Top 24 Slang For Concede – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to conceding defeat or giving in, finding the right words can sometimes be a challenge. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with a list of the most popular and trendy slang terms for “concede.” From casual conversations to heated debates, these expressions will have you confidently navigating any situation where conceding is key. So, sit back, relax, and let us guide you through the colorful world of slang for concede.

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1. Concede the match

This slang phrase is commonly used in sports or competitive activities when a player or team admits that they have lost the match or game.

  • For example, after a soccer game, a player might say, “We had to concede the match to the opposing team. They played really well.”
  • In a video game tournament, a player might announce, “I had to concede the match because I couldn’t overcome my opponent’s strategy.”
  • During a chess game, a player might say, “I realized I was in a losing position, so I decided to concede the match.”

2. Admit to being outplayed

This slang phrase is often used in competitive situations when someone accepts that their opponent has played better or has superior skills.

  • For instance, in a tennis match, a player might say, “I have to admit, my opponent outplayed me today.”
  • In a debate, someone might acknowledge, “I was outplayed by my opponent’s strong arguments.”
  • In a card game, a player might say, “I admit, my opponent had a better strategy and outplayed me.”

3. Accept defeat

This slang phrase is a straightforward way to express the act of acknowledging and accepting that one has been defeated in a competition or conflict.

  • For example, after a boxing match, a fighter might say, “I accept defeat. My opponent was stronger and faster.”
  • In a board game, a player might declare, “I accept defeat. It’s clear that my opponent has a winning strategy.”
  • In a political campaign, a candidate might publicly state, “I accept defeat and congratulate my opponent on their victory.”

4. Yield the field

This slang phrase is often used metaphorically to describe someone conceding or giving up their position, advantage, or argument in a competition or debate.

  • For instance, during a business negotiation, someone might say, “I realized I couldn’t win the argument, so I decided to yield the field.”
  • In a sports game, a team might choose to “yield the field” when they recognize that their opponents have a better chance of winning.
  • In a political campaign, a candidate might announce, “I have decided to yield the field and support my party’s nominee.”

5. Bow to the victor

This slang phrase is a figurative expression used to convey the act of showing respect and submission to the person or team who has emerged as the winner in a competition or conflict.

  • For example, after a martial arts match, a defeated fighter might bow to the victor as a sign of respect.
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I bow to the victor. Your arguments were compelling and well-reasoned.”
  • In a game of chess, a player might bow to the victor as a gesture of sportsmanship and acknowledgement of their opponent’s skill.
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6. Give the game away

This phrase is used when someone unintentionally reveals information or secrets that could affect the outcome of a situation or game.

  • For example, “He gave the game away by accidentally mentioning the surprise party.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “Don’t give the game away by acting suspicious.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The player’s mistake gave the game away and cost their team the victory.”

7. Admit to being overpowered

This phrase is used when someone acknowledges that they are unable to compete or succeed against a stronger opponent or force.

  • For instance, “He had to admit to being overpowered by the opponent’s skills.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I had to concede and admit to being overpowered by the boss.”
  • A person discussing a difficult challenge might say, “Sometimes you just have to give up and admit to being overpowered.”

8. Concede the point

This phrase is used when someone acknowledges that their opponent has made a valid or convincing argument.

  • For example, “After considering the evidence, she had to concede the point.”
  • In a debate, a participant might say, “I have to concede the point that my opponent made a strong argument.”
  • A person discussing a disagreement might say, “In the end, I had to concede the point and accept that I was wrong.”

9. Give ground

This phrase is used when someone surrenders or yields to their opponent in a conflict or argument.

  • For instance, “He decided to give ground and compromise on the issue.”
  • In a negotiation, a person might say, “I’m willing to give ground on some points to reach a mutually beneficial agreement.”
  • A team captain might say, “We can’t afford to give ground to the opposing team. We need to stand our ground.”

10. Fold like a cheap suit

This phrase is used when someone quickly gives up or surrenders without putting up a fight or resistance.

  • For example, “He folded like a cheap suit as soon as he faced a challenge.”
  • In a poker game, a player might say, “He had a weak hand and folded like a cheap suit.”
  • A person discussing someone’s lack of determination might say, “He always folds like a cheap suit whenever things get tough.”

11. Raise the red flag

To admit that you are unable to continue or succeed in a certain situation. The phrase “raise the red flag” is often used metaphorically to indicate surrender or conceding defeat.

  • For example, in a sports competition, a team might “raise the red flag” when they realize they cannot win.
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I have to raise the red flag and admit that my opponent’s argument is stronger.”
  • A person struggling with a difficult task might say, “I’ve been trying for hours, but I think it’s time to raise the red flag and ask for help.”

12. Admit to being outmatched

To acknowledge that you are facing an opponent or situation that is stronger or more skilled than you. It implies accepting that you are at a disadvantage and cannot win or succeed.

