Top 25 Slang For Relatively – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about relationships and comparisons, using the right slang can make all the difference. Join us as we unveil some of the most popular and trendy phrases for “relatively” that are taking the English language by storm. Whether you’re a linguistic enthusiast or just looking to stay up-to-date with the latest trends, this listicle is sure to pique your interest and expand your vocabulary. So, get ready to impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of slang for “relatively”!

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1. Kinda

This slang term is used to indicate a moderate or partial agreement or similarity. It is often used when someone is expressing a hesitant or unsure opinion.

  • For example, “I kinda like that new song by Taylor Swift.”
  • In a conversation about food preferences, someone might say, “I’m kinda hungry, but I don’t know what I want to eat.”
  • A person might use it to soften criticism, saying, “That movie was kinda boring, but the acting was good.”

2. Sorta

Similar to “kinda,” this slang term is used to express a moderate or partial agreement or similarity. It is often used when someone is unsure or hesitant about something.

  • For instance, “I sorta understand what you’re saying, but I need more information.”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might say, “I’m sorta busy tomorrow, but I might be able to make it.”
  • A person might use it to express uncertainty, saying, “I sorta like that dress, but I’m not sure if it suits me.”

3. Somewhat

This term is used to indicate a moderate or partial agreement or similarity. It suggests that something is true or exists, but not to a great extent.

  • For example, “I somewhat agree with your opinion on that topic.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s skills, someone might say, “He’s somewhat talented, but he still has room for improvement.”
  • A person might use it to express a mild level of surprise, saying, “I’m somewhat surprised that she won the competition.”

4. Kind of-ish

This slang term combines “kind of” and “ish” to express a moderate or partial agreement or similarity, with a hint of uncertainty or hesitation.

  • For instance, “I kind of-ish like that new restaurant, but the service was a bit slow.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s personality, someone might say, “He’s kind of-ish funny, but his jokes can be hit or miss.”
  • A person might use it to express a mixed opinion, saying, “The movie was kind of-ish entertaining, but the plot was confusing.”

5. Pretty

This term is used to indicate a relatively high degree or level of something. It suggests that something is more than average or expected, but not to an extreme extent.

  • For example, “She’s pretty tall for her age.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s skills, someone might say, “He’s pretty good at playing the guitar.”
  • A person might use it to express admiration, saying, “That painting is pretty impressive.”

6. Moderately

This word is used to indicate something is done or exists to a moderate extent. It suggests a level of moderation or average-ness.

  • For example, “I’m moderately excited about the new movie release.”
  • Someone might say, “The weather is moderately warm today.”
  • Another might comment, “She is moderately talented at playing the piano.”

7. Fairly

This word is used to indicate something is done or exists to a reasonable or moderate extent. It suggests a level of fairness or adequacy.

  • For instance, “I’m fairly confident in my abilities.”
  • A person might say, “The food was fairly good at that restaurant.”
  • Another might comment, “He is fairly tall for his age.”

8. Quite

This word is used to indicate something is done or exists to a considerable or significant extent. It suggests a level of intensity or emphasis.

  • For example, “I’m quite tired after a long day.”
  • Someone might say, “The movie was quite entertaining.”
  • Another might comment, “She is quite skilled at playing the guitar.”

9. Rather

This word is used to indicate something is done or exists to a somewhat significant extent. It suggests a level of preference or preference.

  • For instance, “I’m rather fond of that book.”
  • A person might say, “The weather is rather cold today.”
  • Another might comment, “He is rather quiet in social settings.”

10. Relatively speaking

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being considered or compared to other things or situations. It suggests a level of comparison or context.

  • For example, “Relatively speaking, the price is quite reasonable.”
  • Someone might say, “Relatively speaking, this car is more fuel-efficient than others in its class.”
  • Another might comment, “Relatively speaking, she is the fastest runner on the team.”

11. In a way

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or applicable to a certain degree, but not completely or exactly. It suggests a level of approximation or similarity.

  • For example, “In a way, we are all connected by our shared experiences.”
  • A person might say, “In a way, he’s right, but there are other factors to consider.”
  • Someone might argue, “In a way, it’s a form of art, but it lacks the traditional techniques.”

12. In a sense

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or applicable in a specific manner or aspect, but not necessarily in every way or aspect.

  • For instance, “In a sense, we are all responsible for the environment.”
  • A person might say, “In a sense, it’s a form of therapy, but with a unique approach.”
  • Someone might argue, “In a sense, it’s a competition, but the focus is on collaboration.”

