Top 50 Slang For Relevant – Meaning & Usage

In a world where trends come and go at lightning speed, staying relevant is key. But how can you keep up with the ever-changing slang that defines our culture? That’s where we come in. We’ve done the research and compiled a list of the top slang words for staying relevant. Whether you’re a social media enthusiast or just trying to keep up with the cool kids, this list is a must-read. Get ready to up your slang game and stay in the know with the latest and greatest words that are totally relevant right now.

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1. On point

When something is “on point,” it means it is accurate, correct, or exactly what is needed or expected. This phrase is often used to describe something that is well-executed or perfectly suited to a particular situation.

  • For example, “Her presentation was on point. She covered all the key points and delivered them with confidence.”
  • A person might say, “That outfit is on point. It’s stylish and suits you perfectly.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might comment, “The band’s performance was on point. They played every note flawlessly.”

2. Lit

When something is described as “lit,” it means it is exciting, amazing, or highly enjoyable. This term is often used to express enthusiasm or to describe a lively and energetic atmosphere.

  • For instance, “The party last night was lit. The music was great and everyone was dancing.”
  • A person might say, “That concert was so lit. The crowd was jumping and the band put on an incredible show.”
  • In a discussion about a thrilling sports game, someone might comment, “The atmosphere in the stadium was lit. The fans were cheering and the energy was electric.”

3. Spot-on

When something is described as “spot-on,” it means it is perfectly accurate or precisely what is needed. This phrase is often used to praise someone or something for being correct or hitting the mark.

  • For example, “Her analysis of the situation was spot-on. She identified all the key factors and made accurate predictions.”
  • A person might say, “Your description of the problem is spot-on. You’ve captured all the important details.”
  • In a discussion about a movie review, someone might comment, “The critic’s assessment of the film was spot-on. They highlighted its strengths and weaknesses perfectly.”

4. Hitting the nail on the head

When someone “hits the nail on the head,” it means they are exactly right or have accurately identified or described something. This phrase is often used to acknowledge someone’s accurate observation or analysis.

  • For instance, “You really hit the nail on the head with your explanation. You’ve captured the essence of the issue.”
  • A person might say, “That comment hits the nail on the head. It perfectly summarizes our concerns.”
  • In a discussion about a problem-solving approach, someone might comment, “This strategy hits the nail on the head. It addresses the root cause of the problem.”

5. In the know

When someone is “in the know,” it means they are well-informed or knowledgeable about a particular topic or situation. This phrase is often used to describe someone who has access to insider information or is aware of current trends or developments.

  • For example, “She’s always in the know about the latest fashion trends. She knows what’s hot before anyone else.”
  • A person might say, “I need to be in the know about industry updates. It’s important to stay informed.”
  • In a discussion about a secret event, someone might comment, “Only those in the know were invited. It was an exclusive gathering.”

6. Clued in

This term refers to someone who is knowledgeable or aware of a particular topic or situation. It implies that the person is up-to-date and has inside information.

  • For example, in a conversation about current events, someone might say, “I’m not clued in on the latest political scandal.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you clued in on the new restaurant that just opened?”
  • In a workplace discussion, a coworker might say, “I’ll keep you clued in on any upcoming changes to the project.”

7. On the money

This phrase means that something is correct or precise. It can refer to information, predictions, or actions that are spot-on or exactly as expected.

  • For instance, if someone makes a correct guess, you might say, “You’re on the money!”
  • In a financial context, someone might say, “His investment advice is always on the money.”
  • A friend might comment, “Your description of the movie was on the money. It was exactly as you said.”

8. Topical

This term describes something that is currently of interest or importance. It refers to information or discussions that are applicable to the present context.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s stick to the topical issues and not get sidetracked.”
  • In a conversation about recent news, someone might comment, “That article is very topical.”
  • A teacher might say, “The assignment should focus on topical themes in literature.”

9. In the loop

This phrase means to be part of a group or conversation where important information is being shared. It implies being included in the communication loop and being aware of what is happening.

  • For instance, if someone is left out of a decision, they might say, “I wish I was in the loop on that.”
  • In a workplace setting, a coworker might say, “I’ll keep you in the loop about any updates to the project.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you keep me in the loop about the party plans?”

10. In tune

This term describes being in sync or in harmony with a particular situation or understanding. It implies being aware of the current state or having a good understanding of something.

  • For example, if someone understands a joke, they might say, “I’m in tune with your sense of humor.”
  • In a discussion about a team’s strategy, someone might comment, “We need to be in tune with each other to succeed.”
  • A musician might say, “It’s important for the band members to be in tune with each other.”

