Top 33 Slang For Think About – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing your thoughts and ponderings, sometimes regular words just won’t cut it. “Think About” slang adds a touch of flair and creativity to your conversations. Let us guide you through a list of trendy and fun expressions that will take your communication game to the next level. So, why stick to the ordinary when you can spice things up with some fresh new phrases? Let’s dive in and explore the exciting world of “Think About” slang!

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1. Chew on

This phrase means to carefully think about or consider something. It implies taking the time to fully understand or analyze a situation or idea.

  • For example, “I need to chew on this decision before I make up my mind.”
  • Someone might say, “That’s an interesting point. I’ll have to chew on it for a bit.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, a person might suggest, “Let’s chew on this issue and reconvene tomorrow with our thoughts.”

2. Mull over

To “mull over” something means to think about it deeply or to consider it carefully. It suggests taking the time to weigh the pros and cons or to reflect on different possibilities.

  • For instance, “I need some time to mull over whether I should take the job.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been mulling over your suggestion, and I think it’s worth exploring.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, someone might advise, “Take your time to mull it over before you make a choice.”

3. Ponder

To “ponder” means to think deeply or to consider something carefully. It implies reflecting on a topic or idea, often with a sense of curiosity or contemplation.

  • For example, “I like to sit by the lake and ponder the mysteries of the universe.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been pondering the meaning of life lately.”
  • In a discussion about a philosophical question, someone might ask, “I wonder if anyone has ever pondered this before.”

4. Contemplate

To “contemplate” means to think about or consider something deeply and at length. It suggests a deliberate and focused mental activity, often involving introspection or reflection.

  • For instance, “I like to contemplate the beauty of nature when I’m feeling stressed.”
  • A person might say, “I need some time to contemplate my options before making a decision.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might suggest, “It’s important to take time to contemplate your values and goals.”

5. Reflect on

To “reflect on” something means to think about it deeply or to ponder it. It suggests a thoughtful and introspective consideration of a topic, often with the aim of gaining insight or understanding.

  • For example, “I like to reflect on my day before going to sleep.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been reflecting on our conversation, and I think I understand your perspective now.”
  • In a discussion about a past experience, someone might share, “I often reflect on that time in my life and how it shaped me.”

6. Ruminate

To think deeply or carefully about something, often for an extended period of time. “Ruminate” implies a process of reflection and contemplation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need some time to ruminate on this decision before I make up my mind.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might advise, “Take time to ruminate on your past experiences and learn from them.”
  • A writer might say, “I often ruminate on ideas for my next novel before I start writing.”

7. Consider

To think about or give thought to something. “Consider” suggests a deliberate process of evaluation or examination.

  • For instance, if someone asks for your opinion, you might say, “I will consider your request and get back to you.”
  • In a debate, a participant might argue, “We should consider the long-term consequences of this decision.”
  • A person might say, “Before making a purchase, I always consider the quality and price of the product.”

8. Deliberate

To carefully consider or think about something before making a decision. “Deliberate” implies a purposeful and thorough examination of options or choices.

  • For example, when discussing a complex issue, someone might say, “We need to deliberate on this matter before reaching a conclusion.”
  • In a courtroom, a jury might deliberate on a verdict after hearing all the evidence.
  • A person might say, “I like to deliberate on major decisions to ensure I have considered all possible outcomes.”

9. Meditate

To engage in deep thought or contemplation, often with a focus on mindfulness or self-awareness. “Meditate” suggests a practice of quieting the mind and finding inner peace.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I meditate every morning to start my day with a clear mind.”
  • In a discussion about stress relief, someone might suggest, “Try meditating for a few minutes each day to calm your mind.”
  • A person might say, “Meditation helps me reflect on my emotions and gain perspective.”

10. Brainstorm

To generate a large number of ideas or solutions to a problem through a group or individual effort. “Brainstorm” implies a creative and collaborative process of thinking and generating new concepts.

  • For example, in a business meeting, participants might brainstorm ideas for a new marketing campaign.
  • In a design project, a team might brainstorm different concepts and approaches.
  • A person might say, “I like to brainstorm ideas before starting a writing project to get my creativity flowing.”