13. More or less

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or accurate to a certain extent, but not exactly or precisely. It suggests a level of approximation or estimation.

  • For example, “The project will take more or less a month to complete.”
  • A person might say, “He’s more or less a good singer, but he lacks stage presence.”
  • Someone might argue, “The movie was more or less a success, but it didn’t meet expectations.”

14. In a manner of speaking

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being said or described in a way that is not entirely literal or strictly true. It suggests a level of metaphorical or symbolic expression.

  • For instance, “He’s the king of the office, in a manner of speaking.”
  • A person might say, “She’s a superhero, in a manner of speaking, always coming to the rescue.”
  • Someone might argue, “The painting captures the essence of love, in a manner of speaking.”

15. To some degree

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or applicable to a certain level or extent, but not completely or fully. It suggests a level of partiality or limitation.

  • For example, “To some degree, we are influenced by our surroundings.”
  • A person might say, “He’s successful, to some degree, but he still has room for improvement.”
  • Someone might argue, “To some degree, it’s a fair assessment, but there are other factors to consider.”

16. To some extent

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or applicable to a certain degree, but not completely. It suggests that there is a limit or boundary to the extent of something.

  • For example, “To some extent, I understand why he made that decision.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “To some extent, I agree with their argument.”
  • A person reflecting on their achievements might say, “To some extent, my success is due to hard work and determination.”

17. To a certain extent

This phrase is similar in meaning to “to some extent” and is used to express that something is true or valid up to a particular limit or level.

  • For instance, “To a certain extent, I can relate to what you’re going through.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “To a certain extent, government intervention is necessary.”
  • A person discussing their preferences might say, “I enjoy spicy food, but only to a certain extent.”

18. To a degree

This phrase is another way of expressing that something is true or applicable up to a certain extent or level.

  • For example, “To a degree, I understand their perspective.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “To a degree, human activity contributes to global warming.”
  • A person evaluating their skills might say, “I’m competent in this field, but only to a degree.”

19. To a point

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or valid up to a specific limit or boundary.

  • For instance, “I agree with you to a point, but I think there are other factors to consider.”
  • In a conversation about personal boundaries, someone might say, “I’m open to discussing my personal life, but only to a point.”
  • A person discussing their tolerance might say, “I can handle criticism to a point, but there’s a limit to what I can tolerate.”

20. To a certain point

This phrase is similar in meaning to “to a certain extent” and is used to express that something is true or valid up to a specific extent or level.

  • For example, “I can sympathize with you to a certain point, but I have my own perspective.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might argue, “Standardized testing is useful to a certain point, but it shouldn’t be the sole measure of a student’s abilities.”
  • A person discussing their willingness to compromise might say, “I’m willing to negotiate to a certain point, but there are some non-negotiables.”

21. Relatively

This word is used to describe something in comparison to something else. It indicates that the thing being described is moderate or average in relation to others.

  • For example, “The weather is relatively warm today.”
  • In a discussion about population growth, one might say, “The city’s population has grown relatively quickly over the past decade.”
  • Someone might comment on a person’s height, saying, “He’s relatively tall compared to his siblings.”

22. Marginally

This word is used to describe something that is only slightly or minimally different from something else. It suggests a small degree of change or variation.

  • For instance, “The price of the product has marginally increased.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might say, “He has marginally improved his productivity.”
  • Someone might describe a movie as “marginally better than its predecessor.”
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23. Slightly

This word is used to describe something in a small degree or to a limited extent. It suggests a minor or subtle change or difference.

  • For example, “She’s slightly taller than her sister.”
  • In a cooking recipe, one might say, “Add a slightly larger amount of salt for more flavor.”
  • Someone might comment on a person’s accent, saying, “He has a slightly different pronunciation than the others.”

24. A bit

This phrase is used to describe something to a small extent or degree. It suggests a moderate or mild change or difference.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling a bit tired after the long day.”
  • In a discussion about food spiciness, one might say, “This dish is a bit spicy.”
  • Someone might comment on a person’s performance, saying, “He’s a bit slow in completing tasks.”

25. In some respects

This phrase is used to describe something that is true or valid to some extent or in certain aspects. It suggests that there are specific areas or aspects where the statement applies.

  • For example, “In some respects, she is similar to her mother.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, one might say, “I agree with him in some respects.”
  • Someone might comment on a product, saying, “In some respects, this phone is better than its competitors.”