Top 90 Slang For Completed – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the concept of “completed,” there are countless slang terms that have emerged in the English language. Whether you’re tired of using the same old phrases or simply want to expand your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang words and phrases for completed that are sure to add some flair to your conversations. Get ready to level up your slang game and impress your friends with these trendy expressions!

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1. A wrap

This phrase is used to indicate that something is finished or completed. It can refer to the completion of a task, project, or event.

  • For example, after completing a film shoot, a director might say, “That’s a wrap, everyone!”
  • In a work setting, a coworker might say, “Let’s get this project wrapped up by the end of the day.”
  • A student might say, “I finally got my essay wrapped up and submitted.”

2. All in

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is fully committed or dedicated to a task or activity. It implies that all effort or resources have been put into completing something.

  • For instance, a sports team might say, “We’re all in for the championship game.”
  • A person planning a surprise party might say, “I’m all in on making this the best party ever.”
  • In a business context, a colleague might say, “We need to be all in to meet the upcoming deadline.”

3. All over

This phrase is used to indicate that something has finished or come to an end. It can refer to the completion of an event, a situation, or a relationship.

  • For example, after a concert, someone might say, “The show is all over now.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “The game is all over, and the home team has emerged victorious.”
  • A person discussing a breakup might say, “Our relationship is all over, and it’s time to move on.”

4. Brought about

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something has caused a particular outcome or result to happen. It implies that someone has taken action to bring about a specific outcome.

  • For instance, a leader might say, “Our team’s hard work brought about this success.”
  • A social activist might say, “We hope our efforts can bring about positive change.”
  • A person discussing a major decision might say, “I believe this choice will bring about a better future.”

5. Brought to pass

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something has made a particular event or outcome happen. It implies that someone has taken action or made efforts to ensure the completion of something.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “We brought this plan to pass through careful coordination.”
  • A politician might say, “We need to work together to bring these reforms to pass.”
  • A mentor might say, “With dedication and perseverance, you can bring your dreams to pass.”

6. Depleted

When something is depleted, it means that it has been fully used or consumed, leaving nothing remaining. This term can be used to describe both physical and non-physical resources.

  • For example, “After running a marathon, I felt completely depleted of energy.”
  • In a conversation about natural resources, someone might say, “We need to find alternative energy sources before we deplete all of our fossil fuels.”
  • Another example could be, “I’ve been studying all night and my brain feels depleted.”

7. Drained

To be drained means to be completely exhausted or emptied, both physically and emotionally. This term is often used to describe a person’s energy or resources.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I feel mentally and physically drained.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Dealing with toxic people can leave you emotionally drained.”
  • Another example could be, “I spent all my money on bills and now my bank account is drained.”

8. Effected

When something is effected, it means that it has been brought about or accomplished. This term is often used to describe the successful completion of a task or the realization of a desired outcome.

  • For example, “The changes we implemented have effectively effected positive results.”
  • In a conversation about business strategies, someone might say, “We need to come up with a plan that will effectively effect growth.”
  • Another example could be, “The new regulations have effectively effected a decrease in pollution levels.”

9. Ended

To be ended means to be brought to a conclusion or finished. This term is commonly used to describe the completion of an activity, event, or process.

  • For instance, “The meeting ended on a positive note, with everyone in agreement.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “We decided to end our romantic relationship but remain friends.”
  • Another example could be, “The concert ended with a spectacular fireworks display.”

10. Executed

When something is executed, it means that it has been carried out or completed with precision and skill. This term is often used to describe the successful completion of a task or the implementation of a plan.

  • For example, “The project was executed flawlessly, resulting in a high-quality product.”
  • In a conversation about sports, someone might say, “The team executed their game plan perfectly and came out with a win.”
  • Another example could be, “The chef executed the recipe with precision, creating a delicious dish.”

11. Exhausted

This slang term is used to describe a state of extreme fatigue or tiredness. It can also mean that a task or activity has been completed or finished.