This phrase is used to describe something that is a perfect match for someone’s preferences, abilities, or expertise.

  • For example, if someone who loves cooking is asked to try a new recipe, they might say, “That’s right up my alley!”
  • A person with a passion for fashion might say, “This fashion show is right up my alley.”
  • Someone who enjoys solving puzzles might say, “This crossword puzzle is right up my alley.”

12. Appurtenant

This word is used to describe something that is related or connected to something else.

  • For instance, in a legal context, a lawyer might say, “The evidence is appurtenant to the case.”
  • A real estate agent might say, “The swimming pool is appurtenant to the property.”
  • A person discussing a specific topic might say, “This research is appurtenant to our discussion.”

13. Salient

This word is used to describe something that is prominent, significant, or stands out.

  • For example, a military strategist might say, “The enemy’s salient position is a key target.”
  • A person discussing a movie might say, “The salient theme of the film is love.”
  • A journalist might write, “The salient points of the article are summarized below.”

14. Key

This word is used to describe something that is crucial, essential, or important.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “Communication is key in a successful team.”
  • A person discussing a recipe might say, “The key ingredient in this dish is garlic.”
  • Someone giving advice might say, “Time management is key to achieving your goals.”

15. Pertinent

This word is used to describe something that is relevant, applicable, or related to a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “The witness’s testimony is pertinent to the case.”
  • A teacher might say, “The discussion in today’s class is pertinent to the assigned reading.”
  • A person giving feedback might say, “Your comments are pertinent to the topic of discussion.”

16. Fitting

This term refers to something that is appropriate or suitable in a given context or situation.

  • For example, “That outfit is so fitting for the occasion.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “The soundtrack is fitting for the emotional scenes.”
  • A person might comment on a decision, “It’s fitting that they chose him to lead the project.”

17. Applicable

This word is used to describe something that is relevant or appropriate to a particular situation or topic.

  • For instance, “The rules are applicable to all participants.”
  • In a conversation about a new law, someone might say, “This legislation is applicable to all citizens.”
  • A person might ask, “Is this information applicable to our project?”

18. Connected

This term refers to something that is related or linked to a particular topic or concept.

  • For example, “These two ideas are connected.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The internet and smartphones are closely connected.”
  • A person might comment on a relationship, “We have a deep, connected bond.”

19. Meaningful

This word describes something that is important or has significance in a particular context.

  • For instance, “That was a meaningful conversation.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “The painting carries a meaningful message.”
  • A person might comment on a gesture, “Her gift was really meaningful to me.”

20. Valid

This term is used to describe something that is legitimate or acceptable according to the rules or standards.

  • For example, “Your argument is valid.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “That point is valid and deserves consideration.”
  • A person might comment on a coupon, “This offer is valid until the end of the month.”

21. Essential

Something that is absolutely necessary or vital. “Essential” is often used to describe something that is indispensable or of utmost importance.

  • For example, “Having a good night’s sleep is essential for overall health and well-being.”
  • In a recipe, a chef might say, “Salt is an essential ingredient for enhancing flavors.”
  • A person discussing a job requirement might say, “Strong communication skills are essential for success in this role.”

22. Fire

Used to describe something that is exceptional, impressive, or outstanding. “Fire” is often used to express enthusiasm or admiration for someone or something.

  • For instance, “Her performance on stage was absolutely fire!”
  • A person might comment on a delicious meal, saying, “This pizza is fire.”
  • A friend might compliment another’s outfit, saying, “You look fire in that dress!”

23. Clutch

Refers to something that is incredibly important or necessary in a crucial moment. “Clutch” is often used to describe someone or something that performs exceptionally well under pressure.

  • For example, “He made a clutch shot at the last second to win the game.”
  • A person might say, “Having a spare tire in your car is clutch in case of a flat.”
  • A friend might rely on someone’s help and say, “Thanks for coming through in the clutch!”

24. Nailing it

Means to do something exceptionally well or to accomplish a task with great skill or accuracy. “Nailing it” is often used to express approval or admiration for someone’s performance.

  • For instance, “She nailed the presentation and impressed the entire team.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been practicing for weeks, and I finally nailed that difficult guitar solo.”
  • A friend might compliment another’s cooking, saying, “You really nailed this dish!”

25. In the zone

Refers to a state of intense concentration or productivity. “In the zone” is often used to describe someone who is fully immersed in their work or activity and performing at their best.

