Top 43 Slang For Constipation – Meaning & Usage

Dealing with constipation can be a real pain in the you-know-what. But fear not, because we’ve got your back(side) with a list of the top slang terms for constipation. From “backed up” to “clogged pipes,” we’ve compiled a hilarious and relatable collection that will have you laughing while you wait for things to, well, move along. So grab a seat and get ready to flush out your knowledge of constipation slang!

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1. Backed up

This term refers to a situation where feces are unable to pass through the intestines smoothly, resulting in difficulty or delay in bowel movements.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling really backed up lately, I need to find a solution.”
  • A person might say, “I ate too much cheese and now I’m all backed up.”
  • A doctor might ask, “Have you been experiencing any symptoms of being backed up?”

2. Clogged pipes

This phrase is a metaphorical way of describing a situation where the intestines are blocked or obstructed, preventing the normal flow of feces.

  • For instance, “I need to eat more fiber to prevent clogged pipes.”
  • A person might complain, “My clogged pipes are causing me so much discomfort.”
  • A doctor might explain, “Clogged pipes can lead to various digestive issues if not addressed.”

3. Stuck

In the context of constipation, “stuck” refers to the feeling of being unable to have a bowel movement or the sensation that the stool is not moving through the intestines.

  • For example, “I’ve been trying to go to the bathroom for hours, but I feel completely stuck.”
  • A person might say, “I hate feeling stuck, it’s so uncomfortable.”
  • A doctor might ask, “Have you been experiencing any pain or bloating while being stuck?”

4. Plugged up

This term is often used to describe the sensation of having a blockage or obstruction in the intestines, preventing the normal passage of stool.

  • For instance, “I need to drink more water to prevent getting plugged up.”
  • A person might complain, “I feel so plugged up, I can’t go to the bathroom.”
  • A doctor might advise, “Eating a diet high in fiber can help prevent getting plugged up.”

5. Logjam

This term is a metaphorical way of describing a state of constipation where the stool is stuck and unable to move through the digestive system smoothly.

  • For example, “I’ve been dealing with a logjam for days, it’s really uncomfortable.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a solution to this logjam, it’s causing me pain.”
  • A doctor might ask, “How long have you been experiencing this logjam? Are you also experiencing any other symptoms?”

6. Bowel bound

This term refers to a condition where the bowels are unable to move and pass stool, resulting in constipation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been feeling bowel bound for days and it’s really uncomfortable.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might complain, “I hate feeling bowel bound, it’s so frustrating.”
  • In a discussion about digestive health, someone might ask, “What are some remedies for being bowel bound?”

7. Jammed up

This slang term is used to describe the feeling of being blocked or obstructed, similar to how a jammed machine or traffic jam can impede progress.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been eating too much cheese and now I’m all jammed up.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might complain, “I feel so jammed up, nothing seems to be moving.”
  • In a conversation about digestive issues, someone might ask, “Any tips for getting unjammed when you’re all blocked up?”

8. Stifled

This term describes the feeling of being unable to pass stool easily, often due to constipation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I feel so stifled, it’s like nothing wants to come out.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might complain, “I hate feeling stifled, it’s so uncomfortable.”
  • In a discussion about digestive health, someone might ask, “What can I do to relieve the feeling of being stifled?”

9. Blocked

This slang term refers to the condition of being obstructed or unable to pass stool.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been blocked for days and it’s really frustrating.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might complain, “I hate feeling blocked, it’s so uncomfortable.”
  • In a conversation about digestive issues, someone might ask, “Any tips for getting unblocked when you’re constipated?”

10. Corked

This term is used to describe the feeling of being blocked or obstructed, similar to how a cork can block the flow of liquid.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been eating too much cheese and now I’m all corked up.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might complain, “I feel so corked, nothing seems to be moving.”
  • In a discussion about digestive issues, someone might ask, “Any remedies for getting uncorked when you’re constipated?”

11. Stopped up

This term refers to the condition of having a blocked or obstructed bowel movement. It implies that the normal flow of waste through the digestive system has been halted or slowed down.

  • For example, “I ate too much cheese and now I’m stopped up.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might say, “I’ve been stopped up for days and it’s really uncomfortable.”
  • Another might complain, “I can’t go to the bathroom because I’m stopped up.”

12. Packed up

This slang term suggests that the waste material in the digestive system is accumulating and not being properly eliminated. It implies a sense of being “backed up” or unable to have a normal bowel movement.