  • For example, “After running a marathon, I was completely exhausted.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been studying all night, and I’m exhausted.”
  • In a work context, a colleague might ask, “Are you exhausted after finishing that big project?”

12. Fixed

In slang terms, “fixed” means that something has been completed or resolved. It can also imply that a problem has been fixed or solved.

  • For instance, “I finally fixed my car after it broke down.”
  • A person might say, “I fixed the issue with my computer and it’s working perfectly now.”
  • In a conversation about a broken appliance, someone might ask, “Have you fixed the washing machine yet?”

13. Fulfilled

This slang term refers to a sense of completion or satisfaction after achieving a goal or fulfilling a desire. It can also mean that a task or responsibility has been completed.

  • For example, “I feel fulfilled after finishing my degree.”
  • Someone might say, “I fulfilled my dream of traveling the world.”
  • In a work context, a colleague might say, “I fulfilled all the requirements for the project.”

14. Over

In slang terms, “over” means that something has been completed or finished. It can also indicate that a situation or event has come to an end.

  • For instance, “The party is over, everyone has gone home.”
  • A person might say, “I’m glad the semester is over, now I can relax.”
  • In a conversation about a completed project, someone might ask, “Is it over? Did you finish it?”

15. Perfected

This slang term means that something has been completed or finished to a high degree of excellence or perfection. It can also imply that a skill or technique has been mastered.

  • For example, “She perfected her recipe after many attempts.”
  • Someone might say, “He has perfected his golf swing through years of practice.”
  • In a conversation about an artwork, a person might comment, “The artist has perfected every detail.”

16. Performed

This word is often used to indicate that a task or action has been completed or carried out. It can also refer to a performance or act that has been executed.

  • For example, “I performed all the necessary steps to complete the project.”
  • A musician might say, “I performed my new song at the concert last night.”
  • In a theater production, someone might comment, “The actors performed their roles flawlessly.”

17. Realized

When something is realized, it means that it has been successfully accomplished or achieved. It can also refer to the act of becoming aware or understanding something.

  • For instance, “I realized my dream of starting my own business.”
  • A person might say, “I finally realized my goal of running a marathon.”
  • In a personal development context, someone might share, “I realized the importance of self-care and started prioritizing it.”

18. Rendered

To render something means to deliver or provide it, often in a completed or finished state. It can also refer to the act of causing something to be or become a certain way.

  • For example, “The artist rendered a beautiful portrait of her subject.”
  • A chef might say, “I rendered the sauce to perfection.”
  • In a legal context, someone might comment, “The judge rendered a fair verdict in the case.”

19. Set

In slang terms, “set” can be used to indicate that something has been completed or finished. It can also refer to the act of placing or arranging something in a particular way.

  • For instance, “I set the table for dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I set all my tasks for the day and completed them.”
  • In a construction context, someone might comment, “The workers set the foundation for the building.”

20. Spent

When something is “spent,” it means that it has been fully used up or exhausted. It can also refer to the act of using time or resources to complete a task or activity.

  • For example, “I spent all my energy on that project.”
  • A person might say, “I spent the entire day cleaning the house.”
  • In a financial context, someone might comment, “I spent all my savings on that vacation.”

21. Done and dusted

This phrase is used to indicate that a task or activity has been fully completed or accomplished. It implies that all necessary steps or actions have been taken and there is nothing left to do.

  • For example, after finishing a project, someone might say, “Finally, it’s done and dusted!”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The game is done and dusted, with no chance for a comeback.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe a completed exam, saying, “I studied hard and now it’s done and dusted.”

22. Wrapped up

This phrase is used to indicate that something has come to an end or has been completed. It implies that all necessary actions or steps have been taken and there is nothing left to do.

  • For instance, after completing a presentation, someone might say, “And that’s a wrap! The project is wrapped up.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Let’s wrap up this meeting and move on to the next agenda item.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe finishing a book, saying, “I stayed up all night and finally wrapped up the last chapter.”

