome.

  • For instance, if someone asks for volunteers to help with a charity event, a person might say, “I’m down for the cause. Count me in.”
  • In a discussion about activism, someone might say, “She’s always down for the cause. She’s passionate about making a difference.”
  • When talking about someone who is committed to fighting for a specific issue, a person might comment, “He’s down for the cause. He’ll do whatever it takes to bring about change.”

35. Ride shotgun

This phrase originally referred to the person who sat next to the stagecoach driver and was responsible for protecting the coach with a shotgun. In modern usage, it means to be a loyal and committed supporter or companion, always by someone’s side.

  • For example, in a conversation about a close friend, someone might say, “She’s been riding shotgun for me through thick and thin.”
  • When discussing a person who is always there to support and help, a person might comment, “He’s my ride shotgun. I know I can count on him.”
  • In a discussion about a loyal partner, someone might say, “She’s been riding shotgun with him for years. They’re a great team.”

36. Stand by

This slang phrase means to stay with or support someone or something, especially during difficult times or challenging situations.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’ll stand by you no matter what.”
  • In a team setting, a coach might encourage their players by saying, “We need to stand by each other and work together to win this game.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their commitment to a cause or belief by saying, “I will stand by my principles and fight for what I believe in.”

37. Ride out the storm

This slang phrase means to endure or survive a challenging or difficult situation, often with the hope that things will improve over time.

  • For instance, someone might say, “We just need to ride out the storm and things will get better.”
  • During a tough period in a relationship, a person might advise their friend, “Hang in there and ride out the storm. It will pass.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We’re facing some tough times, but if we stick together, we can ride out the storm.”

38. Shoulder to shoulder

This slang phrase refers to working closely with someone, often in a supportive or collaborative manner. It suggests a strong bond and unity between individuals.

  • For example, a coach might say, “We need to stand shoulder to shoulder and give it our all.”
  • In a team project, a colleague might say, “Let’s work shoulder to shoulder to get this done.”
  • A friend might express their loyalty by saying, “I’ll always be there for you, shoulder to shoulder.”

39. Ride the same wave

This slang phrase means to be in agreement or have the same understanding or approach as someone else. It suggests a sense of unity and harmony.

  • For instance, in a group discussion, someone might say, “I think we’re all riding the same wave here.”
  • When two friends have similar thoughts or reactions, one might say, “Great minds think alike. We’re definitely riding the same wave.”
  • In a business meeting, a team leader might say, “Let’s make sure we’re all riding the same wave and working towards the same goal.”

40. Ride the high

This slang phrase means to fully embrace and enjoy a positive or successful situation. It suggests taking advantage of the moment and making the most of it.

  • For example, after winning a game, a player might say, “Let’s ride the high and keep up the momentum.”
  • When experiencing a period of success, a person might say, “I’m going to ride the high and make the most of this opportunity.”
  • In a celebratory context, someone might say, “We’re on top of the world right now. Let’s ride the high and celebrate our achievements.”

41. Ride the low

This phrase is used to describe someone who is committed to a situation or relationship even when it gets difficult or challenging.

  • For example, “Despite all the obstacles, she decided to ride the low and work through the problems in her marriage.”
  • In a discussion about career struggles, someone might say, “You have to ride the low and keep pushing forward to achieve your goals.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “I know it’s tough right now, but you can ride the low and come out stronger on the other side.”

42. Ride the rollercoaster

This expression is used to describe someone who is fully committed to experiencing all the highs and lows of a particular situation or relationship.

  • For instance, “She’s willing to ride the rollercoaster of emotions that comes with being in a long-distance relationship.”
  • In a conversation about starting a business, someone might say, “Entrepreneurship is a wild ride, but if you’re willing to ride the rollercoaster, the rewards can be great.”
  • A friend might advise another, “Don’t be afraid to ride the rollercoaster of life. It’s what makes the journey worthwhile.”

43. Ride the journey

This phrase is used to encourage someone to stay committed and dedicated to the journey or process of achieving a goal or reaching a destination.

  • For example, “Even when things get tough, she’s determined to ride the journey and see it through to the end.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “The key to success is to embrace the challenges and ride the journey of self-improvement.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee, “Remember, it’s not just about the destination. It’s about learning and growing as you ride the journey.”

44. Ride the adventure

This expression is used to describe someone who is fully committed to experiencing all the excitement, thrills, and uncertainties that come with a particular situation or relationship.

  • For instance, “She’s always up for a new adventure and willing to ride the adventure, no matter where it takes her.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might say, “When you ride the adventure of exploring new places, you never know what amazing experiences you’ll have.”
  • A friend might encourage another, “Life is an adventure. Embrace the unknown and ride the adventure with an open mind.”

45. Ride the unknown

This phrase is used to describe someone who is committed to venturing into unknown or unfamiliar territory, whether it’s in relationships, career, or personal growth.

  • For example, “She’s not afraid to ride the unknown and take risks in order to discover new opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about trying new things, someone might say, “Don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone and ride the unknown. That’s where the magic happens.”
  • A mentor might encourage their mentee, “The path to success is often filled with uncertainty. Stay committed and ride the unknown with confidence.”

46. Ride the path

This phrase means to stay on track and remain committed to a particular path or goal. It implies perseverance and determination.

  • For example, a motivational speaker might say, “Don’t let obstacles deter you, just ride the path to success.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Stay focused and ride the path to victory.”
  • In a personal development context, someone might advise, “When things get tough, keep your eye on the prize and ride the path to self-improvement.”