  • For example, “The athlete was in the zone and scored three goals in a row.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t talk right now, I’m in the zone with this project.”
  • A friend might notice someone’s productivity and say, “You’re really in the zone today!”

This phrase means that something is exactly correct or accurate.

  • For example, if someone makes a prediction that turns out to be true, you might say, “Wow, your prediction was right on the mark!”
  • In a discussion about a movie review, someone might comment, “The critic’s assessment of the film was right on the mark.”
  • A person might say, “Your feedback was right on the mark. It helped me improve my presentation.”

27. Tapping into

This phrase refers to the act of accessing or utilizing something, often in a creative or resourceful way.

  • For instance, if someone is able to use their network connections to find a job opportunity, you might say they are “tapping into” their connections.
  • In a discussion about marketing strategies, someone might say, “We need to tap into social media platforms to reach our target audience.”
  • A person might comment, “She has a talent for tapping into the latest fashion trends.”

28. In tune with

This phrase means to be in harmony or aligned with something, often referring to understanding or being aware of a particular topic or trend.

  • For example, if someone has a deep understanding of current pop culture, you might say they are “in tune with” the latest trends.
  • In a discussion about music, someone might comment, “The band’s new album is in tune with the current indie music scene.”
  • A person might say, “I try to stay in tune with the needs and preferences of my target audience.”

29. Apropos

This word means that something is relevant or appropriate to a particular situation or topic.

  • For instance, if someone makes a timely and relevant comment during a discussion, you might say it was “apropos.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “That accessory is quite apropos for the occasion.”
  • A person might comment, “Your suggestion is apropos to the current problem we’re facing.”

30. Apposite

This word means that something is suitable or fitting for a particular situation or purpose.

  • For example, if someone comes up with a solution that is perfectly fitting for a problem, you might say it is “apposite.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might comment, “The author’s choice of words is apposite to the theme of the novel.”
  • A person might say, “Your example is apposite to the point I was trying to make.”

31. Material

This term is used to describe something that is significant or relevant to a particular situation or topic. It suggests that the information or content being discussed is crucial or essential.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the material aspects of the proposal.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Pay attention to the material covered in this chapter, as it will be on the exam.”
  • In a news article, the author might state, “The material presented here sheds light on the current political climate.”

32. Significant

This word is used to describe something that is important or relevant in a significant way. It implies that the subject or topic being discussed holds great meaning or value.

  • For instance, a historian might say, “The discovery of this artifact is significant in understanding ancient civilizations.”
  • A person might exclaim, “That’s a significant achievement! Congratulations!”
  • In a scientific study, a researcher might state, “The results of this experiment are significant and support our hypothesis.”

This term is used to describe something that is connected or associated with a particular topic or subject. It suggests that the information or content being discussed is relevant and has a direct connection to the main topic.

  • For example, in a conversation about music, someone might say, “This artist is related to the genre of rock and roll.”
  • A researcher might state, “The study found that stress is related to increased health problems.”
  • In a news article, the author might mention, “The incident is related to a previous series of events.”

34. Relative

This word is used to describe something that is similar or comparable to a particular subject or topic. It implies that the information or content being discussed has a relevant connection and can be compared to the main topic.

  • For instance, in a discussion about different car models, someone might say, “This car is relative to the other models in terms of performance.”
  • A person might ask, “How does this situation relative to the one we faced last year?”
  • In a scientific study, a researcher might state, “The findings are relative to previous research conducted in this field.”

35. Proximate

This word is used to describe something that is close or near in proximity to a particular subject or topic. It suggests that the information or content being discussed is directly connected and has immediate relevance.

  • For example, in a legal case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence presented is proximate to the crime scene.”
  • A person might say, “The decision we make now is proximate to the success of our project.”
  • In a news article, the author might state, “The event is proximate to the upcoming elections and has political implications.”

36. Suitable

This word is used to describe something that is appropriate or fitting for a particular purpose or situation.

  • For example, “That dress is suitable for a formal event.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I believe my skills and experience make me suitable for this position.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Please choose a suitable topic for your research project.”

37. Fit

When something is described as “fit,” it means it is suitable or appropriate for a particular purpose or situation.

  • For instance, “That color of paint is a good fit for the room.”
  • In a discussion about hiring, someone might say, “We need to find a candidate who is a good fit for our company culture.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “Your answer is a good fit for the question.”

38. Corresponding

When something is described as “corresponding,” it means it matches or is in agreement with something else.