23. Finito

This slang term is used to indicate that something has been completed or finished. It is derived from the Italian word “finito,” which means “finished” or “done.”

  • For example, after completing a task, someone might say, “Finito! I can finally relax.”
  • In a cooking context, a chef might say, “The dish is finito, ready to be served.”
  • A person might use this term to describe completing a workout, saying, “I pushed through and now my workout is finito.”

24. In the bag

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been successfully completed or achieved. It implies that the task or goal is secured or guaranteed.

  • For instance, after winning a competition, someone might say, “Victory is in the bag!”
  • In a sales context, a salesperson might say, “I closed the deal. It’s in the bag.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe completing a challenging project, saying, “We worked hard, and now it’s in the bag.”

25. All done

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been fully completed or finished. It implies that all necessary actions or tasks have been accomplished and there is nothing left to do.

  • For example, after cleaning a room, someone might say, “All done! It’s spotless now.”
  • In a cooking context, a chef might say, “Dinner is all done and ready to be served.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe finishing a long day of work, saying, “Finally, all done for today.”

26. Mission accomplished

This phrase is often used to indicate that a task or objective has been successfully completed. It carries a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction.

  • For example, after finishing a difficult project, someone might say, “Mission accomplished!”
  • In a military context, a commander might declare, “Our mission is accomplished. We can now return home.”
  • A person might use this phrase to celebrate completing a personal challenge, saying, “I trained for months, and today, mission accomplished!”

27. Tick off

To “tick off” means to mark or check something off a list or to complete a task. It implies a sense of progress and accomplishment.

  • For instance, when completing items on a to-do list, someone might say, “I just ticked off three tasks!”
  • In a conversation about meeting goals, a person might mention, “I’m slowly ticking off all the items on my bucket list.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Make sure to tick off each step as you complete the assignment.”

28. Cross off

To “cross off” means to draw a line through an item on a list or to mark it as completed. It signifies the act of finishing a task or achieving a goal.

  • For example, when finishing a chore, someone might say, “I can finally cross off cleaning the garage from my list.”
  • In a discussion about progress, a person might mention, “I’ve crossed off all the tasks for today, and it feels great!”
  • A student might say, “I crossed off another assignment from my to-do list. Only a few more to go!”

29. Knock out

To “knock out” means to complete or finish something quickly and efficiently. It suggests a sense of productivity and accomplishment.

  • For instance, when completing a series of tasks, someone might say, “I knocked out all the assignments in just two hours!”
  • In a conversation about work, a person might mention, “I need to knock out this report before the deadline.”
  • A chef might say, “I can knock out this recipe in no time. Watch me!”

30. Wrap it up

To “wrap it up” means to complete or finish something, often with a sense of urgency or finality. It implies the need to bring a task or activity to an end.

  • For example, when concluding a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s wrap it up and summarize the key points.”
  • In a conversation about a project, a person might mention, “We need to wrap it up soon and present our findings.”
  • A director might tell the cast and crew, “We’re behind schedule, so let’s wrap it up quickly and move on to the next scene.”

31. Call it a day

This phrase is often used to indicate that it’s time to end a task or stop working for the day.

  • For example, after a long day of painting, someone might say, “Let’s call it a day and continue tomorrow.”
  • In a business meeting that has gone on for hours, someone might suggest, “I think we should call it a day and reconvene tomorrow.”
  • At the end of a tiring workout, a trainer might say, “Great job, everyone! Let’s call it a day and cool down.”

32. Tie up loose ends

This phrase is used to describe the act of completing or resolving any remaining loose ends or unfinished tasks.

  • For instance, before leaving on vacation, someone might say, “I need to tie up some loose ends at work before I go.”
  • In a project meeting, a team leader might say, “Let’s make sure to tie up any loose ends before submitting the final report.”
  • A writer finishing a novel might say, “I just have a few more chapters to write to tie up all the loose ends.”

