Top 40 Slang For Conviction – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about conviction, the slang can be just as powerful as the concept itself. Whether you’re a law enthusiast or just curious about the lingo used in the courtroom, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we break down some of the most intriguing and impactful slang terms for conviction that you might not have heard before. Get ready to expand your legal lexicon and gain a deeper understanding of this fascinating topic!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Collared

This term refers to the act of being arrested or apprehended by law enforcement. It is often used to describe someone who has been caught in the act of committing a crime.

  • For example, “The suspect was collared by the police after a high-speed chase.”
  • In a news report, it might be stated, “The notorious criminal was finally collared by authorities.”
  • A witness to a crime might say, “I saw the thief being collared by the security guard.”

2. Banged up

This slang term refers to being incarcerated or imprisoned. It can also be used to describe someone who has been physically injured.

  • For instance, “He got banged up in a fight and ended up in jail.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might mention, “I heard he got banged up for armed robbery.”
  • A person might say, “I hope they catch the person responsible and get them banged up for a long time.”

3. Pinched

To be “pinched” means to be taken into custody by law enforcement. It is commonly used to describe someone who has been arrested or detained.

  • For example, “The suspect was pinched by the police during a routine traffic stop.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “I was pinched for a crime I didn’t commit.”
  • A news headline might read, “Notorious gang leader finally pinched by authorities.”

4. Cuffed

This term refers to being handcuffed or restrained by law enforcement. It can also be used more broadly to describe being caught or apprehended.

  • For instance, “The suspect was cuffed and placed in the back of the police car.”
  • In a discussion about police procedures, someone might mention, “Once the suspect is cuffed, they are read their rights.”
  • A witness to a crime might say, “I saw the perpetrator being cuffed by the police.”

5. Locked up

To be “locked up” means to be imprisoned or confined. It is a slang term often used to describe someone who has been sentenced to prison.

  • For example, “He was locked up for ten years for his involvement in the drug trade.”
  • In a conversation about criminal justice, someone might say, “We need to reform the system to reduce the number of people locked up.”
  • A news report might state, “The serial killer has been locked up for life, ensuring the safety of the community.”

6. Slammered

This term refers to being sent to prison or being put behind bars. It is often used to describe someone who has been convicted of a crime and is serving a sentence in a correctional facility.

  • For example, “He got slammered for robbery and is serving a 10-year sentence.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “Once you get slammered, it’s hard to get your life back on track.”
  • A news article might report, “The notorious gang leader was finally slammered after years of eluding the authorities.”

7. Sent up the river

This phrase originated from the practice of sending prisoners from New York City to the infamous Sing Sing Correctional Facility, which was located up the Hudson River. It is used to describe someone being convicted and given a lengthy prison sentence.

  • For instance, “He was sent up the river for 20 years for his involvement in organized crime.”
  • In a discussion about the justice system, one might say, “Harsh penalties like being sent up the river don’t always deter criminals.”
  • A crime novel might describe a character as, “A hardened criminal who had been sent up the river multiple times.”

8. Put away

This slang term refers to someone being sentenced to prison. It is a broad term that can be used to describe any length of imprisonment, from a short sentence to a life sentence.

  • For example, “He was put away for 5 years for drug trafficking.”
  • In a conversation about crime rates, someone might say, “We need stricter laws to put away repeat offenders.”
  • A news headline might read, “Serial killer finally put away after decades of evading capture.”

9. Jugged

This slang term is used to describe someone being incarcerated or put in jail. It can also refer to being caught by the authorities and facing legal consequences.

  • For instance, “He was jugged for assault and spent the night in jail.”
  • In a discussion about crime prevention, someone might say, “Harsher penalties are needed to keep repeat offenders from getting jugged.”
  • A crime documentary might describe a suspect as, “A notorious criminal who had been jugged multiple times.”

10. Sent down

This phrase is commonly used in the UK and refers to someone being convicted and given a prison sentence. It implies being sent to a lower level or lower status, which is often associated with being incarcerated.

  • For example, “He was sent down for 10 years for his involvement in a major fraud.”
  • In a conversation about the justice system, someone might say, “Sentencing guidelines need to be reformed to ensure fair and consistent sentences for those sent down.”
  • A news report might state, “The corrupt politician was finally sent down after a lengthy trial.”

11. Behind bars

This slang term refers to being incarcerated or serving time in prison.

  • For example, “After being found guilty, he spent 10 years behind bars.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous celebrity behind bars for tax evasion.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “Once you’re behind bars, you lose your freedom.”

12. Doing time

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of being incarcerated or serving time in prison.

  • For instance, “He was convicted of robbery and is now doing time.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I did 5 years in prison for drug possession.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice, someone might argue, “People who commit serious crimes should do significant time.”

13. Nicked

This slang term is commonly used in British English to mean being arrested or taken into custody by the police.

  • For example, “He got nicked for shoplifting.”
  • A news report might say, “The suspect was nicked in a high-speed chase.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might ask, “Have you ever been nicked by the police?”

14. Put in the clink

This slang phrase means to be arrested and put in jail or prison.