  • For example, “The corresponding page in the textbook has more information on this topic.”
  • In a conversation about data analysis, someone might say, “We need to find the corresponding data points in order to make accurate conclusions.”
  • A manager might tell an employee, “Please update the corresponding spreadsheet with the new sales figures.”

39. Appropriate

This word is used to describe something that is suitable or fitting for a particular purpose or situation.

  • For instance, “That joke is not appropriate for this formal event.”
  • In a discussion about classroom behavior, a teacher might say, “It’s important for students to use appropriate language.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Wearing pajamas to a wedding is not appropriate attire.”

40. Spot on

When something is described as “spot on,” it means it is exactly right or accurate.

  • For example, “Your analysis of the situation was spot on.”
  • In a conversation about a movie review, someone might say, “The critic’s assessment of the film was spot on.”
  • A friend might say to another, “Your guess about what would happen was spot on.”

41. On the pulse

Being “on the pulse” means being aware of the latest trends, news, or information in a particular area.

  • For example, a fashion blogger might say, “I always try to stay on the pulse of the latest fashion trends.”
  • A tech enthusiast might comment, “If you want to be on the pulse of the latest gadgets, follow this tech blog.”
  • Someone discussing current events might say, “Being on the pulse of the news helps you stay informed and engaged.”

42. In the swim

To be “in the swim” means to be knowledgeable or well-informed about a particular subject or situation.

  • For instance, a political analyst might say, “To understand the upcoming election, you need to be in the swim of the political landscape.”
  • A sports fan might comment, “To make accurate predictions, you have to be in the swim of the team’s performance.”
  • Someone discussing the stock market might say, “Being in the swim of market trends is crucial for successful investing.”

43. In the game

Being “in the game” means being knowledgeable, skilled, or competent in a particular area.

  • For example, a business consultant might say, “To succeed in the industry, you need to be in the game and constantly learning.”
  • A gamer might comment, “To beat the competition, you have to be in the game and practice regularly.”
  • Someone discussing job interviews might say, “To impress employers, you need to be in the game and know your strengths.”

44. In the know-how

Being “in the know-how” means being knowledgeable or well-informed about a particular subject or skill.

  • For instance, a cooking enthusiast might say, “To create delicious dishes, you need to be in the know-how of different cooking techniques.”
  • A DIY enthusiast might comment, “To successfully complete home improvement projects, you have to be in the know-how of various tools and techniques.”
  • Someone discussing technology might say, “Being in the know-how of the latest software updates can help you troubleshoot common issues.”

45. On the radar

To be “on the radar” means to be considered or noticed in a particular context or situation.

  • For example, a talented musician might say, “I’m working hard to get my music on the radar of record labels.”
  • A job seeker might comment, “To land your dream job, you need to get your resume on the radar of hiring managers.”
  • Someone discussing social media might say, “If you want to grow your following, you need to get your content on the radar of influencers and trendsetters.”

46. On the mark

When something is “on the mark,” it means that it is precise or exact. This phrase is often used to indicate that something is accurate or correct.

  • For example, “Her prediction was right on the mark.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “His shot was on the mark, hitting the bullseye.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Your analysis is on the mark, and we should follow your recommendation.”

47. On the button

When something is “on the button,” it means that it is exactly right or perfectly timed. This phrase is often used to describe something that is done with precision or at the perfect moment.

  • For instance, “Her response was on the button, addressing all the concerns.”
  • A chef might say, “The steak is cooked on the button, medium-rare.”
  • In a game show, the host might say, “Congratulations! Your answer was on the button and you’ve won the grand prize.”

48. On the nose

When something is “on the nose,” it means that it is precisely correct or accurate. This phrase is often used to describe something that is exactly as expected or predicted.

  • For example, “Her estimate was on the nose, matching the actual cost.”
  • A weather forecaster might say, “The storm arrived on the nose, just as predicted.”
  • In a movie review, a critic might write, “The actor’s performance was on the nose, capturing the essence of the character.”

49. On the level

When something is “on the level,” it means that it is honest or truthful. This phrase is often used to describe someone or something that can be trusted.

  • For instance, “I can vouch for him, he’s always on the level.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to determine if the witness is on the level.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might ask, “Can we be sure that the other party is on the level?”

50. On the case

When someone is “on the case,” it means that they are actively investigating or working on something. This phrase is often used to describe someone who is diligently pursuing a task or problem.

  • For example, “The detective is on the case, gathering evidence.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m on the case, researching the story.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s assign someone to be on the case and find a solution.”
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