33. Button up

This phrase is often used to describe the act of finishing or completing something in a tidy or organized way.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “Please button up your assignments and hand them in.”
  • In a construction project, a supervisor might instruct the workers, “Let’s button up this section and move on to the next.”
  • Someone tidying up their house might say, “I just need to button up the living room before guests arrive.”

34. Put to bed

This phrase is commonly used to describe the act of finishing or completing a task or project, often with the implication of finalizing or resolving it.

  • For instance, a manager might say to their team, “Let’s put this project to bed by the end of the week.”
  • A journalist finishing an article might say, “I just need to put the finishing touches and then it’s ready to be put to bed.”
  • A parent getting their child ready for bed might say, “Let’s put this bedtime routine to bed and get you tucked in.”

35. Get it over with

This phrase is used to express a desire or intention to complete or finish something quickly or without further delay.

  • For example, before a challenging task, someone might say, “Let’s just get it over with and move on.”
  • In a difficult conversation, one person might say, “I don’t want to drag this out. Let’s get it over with.”
  • A student taking a difficult exam might think to themselves, “I just want to get this exam over with and move on to the next subject.”

36. Close the book

This phrase means to complete or finish something, often in a final and decisive manner. It implies that all necessary actions or steps have been taken and the task is now complete.

  • For example, “After months of hard work, I can finally close the book on this project.”
  • In a discussion about a completed investigation, someone might say, “Once we close the book on this case, we can move on to the next.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “It’s time to close the book on this chapter and start studying for the next one.”

37. Put the finishing touches

This expression refers to adding the final details or making the final adjustments to complete something. It implies that the main work is done and only minor enhancements or refinements are needed.

  • For instance, “I just need to put the finishing touches on this painting before it’s ready for the exhibition.”
  • In a conversation about a completed renovation, someone might say, “We’re almost done – just need to put the finishing touches on the kitchen.”
  • A writer might say, “I’m putting the finishing touches on my novel before sending it to the publisher.”

38. Put the final nail in the coffin

This phrase means to do something that will finally bring an end to a situation or confirm its outcome. It often implies a decisive action or event that solidifies the completion or failure of something.

  • For example, “The team’s loss in the final game put the final nail in the coffin for their chances of making it to the playoffs.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business, someone might say, “The economic downturn was the final nail in the coffin for that company.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to put the final nail in the coffin of this argument by presenting undeniable evidence.”

39. Put the lid on

This expression means to finish or conclude something, often in a definitive or final manner. It implies that all necessary actions or steps have been taken and there is no more to be done.

  • For instance, “With the last signature, we can finally put the lid on this deal and celebrate.”
  • In a conversation about a completed project, someone might say, “Now that we’ve put the lid on this, let’s move on to the next challenge.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “We’re almost there – let’s put the lid on this quarter and start planning for the next.”

40. Wrap things up

This phrase means to finish or complete all remaining tasks or actions. It implies that the end is near and there are only a few loose ends to tie up.

  • For example, “Let’s wrap things up and finalize the report before the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about a meeting, someone might say, “We need to wrap things up so everyone can get to their next appointment.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “It’s time to wrap things up and hand in your assignments.”

41. Bring to a close

To bring something to an end or reach a final point.

  • For example, “Let’s bring the meeting to a close with a summary of our main points.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We need to bring this task to a close before the deadline.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “Make sure to bring your essays to a close with a strong conclusion.”

42. Wind up

To bring something to an end or complete a task.

  • For instance, “Let’s wind up this project by tying up all loose ends.”
  • In a discussion about a game, someone might say, “I need to wind up this level before I can move on.”
  • A person might comment on their day, saying, “I’m winding up my work for the day and getting ready to relax.”

43. Cap off

To bring something to a final and impactful conclusion.

