Top 58 Slang For Consider – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to keeping up with the latest slang and trends, we’ve got you covered. Our team at Fluentslang has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a list of the most intriguing and noteworthy slang words that you should consider adding to your vocabulary. Get ready to impress your friends and stay ahead of the curve with this comprehensive compilation of the hottest slang for consider.

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1. Ponder

To think about something deeply or carefully. It implies a sense of reflection or contemplation on a particular topic or issue.

  • For example, “I need some time to ponder my options before making a decision.”
  • A person might say, “I often ponder the meaning of life when I’m out in nature.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might ask, “Have you ever pondered the concept of free will?”

2. Contemplate

To consider or think about something carefully and at length. It suggests a deliberate and thoughtful examination of a subject or idea.

  • For instance, “I need some time to contemplate whether or not to take the job offer.”
  • A person might say, “I often contemplate the mysteries of the universe when I stargaze.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might advise, “Take time to contemplate your goals and aspirations.”

3. Mull over

To think about or consider something deeply and for an extended period of time. It implies a process of careful deliberation and examination of a particular matter.

  • For example, “I need some time to mull over the pros and cons before making a decision.”
  • A person might say, “I often mull over my mistakes and learn from them.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging problem, someone might suggest, “Take some time to mull it over and come back with fresh ideas.”

4. Reflect on

To think deeply or consider something carefully. It suggests a process of introspection and examination of one’s thoughts, feelings, or experiences.

  • For instance, “I like to reflect on my day before going to bed.”
  • A person might say, “I often reflect on past relationships and what I’ve learned from them.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might advise, “Take time to reflect on your actions and how they align with your values.”

5. Chew on

To think about or consider something, often in a more casual or lighthearted manner. It implies a process of mentally mulling over a particular topic or idea.

  • For example, “I’ll have to chew on that before I can give you an answer.”
  • A person might say, “I like to chew on different perspectives before forming my own opinion.”
  • In a conversation about a complex problem, someone might suggest, “Let’s chew on it for a bit and reconvene later.”

6. Deliberate

To think or consider something carefully and intentionally. It implies a conscious decision-making process.

  • For example, “Let’s deliberate on this matter before making a final decision.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “We need to deliberate the pros and cons of each option.”
  • When considering a difficult choice, a person might ask, “I need some time to deliberate on this before giving you an answer.”

7. Weigh

To carefully consider or evaluate different options or factors before making a decision. It implies a process of comparing and assessing the relative importance or value of different aspects.

  • For instance, “We need to weigh the benefits and risks before proceeding.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “Let’s weigh the evidence before jumping to conclusions.”
  • When considering a job offer, a person might say, “I’m weighing my options before making a decision.”

8. Assess

To evaluate or analyze something in order to understand its value, quality, or importance. It often involves making judgments or forming opinions based on careful examination.

  • For example, “We need to assess the impact of this policy change.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might say, “I need to assess your strengths and areas for improvement.”
  • When evaluating a research paper, a professor might comment, “I will assess the validity of your arguments.”

9. Examine

To inspect or scrutinize something closely in order to understand its nature, condition, or quality. It involves a thorough and detailed investigation.

  • For instance, “We need to examine the evidence before drawing any conclusions.”
  • In a medical examination, a doctor might say, “I need to examine your symptoms to make a diagnosis.”
  • When analyzing a piece of art, a critic might comment, “Let’s examine the brushstrokes and composition.”

10. Review

To look over or evaluate something in order to assess its quality, performance, or suitability. It often involves a critical assessment or analysis.

  • For example, “Let’s review the proposal before presenting it.”
  • In a product review, a customer might say, “I will review the features and performance of this smartphone.”
  • When studying for an exam, a student might say, “I need to review the material to ensure I understand it.”

11. Ponder over

This phrase means to carefully consider or contemplate something. It implies a deeper level of thought and reflection.

  • For example, “I need to ponder over whether to accept the job offer.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, someone might say, “Take some time to ponder over your options.”
  • A person reflecting on a personal problem might say, “I spent hours pondering over what went wrong.”

12. Take into account

This phrase means to include or consider something as part of a decision or judgment. It implies that the information or factor being taken into account is important or relevant.