  • For instance, “The thief was caught and put in the clink.”
  • A person might say, “If you break the law, you’ll end up in the clink.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might argue, “We need tougher laws to put more criminals in the clink.”

15. Convicted

This term refers to being officially declared guilty of a crime by a court of law.

  • For example, “He was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison.”
  • A news headline might read, “Former CEO convicted of fraud.”
  • In a discussion about the criminal justice system, someone might argue, “Innocent until proven guilty is a fundamental principle for the convicted.”

16. Guilty as charged

This phrase is used to express someone’s admission of guilt or acceptance of responsibility for a crime they have been accused of.

  • For example, during a court hearing, a defendant might say, “Your Honor, I plead guilty as charged.”
  • In a conversation about a crime, someone might say, “The evidence was overwhelming, so he had no choice but to plead guilty as charged.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous celebrity pleads guilty as charged to tax evasion charges.”

17. Slapped with a sentence

This phrase is used to describe the act of being officially sentenced to a punishment or prison term by a judge or court.

  • For instance, during a court proceeding, a judge might say, “The defendant is hereby slapped with a sentence of five years in prison.”
  • In a news report about a high-profile trial, a journalist might write, “The convicted murderer was slapped with a life sentence without parole.”
  • In a conversation about criminal justice, someone might say, “If found guilty, they could be slapped with a sentence of up to ten years.”

18. Thrown in the slammer

This phrase is used to describe the act of being sent to prison or incarcerated for a crime.

  • For example, during a conversation about someone’s criminal history, someone might say, “He was thrown in the slammer for armed robbery.”
  • In a news article about a major drug bust, a journalist might write, “Several individuals involved in the drug ring were thrown in the slammer.”
  • In a movie about a prison escape, a character might say, “If we get caught, we’ll be thrown in the slammer for the rest of our lives.”

19. Convicted and sentenced

This phrase is used to describe the process of being found guilty of a crime and subsequently receiving a punishment or prison sentence.

  • For instance, during a court trial, a judge might say, “The defendant has been convicted and sentenced to five years in prison.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might argue, “The current system often leads to individuals being convicted and sentenced without proper consideration of their circumstances.”
  • In a news report about a high-profile case, a journalist might write, “After a lengthy trial, the defendant was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.”

20. Doing a stretch

This phrase is used to describe the act of serving a prison sentence or being incarcerated.

  • For example, during a conversation about someone’s criminal past, someone might say, “He’s currently doing a stretch for drug trafficking.”
  • In a news article about prison overcrowding, a journalist might write, “Many inmates are doing long stretches for non-violent offenses.”
  • In a movie about a prison escape, a character might say, “I’ve been doing a stretch for ten years, but I’m planning my escape.”

21. Sent up

When someone is “sent up,” it means that they have been given a prison sentence. This term is often used in reference to a criminal conviction and the subsequent punishment.

  • For example, “He was sent up for 10 years for robbery.”
  • In a news article, it might be written, “The judge sent the defendant up for life without parole.”
  • A conversation about a high-profile case might include the comment, “I can’t believe he was only sent up for 3 years.”

22. Racked up

To “rack up” convictions means to accumulate or gather multiple convictions for various crimes. This term is often used to describe someone with a long criminal record.

  • For instance, “He’s racked up 15 convictions over the past decade.”
  • In a discussion about repeat offenders, someone might say, “Once they start racking up convictions, it’s hard to break the cycle.”
  • A news report might state, “The notorious gang member has racked up a long list of convictions for drug trafficking and assault.”

23. On the inside

When someone is “on the inside,” it means they are currently serving a prison sentence. This slang term is often used to refer to someone who is incarcerated.

  • For example, “He’s been on the inside for the past 5 years.”
  • In a conversation about a friend who is in prison, someone might ask, “How’s he doing on the inside?”
  • A news article might mention, “The suspect was caught and is now on the inside awaiting trial.”

24. In the clink

When someone is “in the clink,” it means they are in jail or have been incarcerated. This slang term is often used casually to refer to someone who is serving a short-term sentence or awaiting trial.

  • For instance, “He spent a night in the clink for public intoxication.”
  • In a conversation about someone who got arrested, someone might say, “He’s currently in the clink, waiting for his court date.”
  • A news headline might read, “Local celebrity lands in the clink after DUI arrest.”

25. Popped

When someone is “popped,” it means they have been arrested by law enforcement. This slang term is often used to describe the act of being apprehended or taken into custody.

  • For example, “He was popped for shoplifting at the mall.”
  • In a conversation about a recent arrest, someone might say, “Did you hear that they finally popped the suspect in the murder case?”
  • A news report might state, “The notorious drug dealer was popped during a sting operation.”

26. Collared and booked

This phrase refers to the act of being apprehended by law enforcement and officially recorded in the criminal justice system. “Collared” refers to being caught or captured, while “booked” refers to the process of being recorded in the police records.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Suspect collared and booked in connection with the robbery.”
  • A police officer might say, “We collared and booked the suspect after a high-speed chase.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might describe the arrest by saying, “Once we collared him, we had enough evidence to book him for the crime.”