  • For example, “The fireworks display was the perfect way to cap off the evening.”
  • In a conversation about a successful event, someone might say, “The keynote speaker really capped off the conference.”
  • A person might describe a memorable vacation, saying, “We capped off our trip with a sunset cruise.”

44. Draw to a close

To come to an end or reach a final point.

  • For instance, “As the day drew to a close, we reflected on our accomplishments.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The story draws to a close with a surprising twist.”
  • A person might comment on a relationship, saying, “Our time together is drawing to a close, but I’ll always cherish the memories.”

45. Round off

To bring something to a smooth and satisfying conclusion.

  • For example, “We’ll round off the meal with a delicious dessert.”
  • In a conversation about a presentation, someone might say, “Let’s round off our talk with a powerful closing statement.”
  • A person might describe a successful project, saying, “The team worked together to round off the project with a seamless transition.”

46. Finish off

When you finish off something, you complete it in a final and definitive way.

  • For example, “I need to finish off this project by the end of the day.”
  • In a game, a player might say, “I just need to finish off this level and then I’ll be done.”
  • Someone might say, “I finished off the last slice of pizza.”

47. Conclude

To conclude something means to bring it to an end or reach a final decision or result.

  • For instance, “Let’s conclude this meeting with a final decision.”
  • In a speech, someone might say, “In conclusion, I want to thank everyone for their support.”
  • A teacher might say, “We’ll conclude this lesson with a short quiz.”

48. Accomplish

When you accomplish something, you successfully complete a task or achieve a goal.

  • For example, “I feel accomplished after finishing my marathon.”
  • A student might say, “I accomplished my goal of getting an A on the test.”
  • A chef might say, “I accomplished the perfect balance of flavors in this dish.”

49. Achieve

To achieve something means to successfully reach a desired goal or obtain a desired result.

  • For instance, “She achieved her dream of becoming a published author.”
  • A coach might say, “Our team achieved victory in the championship game.”
  • A person might say, “I finally achieved the level of success I’ve been working towards.”

50. Completed

When something is completed, it is finished or done.

  • For example, “I just completed my final exam.”
  • In a to-do list, someone might check off an item and say, “This task is completed.”
  • A builder might say, “The construction project is now completed.”

51. Donezo

This slang term is often used to indicate that something is finished or completed. It can be used to describe tasks, projects, or even relationships.

  • For example, after completing a difficult assignment, someone might say, “Finally, I’m donezo!”
  • In a conversation about a breakup, a person might say, “I’m so glad that relationship is donezo.”
  • When discussing a completed renovation project, someone might say, “The kitchen remodel is officially donezo!”

52. Over and done with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is finished or completed, often with a sense of relief or finality. It implies that the task or situation is no longer a concern.

  • For instance, after a long and tiring workday, someone might say, “Thank goodness, the day is over and done with!”
  • In a conversation about a difficult exam, a student might say, “I’m so relieved that test is over and done with.”
  • When discussing a challenging project, someone might say, “I can’t wait for this to be over and done with.”

53. Sorted

This slang term is commonly used to indicate that something is completed or organized. It can refer to tasks, problems, or even personal matters.

  • For example, after finishing a list of errands, someone might say, “I’ve got everything sorted.”
  • In a conversation about finding a solution to a problem, someone might say, “Don’t worry, I’ve got it all sorted.”
  • When discussing personal finances, someone might say, “I have my budget all sorted out.”

54. Wrapped

This term is used to indicate that something is finished or completed, often with a sense of finality. It can refer to tasks, projects, or even events.

  • For instance, after completing a presentation, someone might say, “I’m glad that’s all wrapped up.”
  • In a conversation about a finished construction project, someone might say, “The building is finally wrapped.”
  • When discussing the end of a movie production, someone might say, “The filming is wrapped, and now it’s time for post-production.”

55. Ticked off

This slang term is often used to indicate that something has been completed or checked off a list. It implies a sense of accomplishment or progress.