  • For instance, “I haven’t gone to the bathroom in days, I’m all packed up.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might say, “I feel so bloated and packed up.”
  • Another might express frustration, “I hate feeling all packed up, it’s so uncomfortable.”

13. Congested

This term suggests a state of blockage or obstruction in the digestive system, similar to how nasal congestion refers to a blockage in the nose. It implies a sense of the waste material not being able to flow freely through the intestines.

  • For example, “I feel so congested, I can’t have a proper bowel movement.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might say, “My stomach feels so congested and heavy.”
  • Another might describe their discomfort, “I hate feeling all congested, it’s like my intestines are blocked.”

14. Hindered

This term implies that the normal movement of waste through the digestive system is being impeded or slowed down. It suggests a sense of being “hindered” or prevented from having a regular bowel movement.

  • For instance, “I feel so hindered, I can’t seem to have a proper poop.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might say, “I feel so hindered, it’s like my body is not cooperating.”
  • Another might express frustration, “I hate feeling all hindered, it’s so uncomfortable.”

15. Impacted

This term suggests a more severe form of constipation where the waste material becomes hardened and stuck in the intestines, causing a complete blockage. It implies a sense of the waste being “impacted” or tightly packed together.

  • For example, “I’m so impacted that I can’t even pass gas.”
  • A person experiencing severe constipation might say, “I’m completely impacted, I can’t have a bowel movement at all.”
  • Another might describe their discomfort, “I feel so bloated and impacted, it’s like there’s a rock in my stomach.”

16. Obstructed

When referring to constipation, “obstructed” means that the normal flow of stool through the intestines is blocked or hindered. It can also refer to the feeling of being unable to pass stool.

  • For example, someone might say, “I feel obstructed and can’t seem to have a bowel movement.”
  • In a discussion about digestive issues, a person might ask, “Does anyone else experience frequent obstructed bowels?”
  • A doctor might diagnose a patient with “obstructed defecation,“obstructed defecation,” indicating difficulty in passing stool due to an obstruction in the rectum or anus.
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17. Sealed

In the context of constipation, “sealed” refers to the sensation of the bowels being closed off or shut tight, making it difficult to have a bowel movement.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I feel like my intestines are sealed and I can’t pass anything.”
  • In a conversation about digestive problems, someone might ask, “Has anyone else experienced the sensation of their bowels being sealed?”
  • A doctor might explain to a patient that their constipation is due to the stool being sealed in the intestines, causing a blockage.

18. Stalled

When used to describe constipation, “stalled” means that the normal progression of stool through the intestines is delayed or halted, resulting in difficulty or inability to have a bowel movement.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been stalled for days and can’t seem to go.”
  • In a discussion about digestive issues, a person might share, “I often experience bouts of stalled bowels.”
  • A doctor might explain to a patient that their constipation is due to the stool getting stalled in the colon, leading to a backup.

19. Clogged up

In the context of constipation, “clogged up” refers to the sensation of the bowels being blocked or congested, making it difficult to pass stool.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I feel clogged up and can’t seem to have a normal bowel movement.”
  • In a conversation about digestive problems, someone might ask, “Anyone else dealing with frequent bouts of feeling clogged up?”
  • A doctor might inform a patient that their constipation is due to the stool becoming clogged up in the intestines, causing a backup.

20. Stuffed up

When referring to constipation, “stuffed up” means that the intestines are filled to capacity or congested, resulting in difficulty or inability to pass stool.

  • For example, someone might say, “I feel stuffed up and can’t relieve myself.”
  • In a discussion about digestive issues, a person might share, “I often experience the sensation of being stuffed up in my bowels.”
  • A doctor might explain to a patient that their constipation is due to the intestines being stuffed up with stool, leading to a blockage.

21. Bunged up

This term is used to describe a feeling of being constipated or having difficulty passing stool. It refers to the sensation of having a blockage in the digestive system.

  • For example, someone might say, “I ate too much cheese last night and now I’m all bunged up.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might complain, “I’ve been bunged up for days and it’s really uncomfortable.”
  • In a conversation about digestive issues, one might ask, “Do you have any tips for getting unbunged?”

22. Constipated AF

This phrase is an abbreviation of “Constipated as f**k” and is used to emphasize the severity of constipation. It conveys a strong sense of discomfort and frustration.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I haven’t been able to go to the bathroom in a week. I’m constipated AF.”
  • A person describing their symptoms might say, “I feel bloated, gassy, and constipated AF.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might joke, “I’m so constipated AF that I’m considering starring in a Western movie.”

