Top 24 Slang For Conspiracy – Meaning & Usage

Conspiracy theories have always piqued our curiosity and made us question the world around us. From secret societies to government cover-ups, the realm of conspiracies is vast and complex. Join us as we unravel the mysterious world of conspiracy slang and explore the language that conspiracy theorists use to navigate through the shadows. Get ready to dive deep into this listicle and uncover the hidden meanings behind the most intriguing conspiracy terms out there!

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1. Illuminati

Refers to a secret society that is believed to control world events and manipulate governments. The Illuminati conspiracy theory suggests that a group of powerful individuals or organizations are working behind the scenes to control society.

  • For example, someone might say, “The Illuminati is secretly controlling the music industry.”
  • In a discussion about global politics, a person might claim, “The Illuminati is pulling the strings behind every major event.”
  • Another might argue, “The Illuminati is just a made-up conspiracy theory with no real evidence.”

2. Shadow government

Refers to a group or organization that is believed to control a government from behind the scenes. The shadow government conspiracy theory suggests that there is a hidden power structure that influences political decisions and policies.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The shadow government is responsible for all the corruption in our country.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, a person might claim, “The shadow government is manipulating the media to control public opinion.”
  • Another might argue, “The idea of a shadow government is just a paranoid fantasy with no basis in reality.”

3. Chemtrails

Refers to the belief that the white trails left behind by airplanes are actually chemicals or biological agents being sprayed for nefarious purposes. The chemtrails conspiracy theory suggests that these trails are not simply condensation, but rather a deliberate act of chemical dispersion.

  • For example, someone might say, “The government is using chemtrails to control the population.”
  • In a discussion about weather patterns, a person might claim, “Chemtrails are altering our climate.”
  • Another might argue, “The chemtrails conspiracy theory has been thoroughly debunked by scientific evidence.”

4. Cover-up

Refers to the act of hiding or suppressing information or evidence, often related to a controversial or sensitive topic. The cover-up conspiracy theory suggests that powerful individuals or organizations are actively working to keep the truth hidden from the public.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The government is involved in a cover-up of extraterrestrial contact.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, a person might claim, “There’s a cover-up surrounding the assassination of JFK.”
  • Another might argue, “Cover-ups are a common tactic used by those in power to maintain control.”

5. Mind control

Refers to the belief that individuals or organizations have the ability to control or influence the thoughts, beliefs, and actions of others. The mind control conspiracy theory suggests that there are covert methods being used to manipulate and control people’s minds.

  • For example, someone might say, “The government is using mind control techniques to create obedient citizens.”
  • In a discussion about popular culture, a person might claim, “There are hidden messages in music that are designed for mind control.”
  • Another might argue, “The idea of mind control is a paranoid delusion with no scientific basis.”

6. False narrative

A false narrative refers to a misleading or fabricated story or account that is spread with the intention of deceiving or manipulating people’s beliefs or opinions.

  • For example, “The politician spread a false narrative about his opponent’s stance on healthcare.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial event, someone might say, “There are many false narratives being circulated to distract from the truth.”
  • A journalist might write, “The false narrative surrounding climate change has hindered progress in addressing the issue.”

7. Hoax

A hoax is a deliberate act of deception or trickery, typically intended to fool or mislead people into believing something that is not true.

  • For instance, “The viral video turned out to be a hoax orchestrated by a group of pranksters.”
  • A person discussing internet rumors might say, “It’s important to fact-check before sharing information to avoid spreading hoaxes.”
  • A news article might report, “The company’s announcement of a new product was revealed to be a hoax to generate publicity.”

8. Black helicopter

The term “black helicopter” is often used as a symbol of conspiracy theories, particularly those involving government surveillance or secret military operations.

  • For example, “Conspiracy theorists claim that black helicopters are used by the government to spy on citizens.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “The idea of black helicopters patrolling the skies has become a common trope.”
  • A journalist might write, “The black helicopter theory gained popularity during the Cold War era.”

9. Big Brother

“Big Brother” is a term derived from George Orwell’s dystopian novel “1984” and is often used to refer to government surveillance and invasion of privacy.