  • For example, after finishing a series of tasks, someone might say, “I’ve ticked everything off my to-do list.”
  • In a conversation about completing errands, someone might say, “I’ve ticked off all the items on my shopping list.”
  • When discussing progress on a project, someone might say, “We’ve ticked off all the major milestones.”

56. Checked off

This phrase is used to indicate that a task or item on a list has been finished or accomplished. It implies that the action has been acknowledged and accounted for.

  • For example, “I checked off all the items on my to-do list for today.”
  • In a project management context, a team member might say, “I checked off the tasks assigned to me.”
  • A person organizing their belongings might say, “I checked off all the items in my inventory.”

57. Finalized

This term refers to the process of making something final or complete. It implies that all necessary steps have been taken and any required approvals or decisions have been made.

  • For instance, “We finalized the contract after months of negotiations.”
  • In a creative project, someone might say, “I finalized the design for the logo.”
  • A person discussing plans might say, “Once the details are finalized, we can move forward.”

58. Achieved

This word indicates that a desired outcome or goal has been successfully attained. It implies a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment.

  • For example, “She achieved her dream of becoming a published author.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “He achieved a personal best in the marathon.”
  • A person reflecting on their journey might say, “I’ve achieved so much in my career.”

59. Closed

To “close” something means to bring it to an end or to finish it. It implies that all necessary actions or steps have been taken and there is nothing more to be done.

  • For instance, “We closed the deal and signed the contract.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We closed the fiscal year with strong financial results.”
  • A person discussing a chapter in their life might say, “I closed that chapter and moved on.”

60. Settled

This term suggests that a matter or issue has been resolved or brought to a conclusion. It implies that any conflicts or uncertainties have been addressed and a decision or agreement has been reached.

  • For example, “They settled their differences and reached a compromise.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The case was settled out of court.”
  • A person discussing a negotiation might say, “We settled on a fair price for the car.”

61. Resolved

When something is resolved, it means that it has been completed or settled. It implies that a problem or issue has been addressed and resolved in a satisfactory manner.

  • For example, if a conflict between two parties is resolved, it means that they have reached a resolution or agreement.
  • In a discussion about completing a project, someone might say, “We finally resolved all the issues and completed the project on time.”
  • If a dispute is resolved in court, it means that a judgment or decision has been made to settle the matter.
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62. Accomplished

When something is accomplished, it means that a task or goal has been successfully completed or achieved. It implies a sense of achievement or success in completing a particular endeavor.

  • For instance, if a person finishes a marathon, they can say that they have accomplished their goal.
  • In a discussion about personal achievements, someone might say, “I feel accomplished after graduating from college.”
  • If a team successfully completes a project, they can say that they have accomplished their objectives.

63. Terminated

When something is terminated, it means that it has been ended or concluded. The term implies a formal or official ending, often associated with contracts, agreements, or employment.

  • For example, if a contract is terminated, it means that it has been legally ended or canceled.
  • In a discussion about a job, someone might say, “I was terminated from my previous position due to budget cuts.”
  • If a lease agreement is terminated, it means that the rental contract has come to an end.

64. Dispatched

When something is dispatched, it means that it has been sent off or completed quickly. The term often implies a sense of urgency or efficiency in completing a task or delivering something.

  • For instance, if a package is dispatched, it means that it has been sent out for delivery.
  • In a discussion about work tasks, someone might say, “I dispatched all the urgent emails before leaving for the day.”
  • If a team quickly completes a project, they can say that they have dispatched their tasks.

65. Settled up

When someone settles up, it means that they have paid or resolved a debt or financial obligation. The term often implies a finalization of a financial transaction or a resolution of a monetary matter.

  • For example, if a person pays their restaurant bill, they can say that they have settled up with the waiter.
  • In a discussion about financial matters, someone might say, “I need to settle up with my landlord for the rent.”
  • If a person pays off their credit card balance, they can say that they have settled up their debts.
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66. Capped off

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been completed or concluded. It suggests that the final touch or action has been added to bring the task or event to a close.