47. Ride the wave of life

This phrase suggests embracing and fully experiencing the highs and lows of life. It implies a commitment to living life to the fullest.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Instead of resisting change, ride the wave of life and see where it takes you.”
  • A person reflecting on their experiences might say, “I’ve learned to ride the wave of life and appreciate both the good and the challenging moments.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might advise, “Don’t be afraid to take risks and ride the wave of life’s opportunities.”

48. Ride the wave of love

This phrase means to fully embrace and commit to a romantic relationship, being open to the emotions and experiences that come with it.

  • For example, someone might say, “When you find someone special, don’t hesitate to ride the wave of love.”
  • A person talking about their relationship might say, “We’ve had our ups and downs, but we’re committed to riding the wave of love together.”
  • In a discussion about finding love, someone might advise, “Open your heart and be ready to ride the wave of love when it comes your way.”

49. Ride the wave of friendship

This phrase means to remain dedicated to and actively maintain friendships. It implies being there for friends through both good times and bad.

  • For instance, someone might say, “True friends are worth the effort, so ride the wave of friendship.”
  • A person reflecting on their friendships might say, “I’ve learned to ride the wave of friendship by being there for my friends when they need me.”
  • In a conversation about building strong friendships, someone might advise, “Invest time and energy into your friendships and ride the wave of connection.”

50. Ride the wave of success

This phrase means to remain dedicated to pursuing success and not letting setbacks or failures deter you. It implies a commitment to continuous improvement and growth.

  • For example, a motivational speaker might say, “Don’t give up when faced with challenges, ride the wave of success and keep pushing forward.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I’ve had my fair share of failures, but I’m committed to riding the wave of success and achieving my goals.”
  • In a conversation about personal achievements, someone might advise, “Stay focused, work hard, and ride the wave of success to reach your full potential.”

51. Gung ho

This term originated from a Chinese phrase meaning “work together” and was popularized by the U.S. Marines during World War II. It refers to someone who is extremely enthusiastic and fully committed to a task or goal.

  • For example, a coach might say, “I need everyone on this team to be gung ho about winning the championship.”
  • A supervisor might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s tackle this project with a gung ho attitude.”
  • A friend might describe someone as “always gung ho about trying new things.”
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52. On board

This term comes from the nautical phrase meaning someone is physically on a ship. In slang, it means to be in agreement or committed to a plan or idea.

  • For instance, during a team meeting, a colleague might say, “Is everyone on board with the new strategy?”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you on board for a road trip this weekend?”
  • A manager might say, “We need everyone on board to meet the project deadline.”

53. Signed, sealed, delivered

This phrase comes from the process of sending a letter or package. When something is signed, sealed, and delivered, it means it is fully committed or completed.

  • For example, a couple might say, “Our wedding invitations are signed, sealed, and delivered.”
  • A business owner might declare, “The contract is signed, sealed, and delivered, and we can now start the project.”
  • A friend might say, “I have your birthday present signed, sealed, and delivered.”

54. All out

This phrase means to give maximum effort or commitment to a task or goal.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “I want you to give it your all and go all out on the field.”
  • A colleague might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s give this project our all and go all out to impress the client.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m going all out for my birthday party with decorations, food, and entertainment.”

55. In the game

This phrase means to be fully committed and actively involved in a situation or activity.

  • For example, a coach might say, “If you want to win, you have to be in the game both mentally and physically.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’m fully in the game and ready to contribute to the team’s success.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m in the game for planning our group vacation and researching the best destinations.”

56. In the loop

This slang phrase refers to being informed and included in a group or activity. It means that you are up to date with the latest information and are actively participating in discussions or decision-making processes.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Hey, did you hear about the new project?” you can respond, “Yeah, I’m in the loop on that.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Make sure to keep me in the loop about any updates.”
  • A friend might tell you, “I’ll keep you in the loop about our plans for the weekend.”

57. On the team

This slang phrase indicates that you are a member of a team or group. It implies that you are actively involved and committed to working together towards a common goal.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Who’s working on the project?” you can say, “I’m on the team.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We need players who are dedicated and willing to be on the team.”
  • A friend might invite you to join a club by saying, “We’re looking for new members. Are you interested in being on the team?”

58. In the know

This slang phrase means that you are aware of and knowledgeable about a particular topic or situation. It implies that you have access to inside information or have insights that others may not be aware of.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you know what’s happening with the project?” you can respond, “Yeah, I’m in the know.”
  • In a gossip conversation, someone might say, “I’ll fill you in on all the details. You’ll be in the know.”
  • A colleague might compliment your expertise by saying, “You’re always in the know when it comes to industry trends.”

59. In cahoots

This slang phrase suggests that you are working closely with someone, often in a secretive or conspiratorial manner. It implies a level of trust and shared goals between the individuals involved.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Why are you always together with that person?” you can say, “We’re in cahoots.”
  • In a planning conversation, someone might say, “Let’s get in cahoots and come up with a strategy.”
  • A friend might jokingly accuse you of being in cahoots with someone by saying, “I see you two whispering. Are you in cahoots?”

60. In the groove

This slang phrase means that you are in a state of optimal performance and rhythm. It suggests that you are fully engaged and operating at your best, often in a creative or professional context.

  • For example, if someone asks, “How’s your work going?” you can say, “I’m in the groove right now.”
  • In a music discussion, someone might say, “The band was really in the groove during that performance.”
  • A colleague might compliment your productivity by saying, “You’re definitely in the groove today. Keep up the great work!”