27. Slapped with a conviction

This phrase describes the act of being officially declared guilty of a crime by a court of law. “Slapped with” implies a sudden and forceful imposition of the conviction.

  • For instance, a news report might state, “The defendant was slapped with a conviction for murder.”
  • A lawyer might say, “My client was unfairly slapped with a conviction based on circumstantial evidence.”
  • In a conversation about criminal justice, someone might express their opinion by saying, “People shouldn’t be slapped with convictions without solid proof.”

28. Busted

This slang term refers to being apprehended by law enforcement, typically for engaging in illegal activities. “Busted” implies a sudden and unexpected capture.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We finally busted the drug dealer after months of surveillance.”
  • In a movie about undercover agents, a character might exclaim, “We’re about to get busted!”
  • A person discussing their past might say, “I got busted for shoplifting when I was a teenager.”

29. Sent away

This phrase describes the act of being sentenced to serve time in prison or another correctional facility. “Sent away” implies being removed from society and placed in a confined environment.

  • For instance, a news headline might read, “Serial killer finally sent away for life.”
  • A judge might say, “You have been found guilty and will be sent away for a minimum of five years.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might argue, “Non-violent offenders shouldn’t be sent away for minor offenses.”

30. In the slammer

This slang term refers to being incarcerated or serving time in prison. “Slammer” is a colloquial term for a prison or jail.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s been in the slammer for five years now.”
  • In a movie about a prison escape, a character might say, “I can’t spend another day in the slammer.”
  • A former inmate might share their experience by saying, “Life in the slammer is tough, but it taught me valuable lessons.”

31. Doing bird

This slang term refers to being incarcerated or serving time in prison. It is commonly used in British English.

  • For example, “He’s been doing bird for the past two years for armed robbery.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “If you get caught, you’ll end up doing bird.”
  • A person discussing their past might mention, “I regret the choices I made that led to me doing bird.”

32. In the pen

This slang term is short for “penitentiary” and refers to being incarcerated or serving time in prison. It is commonly used in American English.

  • For instance, “He’s been in the pen for five years for drug trafficking.”
  • In a discussion about the criminal justice system, someone might say, “Once you’re in the pen, it’s hard to get out.”
  • A person sharing their experiences might say, “I learned a lot while I was in the pen, and it changed my perspective on life.”

33. Doing porridge

This slang term, popular in British English, refers to being incarcerated or serving time in prison. The term “porridge” refers to the traditional dish often served in prisons.

  • For example, “He’s been doing porridge for the past decade for fraud.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “If you get caught, you’ll end up doing porridge.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “I made some bad choices and ended up doing porridge, but it taught me valuable lessons.”

34. Doing a bid

This slang term refers to being incarcerated or serving time in prison. It is commonly used in American English.

  • For instance, “He’s been doing a bid for armed robbery.”
  • In a discussion about the consequences of criminal activities, someone might say, “If you commit a serious crime, you’ll end up doing a bid.”
  • A person sharing their experiences might say, “I spent five years doing a bid, and it made me realize the importance of making better choices.”

35. Doing a dime

This slang term specifically refers to serving a ten-year prison sentence. It is commonly used in American English.

  • For example, “He’s doing a dime for drug trafficking.”
  • In a conversation about the severity of a sentence, someone might say, “Ten years is a long time to be doing a dime.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “I made a series of bad decisions that led to me doing a dime, but it was a turning point in my life.”

36. In stir

This slang term refers to being incarcerated or serving time in prison.

  • For example, “He got caught with drugs and is now in stir.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “If you commit a serious offense, you’ll end up in stir.”
  • A person discussing their past might mention, “I spent a few years in stir for armed robbery.”

37. In the joint

This slang term is another way of saying someone is in prison or serving a sentence.

  • For instance, “He was convicted of fraud and is now in the joint.”
  • In a discussion about the criminal justice system, someone might say, “Too many young people end up in the joint for non-violent offenses.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I made some bad choices and ended up in the joint for a few years.”

38. In the big house

This slang term is used to refer to someone being in prison or serving time behind bars.

  • For example, “After his conviction, he ended up in the big house.”
  • In a conversation about crime rates, someone might say, “The number of people in the big house has been steadily increasing.”
  • A person discussing their past might mention, “I spent a decade in the big house for my involvement in a gang.”

39. Doing a bit

This slang term means someone is currently serving a prison sentence.

  • For instance, “He’s doing a bit for armed robbery.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might say, “We need to find alternatives to having so many people doing a bit.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I’m doing a bit for drug possession, but I’m using this time to turn my life around.”

40. Doing hard time

This slang term is used to describe someone serving a long or difficult prison sentence.

  • For example, “He’s doing hard time for his involvement in organized crime.”
  • In a conversation about the consequences of serious crimes, someone might say, “People who commit murder should be doing hard time.”
  • A person discussing their past might mention, “I did hard time for a violent offense, but I’ve learned my lesson and have changed.”
See also  Top 30 Slang For Husband – Meaning & Usage