  • For instance, “When planning a trip, you need to take into account the weather.”
  • In a discussion about a business strategy, someone might say, “We must take customer feedback into account.”
  • A person discussing a legal case might argue, “The judge should take the defendant’s mental health into account.”

13. Give thought to

This phrase means to consider or contemplate something. It implies actively engaging in the process of thinking and reflecting on a particular matter.

  • For example, “I need to give thought to my career options.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might say, “Have you given thought to possible solutions?”
  • A person reflecting on a personal decision might say, “I’ve been giving a lot of thought to whether I should move.”

14. Give consideration to

This phrase means to think about or take into account when making a decision. It suggests that the idea or factor being considered is important and worthy of attention.

  • For instance, “We should give consideration to the impact on the environment.”
  • In a discussion about a policy change, someone might say, “The government needs to give consideration to the needs of the citizens.”
  • A person discussing a job offer might say, “I’m giving serious consideration to the benefits and salary.”

15. Give weight to

This phrase means to attach importance or significance to something when making a decision or judgment. It suggests that the idea or factor being given weight is influential or impactful.

  • For example, “We need to give weight to the opinions of experts.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I give more weight to scientific evidence than personal anecdotes.”
  • A person discussing a candidate for a job might argue, “We should give weight to their relevant experience and qualifications.”

16. Give attention to

To give consideration or focus to something or someone. It implies actively engaging with the subject or person.

  • For example, “You should give attention to the details in this report.”
  • In a conversation about a new project, someone might say, “Let’s give attention to the timeline and make sure we stay on track.”
  • A teacher might advise students, “Give attention to the instructions before starting the assignment.”

17. Give regard to

To consider or take into consideration. It suggests acknowledging the importance or relevance of something.

  • For instance, “You should give regard to the feedback from your customers.”
  • In a discussion about making a decision, someone might say, “We need to give regard to the potential risks involved.”
  • A manager might instruct their team, “When planning the project, give regard to the budget constraints.”

18. Give contemplation to

To think about or reflect on something deeply. It implies a level of introspection and thoughtfulness.

  • For example, “Take some time to give contemplation to your career goals.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, someone might say, “I need to give contemplation to all the possible outcomes.”
  • A person might advise their friend, “Before making a big life change, give contemplation to how it will affect your future.”

19. Give reflection to

To give careful thought or consideration to something. It suggests thinking about different aspects or perspectives.

  • For instance, “Take a moment to give reflection to the impact of your words.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “We should give reflection to different viewpoints before forming our opinions.”
  • A teacher might prompt their students, “When writing your essay, give reflection to the opposing arguments as well.”

20. Give examination to

To thoroughly analyze or investigate something. It implies a detailed and critical examination.

  • For example, “We need to give examination to the data before drawing any conclusions.”
  • In a conversation about a potential investment, someone might say, “Make sure to give examination to the company’s financial statements.”
  • A scientist might explain, “To understand the phenomenon, we must give examination to its underlying mechanisms.”

21. Give scrutiny to

When you give scrutiny to something, you carefully examine or analyze it in order to understand it better or find any flaws or issues.

  • For example, “Before making a decision, it’s important to give scrutiny to all the available options.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Let’s give scrutiny to both sides of the argument before forming an opinion.”
  • A manager might ask their team to “give scrutiny to the budget and identify any areas for cost-saving.”
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22. Give deliberation to

When you give deliberation to something, you take the time to think about it deeply and consider all aspects before making a decision or forming an opinion.

  • For instance, “Before accepting the job offer, I need to give deliberation to the salary and benefits.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s give deliberation to each proposal before voting on the best course of action.”
  • A student preparing for a test might say, “I need to give deliberation to each question and not rush through the exam.”

23. Give evaluation to

When you give evaluation to something, you assess or judge its quality, value, or performance. It involves analyzing and forming an opinion about the subject.

  • For example, “The teacher will give evaluation to the students’ essays based on grammar, content, and organization.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “We need to give evaluation to our current marketing strategy and identify areas for improvement.”
  • A food critic might give evaluation to a restaurant’s dishes based on taste, presentation, and creativity.

24. Give analysis to

When you give analysis to something, you examine or study it in detail to understand its components, structure, or meaning. It involves breaking down the subject and drawing conclusions based on the findings.