11. Evaluate

To carefully consider and assess the value or significance of something or someone. It involves analyzing and weighing different factors to form an opinion or make a decision.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I will evaluate your performance based on your understanding of the material.”
  • In a business context, a manager might evaluate the performance of employees to determine promotions or bonuses.
  • A product reviewer might evaluate a new gadget based on its features, usability, and value for money.
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12. Analyze

To examine or study something in detail to understand its nature, structure, or components. It involves breaking down complex ideas or situations into smaller parts for better comprehension.

  • For instance, a scientist might analyze data collected from an experiment to draw conclusions.
  • A literary critic might analyze a novel to understand its themes, symbolism, and narrative techniques.
  • In a sports context, a coach might analyze game footage to identify strengths and weaknesses of the team.

13. Assess

To evaluate or estimate the nature, quality, or importance of something or someone. It involves making a judgment or determination based on careful consideration of various factors.

  • For example, a doctor might assess a patient’s symptoms to diagnose an illness.
  • A financial advisor might assess a client’s financial situation to provide investment recommendations.
  • In a performance review, a manager might assess an employee’s skills, strengths, and areas for improvement.

14. Brood

To think deeply and at length about something, often in a gloomy or troubled manner. It implies a state of deep contemplation or dwelling on negative thoughts or emotions.

  • For instance, someone might brood over a past mistake and constantly replay it in their mind.
  • A character in a book might brood over a difficult decision or a tragic event.
  • In a conversation, a friend might say, “Don’t brood over what happened. Focus on the present and future.”

15. Dwell on

To think or talk about something at length or repeatedly, often to the point of obsession or excessive focus. It implies being preoccupied with a particular thought or idea.

  • For example, a person might dwell on a negative comment and keep replaying it in their mind.
  • In a relationship, someone might dwell on past mistakes and hold grudges.
  • A therapist might encourage a client to stop dwelling on negative thoughts and focus on positive aspects of life.

16. Chew the fat

This slang phrase is used to describe having a relaxed and informal conversation with someone. It often involves discussing various topics without any particular purpose or agenda.

  • For example, “We sat on the porch and chewed the fat for hours.”
  • Two friends might say, “Let’s grab a coffee and chew the fat.”
  • During a family gathering, someone might suggest, “Let’s all sit around the table and chew the fat.”

17. Turn over in one’s mind

This phrase is used to express the act of thinking about something extensively or thoroughly. It implies a process of introspection or reflection.

  • For instance, “I need some time to turn over the offer in my mind.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been turning this problem over in my mind for days.”
  • When faced with a difficult decision, someone might advise, “Take your time and turn it over in your mind before making a choice.”

18. Give some thought to

This phrase is used to suggest the act of thinking about something with intention or purpose. It implies a level of seriousness or importance in the matter being considered.

  • For example, “I’ll give some thought to your proposal and get back to you.”
  • When discussing a potential plan, someone might say, “We should give some thought to the logistics.”
  • A person might advise, “Before making a decision, it’s important to give some thought to the potential consequences.”

19. Mull things over

This phrase is used to describe the act of thinking about something carefully or deeply. It often implies a process of deliberation or contemplation.

  • For instance, “I need some time to mull things over before giving you an answer.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been mulling over the options for a while now.”
  • When faced with a difficult situation, someone might suggest, “Take a step back and mull things over before taking any action.”

20. Turn around in one’s mind

This phrase is used to express the act of thinking about something from different angles or perspectives. It implies a process of mental examination or analysis.

  • For example, “I’ve been turning this idea around in my mind for a while.”
  • A person might say, “I need some time to turn this problem around in my mind.”
  • When discussing a complex issue, someone might suggest, “Let’s turn it around in our minds and see if we can find a solution.”

21. Pore over

To pore over something means to carefully examine or study it in great detail.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to pore over my notes before the exam.”
  • A researcher might say, “I spent hours poring over the data to find any patterns.”
  • Someone analyzing a contract might say, “I have to pore over the fine print to make sure there are no hidden clauses.”