  • For instance, “People are concerned about Big Brother watching their every move through surveillance cameras.”
  • In a discussion about privacy rights, someone might say, “We must protect ourselves from becoming victims of Big Brother.”
  • A news article might report, “The rise of technology has raised concerns about the power of Big Brother.”

10. NWO

NWO is an abbreviation for “New World Order,” a conspiracy theory that suggests the existence of a secretive global elite group aiming to establish a totalitarian world government.

  • For example, “Conspiracy theorists claim that the NWO is orchestrating major world events.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “The idea of the NWO has been widely debunked by experts.”
  • A journalist might write, “The NWO conspiracy theory has gained traction among certain fringe groups.”

11. Cabal

A cabal refers to a secret group of people who are believed to be involved in a conspiracy or plot. The term is often used to describe a powerful and secretive organization that controls events behind the scenes.

  • For example, conspiracy theorists might claim, “The cabal is manipulating world governments to achieve their own agenda.”
  • In a discussion about secret societies, someone might say, “The Illuminati is often referred to as a cabal.”
  • A person interested in conspiracy theories might ask, “Who do you think is part of the cabal?”

12. Red pill

The term “red pill” comes from the movie “The Matrix” and is used to describe the act of becoming aware of the true nature of reality or a hidden truth. It is often associated with conspiracy theories and the rejection of mainstream beliefs.

  • For instance, a person who starts questioning the official narrative might say, “I took the red pill and now I see things differently.”
  • In a discussion about government cover-ups, someone might comment, “Once you take the red pill, there’s no going back.”
  • A person interested in conspiracy theories might ask, “Have you red-pilled anyone lately?”

13. Cointelpro

Cointelpro was a covert and controversial FBI program that aimed to surveil, infiltrate, and disrupt various political organizations and movements in the United States. It is often associated with conspiracy theories and government manipulation.

  • For example, a person discussing government surveillance might mention, “Cointelpro targeted civil rights activists and anti-war groups.”
  • In a conversation about historical conspiracies, someone might say, “Cointelpro was a clear violation of civil liberties.”
  • A person interested in conspiracy theories might ask, “Do you think Cointelpro is still active today?”

14. Operation Mockingbird

Operation Mockingbird was a alleged CIA program that aimed to influence and control the media during the Cold War era. It is often cited as an example of government manipulation and conspiracy theories related to media control.

  • For instance, a person discussing media bias might bring up, “Operation Mockingbird as an example of covert media manipulation.”
  • In a conversation about government secrecy, someone might comment, “Operation Mockingbird shows how far the government is willing to go to control the narrative.”
  • A person interested in conspiracy theories might ask, “What other operations like Mockingbird do you think are still happening?”

15. Project Blue Beam

Project Blue Beam is a conspiracy theory that claims the government or other powerful entities are planning to use advanced technology to create a fake global event, such as a UFO invasion or a second coming of Jesus, in order to control and manipulate the masses.

  • For example, a person discussing conspiracy theories might mention, “Project Blue Beam as an example of a grand deception.”
  • In a conversation about government secrets, someone might comment, “Project Blue Beam is a mind-blowing conspiracy theory.”
  • A person interested in conspiracy theories might ask, “What evidence is there to support the existence of Project Blue Beam?”

16. Crisis actors

This term refers to individuals who are allegedly hired to pretend to be victims or witnesses of a crisis or tragedy. Conspiracy theorists believe that crisis actors are used to create false narratives and manipulate public perception.

  • For instance, some conspiracy theorists claim that the Sandy Hook shooting was a hoax and that the victims were crisis actors.
  • In online discussions, someone might say, “Those crisis actors were terrible actors. It was so obvious they were faking it.”
  • Another might argue, “The use of crisis actors is a tactic employed by the government to control the narrative and push their agenda.”

17. Controlled demolition

This term refers to the belief that a building or structure was intentionally destroyed through the use of explosives or other means, rather than being destroyed by natural causes or accidents. Conspiracy theorists often claim that controlled demolitions are used to cover up evidence or create false narratives.