  • For instance, “In order to solve the problem, we need to give analysis to the data and identify patterns.”
  • In a scientific study, researchers might give analysis to the collected data to draw conclusions and make recommendations.
  • A literary critic might give analysis to a novel’s themes, characters, and symbolism to interpret its deeper meaning.

25. Give assessment to

When you give assessment to something, you evaluate or judge its quality, performance, or effectiveness. It involves determining its strengths, weaknesses, and overall value.

  • For example, “The coach will give assessment to each player’s skills during the tryouts.”
  • In a performance review, a supervisor might give assessment to an employee’s job performance and provide feedback.
  • A teacher might give assessment to a student’s essay based on grammar, content, and critical thinking skills.

26. Evaluate

To carefully examine and judge something to determine its value, importance, or quality. “Evaluate” is often used in a professional or academic context.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please evaluate this essay based on the provided rubric.”
  • A product reviewer might write, “I will evaluate the new smartphone based on its design, performance, and camera quality.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might suggest, “Let’s evaluate the potential risks and benefits of this new investment opportunity.”

27. Analyze

To examine something in detail to understand its components, structure, or function. “Analyze” often involves a systematic approach to studying or investigating a subject.

  • For instance, a scientist might analyze data from an experiment to draw conclusions.
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Let’s analyze the opponent’s strategies to develop a game plan.”
  • A financial advisor might analyze a client’s budget and spending habits to provide recommendations for improvement.

28. Study

To engage in a focused and systematic examination of a subject to gain knowledge or understanding. “Study” implies a dedicated effort to learn and acquire information.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to study for my upcoming exam.”
  • A researcher might study the effects of a new drug on a specific population.
  • In a conversation about language learning, someone might mention, “I’ve been studying French for two years now.”

29. Scrutinize

To examine or observe something with great attention to detail and critical analysis. “Scrutinize” often implies a thorough and meticulous examination.

  • For instance, a detective might scrutinize a crime scene for evidence.
  • In a job interview, an employer might scrutinize a candidate’s resume and qualifications.
  • A book critic might scrutinize the plot, characters, and writing style of a novel.

30. Explore

To investigate or examine something in order to gain a deeper understanding or discover new information. “Explore” often implies a sense of curiosity and discovery.

  • For example, a scientist might explore the effects of climate change on a particular ecosystem.
  • A traveler might explore a new city to learn about its culture and history.
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might say, “Let’s explore the concept of identity and its impact on personal development.”

31. Investigate

To conduct a thorough examination or inquiry into something. “Investigate” is often used to suggest a deeper level of scrutiny or research.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to investigate this crime scene for any potential evidence.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might ask, “Have you investigated both sides of the argument?”
  • A journalist might write, “The reporter spent months investigating the corruption scandal.”

32. Question

To have doubts or uncertainties about something. “Question” implies a desire for further clarification or a need for more information.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I question the validity of this study’s findings.”
  • In a debate, someone might challenge an opponent’s argument by saying, “I have serious questions about your proposed solution.”
  • A person might reflect, “Sometimes, it’s healthy to question your own beliefs and values.”

33. Regard

To think about or take into account. “Regard” suggests giving careful thought or consideration to something.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please regard the due date for this assignment.”
  • In a discussion about a potential job offer, someone might advise, “Take into regard the company’s culture and values.”
  • A person might reflect, “In regard to your question, I think it’s important to consider the long-term consequences.”

34. Factor in

To consider or include as an important element or variable in a decision or situation. “Factor in” implies recognizing the significance or impact of something.

  • For instance, a financial advisor might say, “You need to factor in your monthly expenses before making a big purchase.”
  • In a discussion about planning a vacation, someone might suggest, “We should factor in the cost of accommodation and transportation.”
  • A person might advise, “Before making a decision, don’t forget to factor in the potential risks and rewards.”

35. Bear in mind

To remember or consider something, especially when making a decision or forming an opinion. “Bear in mind” suggests holding a particular piece of information or perspective in one’s thoughts.

  • For example, a manager might say, “When evaluating job candidates, bear in mind their previous experience.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might remind others, “Bear in mind that people have different cultural backgrounds and beliefs.”
  • A person might reflect, “When giving feedback, it’s important to bear in mind the impact of your words on others.”