23. Turtle head

This term describes the appearance of a small piece of stool sticking out of the anus. It is often used to indicate that a person is constipated and struggling to pass stool.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been on the toilet for an hour and all I’ve got is a turtle head.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might complain, “I hate when I can only pass a turtle head. It’s so frustrating.”
  • In a discussion about digestive health, one might ask, “Is it normal to have turtle heads when you’re constipated?”

24. Prune juice time

This phrase is used to suggest that it is time for someone to drink prune juice, a natural remedy often used to relieve constipation. It implies that the person is constipated and needs to take action.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been constipated for days. It’s prune juice time.”
  • A person suggesting a solution might say, “If you’re feeling bunged up, it’s definitely prune juice time.”
  • In a conversation about natural remedies, one might suggest, “When you’re constipated, try prune juice. It’s prune juice time!”

25. Brick in the belly

This phrase is used to describe the sensation of having a heavy, solid mass in the stomach or abdomen. It conveys the feeling of being weighed down and unable to pass stool.

  • For example, someone might say, “I ate too much bread and now I feel like I have a brick in my belly.”
  • A person describing their discomfort might say, “I’ve been constipated for days and it feels like I have a brick in my belly.”
  • In a conversation about digestive issues, one might ask, “Do you ever feel like you have a brick in your belly when you’re constipated?”

26. Colon congestion

This term refers to the condition where the colon experiences a reduced or slowed down movement of waste material. It is often used to describe constipation.

  • For example, “I’ve been dealing with colon congestion for days and it’s really uncomfortable.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to find a remedy for my colon congestion, it’s causing so much discomfort.”
  • Another person might ask, “Has anyone tried any natural remedies for colon congestion?”

27. Poop plug

This slang term refers to a blockage or obstruction in the rectum that prevents the normal passage of stool. It is often used to describe severe constipation.

  • For instance, “I feel like I have a poop plug and can’t seem to pass anything.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a way to remove this poop plug, it’s causing a lot of pain.”
  • Someone might ask, “Does anyone have any tips on how to prevent a poop plug?”

28. Poop dam

This slang term refers to an obstruction or blockage in the digestive system that prevents the normal flow of stool. It is often used to describe constipation.

  • For example, “I feel like I have a poop dam and it’s preventing anything from coming out.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a way to break down this poop dam and get some relief.”
  • Someone might ask, “What are some effective ways to prevent a poop dam?”

29. Poo-pileup

This slang term refers to the accumulation or buildup of stool in the rectum or colon, resulting in constipation. It is often used to describe a situation where stool is not being passed regularly.

  • For instance, “I’ve been dealing with a poo-pileup and it’s really uncomfortable.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a way to clear this poo-pileup and get some relief.”
  • Someone might ask, “What are some effective ways to prevent a poo-pileup?”

30. Blocked up

This term refers to the condition of having an obstructed or blocked bowel movement, often resulting in constipation. It is a general slang term used to describe the feeling of being unable to pass stool.

  • For example, “I haven’t been able to go to the bathroom for days, I feel completely blocked up.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a way to clear my system, I’ve been blocked up for too long.”
  • Someone might ask, “What are some remedies for being blocked up?”

31. Stymied

This term refers to being unable to progress or move forward, similar to how constipation can block the normal flow of waste through the digestive system.

  • For example, “I was stymied by a difficult math problem.”
  • A person might say, “I feel stymied in my career, like I’m not making any progress.”
  • Another might say, “I feel mentally stymied, like I can’t think clearly.”

32. Gridlocked

This term is often used to describe a situation where traffic is at a standstill and no progress can be made, similar to how constipation can cause a blockage in the intestines.

  • For instance, “The highway was gridlocked during rush hour.”
  • A person might say, “I feel gridlocked in my relationship, like we can’t move forward.”
  • Another might say, “I feel emotionally gridlocked, like I can’t express my true feelings.”

33. Brick in the gut

This phrase describes the sensation of having a heavy or uncomfortable feeling in the stomach, similar to how constipation can cause discomfort in the gut.

  • For example, “After eating that huge meal, I felt like I had a brick in my gut.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been constipated for days, and it feels like I have a brick in my gut.”
  • Another might say, “The stress from work is giving me a constant brick-in-the-gut feeling.”

34. Gut congestion

This term refers to the sensation of having a blockage or congestion in the gut, similar to how constipation can cause a backup of waste in the intestines.