  • For example, “He capped off his performance with a stunning guitar solo.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to make sure we cap off all the loose ends before the deadline.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team capped off their undefeated season with a championship win.”

67. Sealed

To “seal” something means to make it official or complete. It implies that all necessary steps have been taken and there is no further action required.

  • For instance, “They sealed the deal with a handshake.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to seal this contract before the end of the day.”
  • A person talking about a successful negotiation might say, “We sealed the agreement with a mutually beneficial compromise.”

68. Wound up

To “wind up” or “wound up” means to reach the final result or outcome of something. It suggests that the situation or event has come to a conclusion.

  • For example, “After a series of unexpected events, they wound up winning the competition.”
  • In a conversation about a night out, someone might say, “We started at a small bar and wound up at a huge club.”
  • A person discussing a series of events might say, “It’s amazing how one small decision can wind up changing your entire life.”

69. Brought to a close

This phrase indicates that something has been brought to an end or finished. It implies that all necessary actions or steps have been taken to reach the final point.

  • For instance, “The meeting was brought to a close with a final round of applause.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The author did a great job of bringing the story to a close.”
  • A person talking about a project might say, “We need to bring this phase to a close before moving on to the next one.”

70. Brought to an end

To “bring something to an end” means to stop or conclude it. It suggests that the process or activity has reached its final stage and will no longer continue.

  • For example, “The contract was brought to an end due to a breach of agreement.”
  • In a conversation about a relationship, someone might say, “We decided to bring our friendship to an end.”
  • A person discussing a long-term commitment might say, “After years of hard work, they finally brought the project to an end.”

71. Wrapped things up

This slang phrase means to bring something to a close or finish a task or project.

  • For example, “We wrapped things up and submitted the report on time.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “After everyone left, we wrapped things up by cleaning the house.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Have you wrapped things up with the client yet?”

72. Called it a day

This phrase means to decide to stop working or end an activity for the day.

  • For instance, “It’s getting late, let’s call it a day and continue tomorrow.”
  • In a discussion about a long day of work, someone might say, “I was exhausted, so I called it a day early.”
  • A friend might suggest, “We’ve been studying for hours, let’s call it a day and relax.”

73. Finalized it

This phrase means to complete or finish something, often with a sense of making a final decision or reaching a conclusion.

  • For example, “After much discussion, we finalized the budget for the project.”
  • In a conversation about a contract, someone might say, “We need to review the terms before finalizing it.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Have you finalized the presentation yet?”

74. Finished up

This phrase means to complete the remaining tasks or bring something to a close.

  • For instance, “I finished up the last few emails before leaving for the day.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Let’s finish up the remaining tasks so we can move on to the next phase.”
  • A team member might ask, “Have you finished up the report yet?”

75. Completed the task

This phrase means to finish or accomplish the assigned task.

  • For example, “I completed the task ahead of schedule.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We need to prioritize completing the task.”
  • A supervisor might ask, “Have you completed the task according to the instructions?”

76. Brought to fruition

This phrase means that a task or project has been completed successfully, usually after a lot of effort and hard work.

  • For example, “After months of planning and preparation, the team finally brought the project to fruition.”
  • A business owner might say, “Our marketing campaign was a great success. We brought our goals to fruition.”
  • A student might say, “I studied diligently and brought my grades to fruition with straight A’s.”

77. Got it done

This phrase simply means that a task or activity has been completed or finished successfully.

  • For instance, “I had a long to-do list, but I managed to get it all done.”
  • A person might say, “I had a busy day at work, but I got everything done on time.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you finish the report?” to which the response could be, “Yes, I got it done.”

78. Knocked it out

This phrase means to complete a task or project quickly and efficiently, often with great skill or determination.

  • For example, “The team worked together and knocked out the project ahead of schedule.”
  • A person might say, “I had a ton of errands to run, but I managed to knock them all out in one afternoon.”
  • Someone might say, “I had a lot of cleaning to do, but I knocked it out in a couple of hours.”