36. Wrestle with

This slang phrase means to struggle or grapple with a difficult decision or problem. It implies a sense of inner conflict or uncertainty.

  • For example, “I’ve been wrestling with whether or not to quit my job and pursue my passion.”
  • In a discussion about life choices, someone might say, “I’m wrestling with the idea of moving to a new city.”
  • A person reflecting on a past mistake might admit, “I’ve been wrestling with guilt and regret over what I did.”

37. Brood over

To brood over something means to dwell on it excessively, often with a negative or gloomy mindset. It implies a sense of deep contemplation or worry.

  • For instance, “He tends to brood over his failures and setbacks.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I can’t help but brood over what went wrong.”
  • A person reflecting on a missed opportunity might admit, “I’ve been brooding over what could have been.”

38. Ruminate

To ruminate means to think deeply or reflect on something. It suggests a deliberate and thoughtful examination of a topic or situation.

  • For example, “I like to take long walks to ruminate on my ideas.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I often ruminate on my past mistakes to learn from them.”
  • A person reflecting on a difficult decision might admit, “I’ve been ruminating on the pros and cons for weeks.”

39. Dwell on

To dwell on something means to think about it at length or to focus on it excessively. It implies a sense of preoccupation or inability to let go.

  • For instance, “She tends to dwell on negative comments and criticism.”
  • In a conversation about the past, someone might say, “I try not to dwell on my regrets, but it’s hard.”
  • A person reflecting on a traumatic event might admit, “I’ve been dwelling on it and can’t seem to move forward.”

40. Turn over in one’s mind

To turn something over in one’s mind means to think about it carefully and consider different aspects or possibilities. It suggests a process of mental deliberation or examination.

  • For example, “I need some time to turn over the offer in my mind before making a decision.”
  • In a discussion about options, someone might say, “I’ve been turning over different ideas in my mind.”
  • A person reflecting on a complex problem might admit, “I’ve been turning it over in my mind, trying to find a solution.”

41. Take under advisement

This phrase means to carefully consider or think about something before making a decision. It implies that the suggestion or advice given is valuable and should be given proper consideration.

  • For example, “I will take your proposal under advisement and get back to you with a decision.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s take these suggestions under advisement and reconvene next week.”
  • A manager might tell an employee, “I appreciate your input. I’ll take it under advisement and discuss it with the team.”

42. Give something a think

This slang phrase means to think about something or consider it carefully. It implies that the person should take some time to reflect on the matter.

  • For instance, “I’ll give your suggestion a think and let you know my thoughts.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “That’s an interesting idea. I’ll have to give it a think.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give my situation a think? I could use your perspective.”

43. Give something a once-over

This phrase means to quickly look at or consider something. It implies that the person should give it a brief examination or evaluation.

  • For example, “I’ll give this report a once-over before submitting it.”
  • When reviewing a document, someone might say, “Let me give it a once-over to check for any errors.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Make sure to give your homework a once-over before turning it in.”

44. Give something a go

This slang phrase means to try or attempt something. It implies that the person should give it a chance or make an effort.

  • For instance, “I’ve never played tennis before, but I’ll give it a go.”
  • When faced with a new challenge, someone might say, “I’m not sure if I can do it, but I’ll give it a go.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Why not give skydiving a go? It’s an exhilarating experience.”

45. Give something a shot

This phrase means to try or attempt something. It implies that the person should give it a chance or make an effort.

  • For example, “I’ve never cooked this recipe before, but I’ll give it a shot.”
  • When presented with a new opportunity, someone might say, “I’m not sure if I’ll succeed, but I’ll give it a shot.”
  • A coach might encourage an athlete, “Don’t be afraid to give it a shot. You might surprise yourself.”

46. Give something a whirl

This phrase means to give something a try or attempt something. It implies that the person is willing to give it a chance and see how it goes.

  • For example, “I’ve never tried sushi before, but I’ll give it a whirl.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m not sure if I’ll like this book, but I’ll give it a whirl and see.”
  • A person might suggest, “Why don’t you give yoga a whirl? It might help you relax.”

47. Give something a chance

This phrase means to give something an opportunity or a fair try. It suggests being open-minded and willing to consider something.