  • For instance, “After eating too much junk food, I felt a sense of gut congestion.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been dealing with gut congestion for weeks, and it’s really uncomfortable.”
  • Another might say, “Certain foods can cause gut congestion and make digestion difficult.”

35. Colon blockade

This term specifically refers to a complete blockage of the colon, which can be caused by severe constipation or other medical conditions.

  • For example, “The patient was rushed to the hospital with a colon blockade.”
  • A doctor might say, “A colon blockade requires immediate medical intervention to prevent serious complications.”
  • Another might say, “Severe constipation can lead to a colon blockade if left untreated.”

36. Fecal impaction

Fecal impaction refers to a condition where a hard mass of stool gets stuck in the rectum or colon, making it difficult to pass. It can cause severe constipation and discomfort.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient is experiencing fecal impaction and will require treatment to remove the blockage.”
  • A person experiencing fecal impaction might complain, “I have been feeling bloated and unable to have a bowel movement for days.”
  • In a discussion about digestive health, someone might ask, “What are the common causes of fecal impaction?”

37. Intestinal obstruction

Intestinal obstruction is a condition where there is a blockage in the intestines, preventing the passage of food and stool. It can lead to constipation, abdominal pain, and other digestive issues.

  • For instance, a doctor might diagnose a patient with intestinal obstruction based on their symptoms and imaging tests.
  • Someone experiencing intestinal obstruction might describe their pain as, “It feels like something is blocking my stomach.”
  • In a conversation about digestive disorders, one might ask, “What are the common signs of intestinal obstruction?”

38. Bowel congestion

Bowel congestion refers to a state where the bowels are not moving properly, resulting in difficulty passing stool. It can cause constipation and discomfort.

  • For example, a person experiencing bowel congestion might say, “I feel like my bowels are congested and nothing is coming out.”
  • In a discussion about digestive health, someone might ask, “What are the common causes of bowel congestion?”
  • A doctor might advise a patient with bowel congestion to increase their fiber intake and drink plenty of water.
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39. Rectal blockage

Rectal blockage occurs when something obstructs the rectum, making it difficult to pass stool. It can cause constipation and discomfort.

  • For instance, a doctor might diagnose a patient with rectal blockage based on their symptoms and a physical examination.
  • Someone experiencing rectal blockage might complain, “I feel like there is something blocking my rectum.”
  • In a conversation about digestive issues, one might ask, “What are the common treatments for rectal blockage?”

40. Digestive traffic jam

Digestive traffic jam is a playful term used to describe a situation where the digestion process is slow or stagnant, resulting in constipation. It refers to the idea of traffic congestion, where things are not flowing smoothly.

  • For example, someone experiencing constipation might say, “I feel like I have a digestive traffic jam going on.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about digestive health, one might joke, “My digestion is stuck in a traffic jam, I need some fiber to clear the road.”
  • A doctor might explain to a patient, “Digestive traffic jam can occur due to various factors, such as a low-fiber diet or certain medications.”

41. Bowel backup

This term refers to a condition where the bowels are backed up, resulting in difficulty or inability to pass stool. It implies a blockage or obstruction in the digestive system.

  • For example, “I haven’t been able to go to the bathroom in days. I think I have a bowel backup.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might say, “I feel so uncomfortable because of this bowel backup.”
  • A doctor discussing digestive issues might use the term, “Bowel backup can lead to various complications if not addressed.”

42. Stool stoppage

This slang term denotes a situation where the passage of stool is hindered or halted. It suggests a complete or partial obstruction in the digestive system, preventing the normal flow of waste.

  • For instance, “I’ve been dealing with stool stoppage for a week now. It’s incredibly frustrating.”
  • A person experiencing constipation might say, “I need to find a solution for this stool stoppage.”
  • A doctor discussing digestive health might explain, “Stool stoppage can occur due to various factors, such as a lack of fiber or dehydration.”

43. Gut blockage

This term refers to a condition where the intestines are blocked or obstructed, leading to difficulty in passing stool. It implies a physical barrier within the digestive system that prevents the normal movement of waste.

  • For example, “I’m experiencing gut blockage and it’s causing me a lot of discomfort.”
  • A person discussing digestive issues might say, “I suspect I have a gut blockage because of my symptoms.”
  • A doctor diagnosing constipation might mention, “Gut blockage can be caused by various factors, including a tumor or severe constipation.”