  • For instance, in a game of chess, a player might admit to being outmatched when their opponent has a clear advantage.
  • In a competition, someone might say, “I have to admit, my opponent is just too good. I’m outmatched.”
  • A person facing a difficult challenge might realize, “I’ve been outmatched from the start. It’s time to find a different approach.”

13. Accept the inevitable

To come to terms with something that is certain to happen and cannot be changed or avoided. It involves acknowledging that there is no way to alter the outcome and resigning oneself to the situation.

  • For example, in a losing battle, a soldier might accept the inevitable and prepare for the worst.
  • In a difficult situation, someone might say, “I can’t change what’s going to happen. I just have to accept the inevitable.”
  • A person facing a difficult decision might realize, “No matter what I choose, there will be consequences. It’s time to accept the inevitable.”

14. Wave the red flag

To give up or concede defeat. The phrase “wave the red flag” is often used metaphorically to indicate surrendering or admitting that you cannot continue or succeed in a certain situation.

  • For instance, in a competition, a team might “wave the red flag” when they realize they have no chance of winning.
  • In a disagreement, someone might say, “I don’t want to argue anymore. Let’s just wave the red flag and move on.”
  • A person facing overwhelming odds might decide, “It’s time to wave the red flag and find a different path.”

15. Cede the field

To give up control or surrender a position. The phrase “cede the field” is often used metaphorically to indicate conceding defeat or stepping aside to allow someone else to take over.

  • For example, in a political campaign, a candidate might cede the field to their opponent if they realize they cannot win.
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I can see that my argument is not convincing. I’ll cede the field to my opponent.”
  • A person leading a project might decide, “It’s time to cede the field to someone with fresh ideas and new energy.”

16. Concede the game

This phrase is used when a person admits that they have lost a game or competition.

  • For example, “After a long and intense match, he finally conceded the game.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I had to concede the game because of an injury.”
  • During a friendly game, someone might jokingly say, “I’m not conceding the game, I’m just giving you a chance to catch up.”

17. Admit to being outwitted

This phrase is used when a person admits that someone else has outsmarted them or has been more clever.

  • For instance, “I have to admit, he really outwitted me with that move.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I concede that you made a valid point.”
  • During a friendly argument, a person might jokingly say, “Fine, you win, you outwitted me this time.”

18. Acknowledge the other’s superiority

This phrase is used when a person acknowledges that someone else is superior or has more skill in a certain area.

  • For example, “I have to acknowledge his superiority in playing the guitar.”
  • In a competition, a participant might say, “I concede that she is the better athlete.”
  • During a friendly challenge, someone might say, “Okay, I acknowledge your superiority in chess.”

19. Give up the fight

This phrase is used when a person decides to surrender or stop resisting in a conflict or argument.

  • For instance, “After hours of arguing, he finally gave up the fight.”
  • In a political debate, someone might say, “I concede defeat and will support the other candidate.”
  • During a heated discussion, a person might say, “Let’s just give up the fight and find a compromise.”

20. Admit to being beaten

This phrase is used when a person admits that someone else has defeated them in a competition or conflict.

  • For example, “I have to admit, he really beat me fair and square.”
  • In a sports match, a player might say, “I concede that he is the better player.”
  • During a game, someone might say, “Okay, you win, you’ve beaten me this time.”

21. Concede victory

This phrase is used to describe the act of accepting that you have lost a competition or battle. It signifies acknowledging the superiority of the opposing side.

  • For example, in a sports match, a team might concede victory when it becomes clear that they have no chance of winning.
  • In a political debate, a candidate might concede victory to their opponent if it becomes evident that they have lost the support of the majority.
  • A person might say, “I hate to admit it, but I have to concede victory to my opponent. They were just too strong.”

22. Surrender the match

This phrase is used to describe the act of relinquishing control or conceding defeat in a match or competition. It implies accepting that you cannot win and choosing to end the contest.

  • For instance, in a chess game, a player might surrender the match when they realize that their position is untenable.
  • In a video game, a player might surrender the match if they believe that their chances of winning are slim.
  • A person might say, “I surrender the match. There’s no point in continuing when I’m so far behind.”

23. Yield

This term is used to describe the act of giving up or conceding to someone or something. It implies accepting that the opposing side is stronger or has greater authority.

  • For example, in a legal dispute, one party might yield to the other if they realize that their case is weak.
  • In a negotiation, a person might yield to the demands of the other party in order to reach a compromise.
  • A person might say, “I have no choice but to yield. It’s clear that I can’t win this argument.”

24. Pack it in

This phrase is used to convey the idea of giving up or stopping an activity. It implies that the person has decided to abandon their efforts and accept defeat or failure.

  • For instance, in a marathon, a runner might pack it in if they are unable to continue due to exhaustion.
  • In a game of poker, a player might pack it in if they believe that their chances of winning are minimal.
  • A person might say, “I’ve had enough. It’s time to pack it in and move on to something else.”