  • For instance, “I know you don’t usually like horror movies, but give this one a chance.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not sure if I’ll enjoy this new restaurant, but I’ll give it a chance.”
  • Someone might advise, “Before you dismiss it, give online dating a chance. You never know who you might meet.”

48. Give something a look-see

This phrase means to take a look at something or examine it. It implies a quick inspection or evaluation of something.

  • For example, “I heard there’s a new art exhibit at the museum. Let’s go give it a look-see.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not sure if this shirt will fit you, but give it a look-see in the dressing room.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Before you make a decision, give the product a look-see and read some reviews.”

49. Give something a gander

This phrase means to take a look at something or observe it. It implies a casual or quick glance at something.

  • For instance, “I just got a new car. Come outside and give it a gander.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not sure if this document is what you’re looking for, but give it a gander.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Before you make up your mind, give the proposal a gander and see if it interests you.”

50. Give something a thought

This phrase means to consider or think about something. It suggests taking a moment to reflect on or ponder a particular idea or suggestion.

  • For example, “I know you’re busy, but give this idea a thought. It might be worth considering.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not sure if I’ll be able to attend the party, but I’ll give it a thought.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Before you make a decision, give the options a thought and weigh the pros and cons.”

51. Give something a ponder

This phrase means to consider or think about something carefully or deeply. It implies taking the time to reflect on a particular matter.

  • For example, “I’ll give your proposal a ponder and get back to you.”
  • A friend might say, “Before you make a decision, give it a ponder.”
  • In a conversation about life choices, someone might advise, “Take a moment to give it a ponder before committing.”

52. Give something a mull

To “give something a mull” means to consider or think about it. It suggests taking the time to ponder and evaluate a certain idea or situation.

  • For instance, “I’ll give your suggestion a mull and let you know my thoughts.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s give this idea a mull and see if it has potential.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Have you given the project a mull? What are your initial impressions?”

53. Ponder upon

This phrase means to think deeply or carefully about something. It suggests taking the time to consider a particular topic or issue.

  • For example, “I need some quiet time to ponder upon my future.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might say, “Let’s ponder upon the meaning of life.”
  • A mentor might advise, “When facing a tough decision, take a moment to ponder upon the consequences.”

54. Look into

To “look into” something means to investigate or consider it. It implies taking the time to gather information or examine a specific matter.

  • For instance, “I’ll look into the matter and provide you with an update.”
  • In a discussion about a potential investment, someone might say, “Let’s look into the company’s financials before making a decision.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to look into the suspect’s alibi to verify their whereabouts.”

55. Give heed to

To “give heed to” something means to pay attention to or consider it. It implies taking the time to give careful consideration or thought to a particular matter.

  • For example, “You should give heed to their advice; they have experience in this area.”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might say, “Give heed to the instructions before starting the exam.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Give heed to your surroundings and stay safe.”

56. Give due consideration to

To carefully think about or consider something before making a decision or taking action. “Give due consideration to” is a formal way of expressing the need to thoroughly consider something.

  • For example, when discussing a proposed policy change, someone might say, “We should give due consideration to the potential impact on marginalized communities.”
  • In a legal context, a judge might instruct the jury, “You must give due consideration to all the evidence presented.”
  • A manager might advise their team, “Before making any major decisions, let’s give due consideration to the feedback we received from our customers.”

57. Take into consideration

To include or think about something when making a decision or forming an opinion. “Take into consideration” is a common phrase used to emphasize the importance of considering all relevant factors.

  • For instance, when choosing a vacation destination, someone might say, “We should take into consideration the weather, cost, and available activities.”
  • In a job interview, an interviewer might ask, “Have you taken into consideration the commute time for this position?”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “When grading your essays, I will take into consideration the quality of your arguments and the organization of your thoughts.”

58. Take into thought

To remember or consider something when making a decision or forming an opinion. “Take into thought” is a less common phrase used to convey the importance of keeping something in mind.

  • For example, when discussing a potential solution to a problem, someone might say, “Let’s take into thought the potential long-term consequences.”
  • In a conversation about personal finances, a financial advisor might advise, “When planning your budget, take into thought unexpected expenses.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “Before making a decision, take into thought how it might affect your future goals.”