79. Wrapped it all up

This phrase means to finish or complete all tasks or activities that needed to be done.

  • For instance, “After a long day of work, I finally wrapped it all up and went home.”
  • A person might say, “I had a lot of loose ends to tie up, but I managed to wrap it all up before the deadline.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you finish the project?” and the response could be, “Yes, I wrapped it all up.”

80. Called it quits

This phrase means to decide to stop or end an activity or task, often because it is no longer productive or enjoyable.

  • For example, “After hours of arguing, they finally called it quits and ended their relationship.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working on this project for too long without any progress. I think it’s time to call it quits.”
  • Someone might say, “We played basketball for hours, but when it started raining, we called it quits and went home.”

81. Put the last piece in place

This phrase means to complete a task or project by adding the final element or doing the final step. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.

  • For example, a puzzle enthusiast might say, “I finally put the last piece in place and completed the puzzle.”
  • In a business context, a team leader might announce, “Let’s put the last piece in place and finish this project on time.”
  • A student might exclaim, “I worked all night, but I put the last piece in place and finished my essay!”

82. Brought it to a conclusion

This phrase means to bring something to an end or complete a task or project. It implies that all necessary steps or actions have been taken to reach a final outcome.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “After hours of research and analysis, I brought my presentation to a conclusion.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence presented today has brought this trial to a conclusion.”
  • A writer might declare, “I’ve revised and edited my manuscript multiple times, and I finally brought it to a conclusion.”

83. Made it through

This phrase means to successfully navigate or endure a challenging situation or task. It implies overcoming obstacles or difficulties to reach the end.

  • For example, a marathon runner might say, “I pushed through the pain and made it through the finish line.”
  • Someone who just survived a difficult exam might exclaim, “I studied all night, but I made it through!”
  • A person who successfully completed a tough work project might announce, “I faced many challenges, but I made it through and delivered the final product.”

84. Checkmark

This term is derived from the symbol ✔️ used to indicate that a task or item on a list has been completed. It is often used informally to signify that something has been finished or accomplished.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can finally put a checkmark next to that task on my to-do list!”
  • In a conversation about chores, someone might declare, “I’ve got checkmarks next to all my household tasks.”
  • A student might show their completed assignments to a teacher and say, “Checkmarks on all my homework!”

85. Done

This term is a simple and straightforward way to indicate that something has been finished or completed. It is often used in casual conversations or informal contexts.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m done with my work for today, let’s go grab dinner.”
  • In a discussion about a project, a team member might state, “I’ve done my part, now it’s time for the next phase.”
  • A chef might announce, “Dinner is done, come and get it!”

86. Finished

This term is used to indicate that something has been completed or reached its conclusion.

  • For example, “I finished my homework.”
  • A person might say, “I finished reading the book last night.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We finally finished the presentation.”

87. In the books

This phrase refers to something that is officially finished or completed and has been documented or recorded.

  • For instance, “The project is finally in the books.”
  • A person might say, “The deal is done and it’s officially in the books.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “With that win, the season is now in the books.”

88. Closed out

This term is often used to indicate that a task or project has been completed and is now closed or finished.

  • For example, “We closed out the meeting with a summary of the key points.”
  • A person might say, “I closed out the month by submitting my expense report.”
  • In a financial context, someone might say, “We closed out the year with strong sales numbers.”

89. Through

This term is used to indicate that something has been successfully finished or completed.

  • For instance, “I’m through with my work for the day.”
  • A person might say, “I’m finally through with that difficult project.”
  • In a conversation about a task, someone might say, “I just need to get through this last part.”

90. Knocked out

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been completed quickly or efficiently.

  • For example, “I knocked out that report in just an hour.”
  • A person might say, “I need to knock out these emails before lunch.”
  • In a discussion about tasks, someone might say, “I’ll knock out the easy ones first.”