  • For example, some conspiracy theorists believe that the World Trade Center towers were brought down by a controlled demolition rather than by the impact of the planes on 9/11.
  • In a discussion about building collapses, someone might say, “That building came down too perfectly. It had to be a controlled demolition.”
  • Another might argue, “The government orchestrated a controlled demolition to hide the truth about what really happened.”

18. Freemasons

The Freemasons are a fraternal organization that traces its origins back to the medieval stonemason guilds. Conspiracy theories often surround the Freemasons, with some believing that they control world events and governments from behind the scenes.

  • For instance, conspiracy theorists might claim that the Freemasons are responsible for the New World Order and are working to establish a global government.
  • In online discussions, someone might say, “The Freemasons are just a harmless social club. The conspiracy theories are baseless.”
  • Another might argue, “The Freemasons have a long history of secrecy and influence. It’s not just a coincidence.”

19. 9/11 truther

This term refers to individuals who believe in alternative explanations for the events of the September 11th attacks. 9/11 truthers often question the official narrative and believe that there is a larger conspiracy at play.

  • For example, some 9/11 truthers claim that the attacks were an inside job orchestrated by the U.S. government.
  • In online discussions, someone might say, “I used to be a 9/11 truther, but I’ve since realized that the evidence doesn’t support the conspiracy theories.”
  • Another might argue, “Being a 9/11 truther doesn’t mean you’re crazy. It means you’re willing to question the official story and seek the truth.”

20. Tin foil hat

This term is used to describe someone who is considered to be paranoid or overly suspicious of government surveillance or conspiracy theories. The term originates from the idea that wearing a hat made of tin foil can protect the wearer’s thoughts from being read by mind-control devices.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe he’s still wearing that tin foil hat. He’s completely lost touch with reality.”
  • In online discussions, someone might jokingly say, “I better put on my tin foil hat before I start talking about conspiracy theories.”
  • Another might use the term to dismiss someone’s ideas, saying, “Don’t listen to him, he’s just a tin foil hat wearing nutjob.”

21. The Black Budget

Refers to the portion of a government’s budget that is allocated to classified or covert operations. The term “black” indicates the secrecy surrounding these funds.

  • For example, conspiracy theorists might claim, “The black budget is used to finance top-secret military projects.”
  • In a discussion about government transparency, someone might say, “We need more oversight of the black budget to prevent misuse of funds.”
  • A journalist investigating government spending might write, “The black budget has long been a topic of speculation and controversy.”

22. The Octopus

Often used to represent a hidden network of individuals or organizations that exert control or influence over various aspects of society. The term “the octopus” suggests the far-reaching tentacles of this alleged group.

  • For instance, a conspiracy theorist might claim, “The octopus controls the media, politics, and the economy.”
  • In a conversation about global power dynamics, someone might say, “The octopus is a metaphor for the shadowy forces that shape our world.”
  • A writer discussing conspiracy theories might explain, “The octopus is a common symbol in conspiracy lore, representing the idea of a hidden power structure.”

23. The Big Lie

Refers to a deliberate and significant falsehood spread to manipulate public opinion or obscure the truth. The term “the big lie” is often used to describe a particularly audacious and impactful falsehood.

  • For example, a critic might accuse a politician of perpetuating “the big lie” during a campaign.
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might say, “Hitler’s propaganda machine relied on the big lie to gain support.”
  • A journalist investigating misinformation might write, “Identifying and debunking the big lie is crucial in combating disinformation.”

24. The Puppeteers

Refers to individuals or groups who are believed to control or manipulate events from behind the scenes, often without public knowledge. The term “the puppeteers” implies that these unseen forces are pulling the strings of those in power.

  • For instance, a conspiracy theorist might claim, “The puppeteers are responsible for orchestrating global conflicts.”
  • In a conversation about government influence, someone might say, “The puppeteers are the real power brokers in politics.”
  • A writer exploring conspiracy theories might explain, “The concept of the puppeteers suggests that there are hidden forces shaping the world.”
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