22. Wrestle with

To wrestle with something means to struggle or grapple with it, often in a metaphorical sense.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m wrestling with a difficult decision.”
  • A person dealing with conflicting emotions might say, “I’m wrestling with my feelings about the situation.”
  • Someone trying to solve a complex problem might say, “I’ve been wrestling with this puzzle for hours.”

23. Meditate on

To meditate on something means to deeply reflect or think about it, often in a calm and focused manner.

  • For example, a person might say, “I like to meditate on the meaning of life.”
  • A writer might say, “I need to meditate on these ideas before I can start writing.”
  • Someone contemplating a decision might say, “I need some quiet time to meditate on my options.”

24. Cogitate

To cogitate means to think deeply or carefully about something.

  • For instance, a philosopher might say, “I spend hours cogitating on the nature of existence.”
  • A person trying to solve a difficult problem might say, “I need some time to cogitate on this.”
  • Someone reflecting on a past event might say, “I often find myself cogitating on what could have been.”

25. Brood over

To brood over something means to think about it excessively or in a negative way.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t help but brood over my past mistakes.”
  • Someone feeling down might say, “I tend to brood over things when I’m feeling sad.”
  • A person worrying about the future might say, “I find myself brooding over what might happen.”

26. Muse on

To think deeply or ponder about something. “Muse on” is a phrase used to describe the act of contemplating or considering a particular topic or idea.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some time to muse on this decision before I make up my mind.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, one might suggest, “Let’s take a moment to muse on the different perspectives involved.”
  • A person might advise, “When faced with a difficult situation, it’s helpful to muse on the potential outcomes before taking action.”

27. Chew the cud

This phrase is a metaphorical expression that means to think deeply or carefully about something. It implies the act of mentally chewing on an idea or concept, similar to how a cow chews its cud.

  • For instance, a teacher might encourage students by saying, “Take some time to chew the cud before answering the question.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might suggest, “It’s important to regularly chew the cud and reflect on our actions.”
  • A friend might say, “I need to chew the cud before I decide whether to pursue this opportunity.”

28. Turn over

To think about or give thought to something. The phrase “turn over” suggests the act of mentally flipping or examining a topic or idea.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I’ll need to turn over this proposal before making a decision.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might suggest, “Let’s turn it over and see if we can find a solution.”
  • A person might advise, “When faced with a difficult choice, it’s important to turn it over in your mind and weigh the pros and cons.”

29. Take into consideration

To include or think about something when making a decision or forming an opinion. The phrase “take into consideration” emphasizes the act of considering all relevant factors or aspects.

  • For instance, a judge might say, “I will take your circumstances into consideration when sentencing you.”
  • In a discussion about a potential solution, someone might suggest, “We need to take the cost into consideration before implementing it.”
  • A friend might advise, “When choosing a college, make sure to take location and program offerings into consideration.”

30. Give it some brainpower

To actively engage one’s mental faculties and think about something. The phrase “give it some brainpower” suggests the act of applying one’s intelligence or mental capacity to a particular problem or situation.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “This math problem requires some brainpower. Take your time.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, someone might suggest, “Let’s give it some brainpower and come up with a solution.”
  • A parent might encourage their child by saying, “You can do it! Just give it some brainpower and think it through.”

31. Dream up

To dream up means to imagine or create something in your mind. It is often used when coming up with new ideas or solutions.

  • For example, “Let’s dream up some innovative marketing strategies for the new product.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “I need everyone to dream up some out-of-the-box ideas.”
  • A writer might say, “I always have to dream up interesting plot twists for my stories.”

32. Conceive

To conceive means to formulate or develop an idea or plan in your mind. It is often used when discussing the initial stages of thinking about something.

  • For instance, “He conceived the idea for a revolutionary new product.”
  • A project manager might say, “We need to conceive a detailed plan for this project.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The experiment was conceived to test a hypothesis.”

33. Plan

To plan means to arrange or prepare something in advance. While it is a more general term, it can also be used as slang for thinking about something in a strategic way.

  • For example, “We need to plan our next move carefully.”
  • When discussing a vacation, someone might say, “Let’s plan a trip to Europe.”
  • A student might say, “I need to plan my study schedule for the upcoming exams.”