Top 27 Slang For Contingent – Meaning & Usage

The world of slang is ever-evolving, and staying up-to-date is crucial for blending in with the cool crowd. Curious about the latest slang for “contingent”? Look no further! Our team has scoured the depths of internet culture to bring you a curated list of the trendiest and most current terms. Get ready to upgrade your lingo game and impress your friends with our comprehensive guide.

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1. Contingent

This term refers to a group of individuals who work together on a specific task or project. It can also refer to a team or unit of people with a common purpose or goal.

  • For example, “The film crew worked tirelessly to capture the perfect shot.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might say, “My crew and I completed the mission successfully.”
  • A group of friends organizing an event might say, “We need a crew to help set up and manage the event.”

2. Crew

This term typically refers to a small group of people who work together closely, often in a military or law enforcement context. It can also be used more generally to describe a tight-knit group of friends or colleagues.

  • For instance, “The police squad quickly responded to the emergency call.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Our squad has been training hard for the upcoming match.”
  • A group of friends might say, “Our squad always has a great time when we go out together.”

3. Squad

This term refers to a group of individuals who work together to achieve a common goal. It is often used in sports, but can also be applied to any group working together towards a shared objective.

  • For example, “The basketball team won the championship with their strong teamwork.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “Our team successfully completed the project ahead of schedule.”
  • A group of volunteers might say, “Join our team and make a difference in the community.”

4. Team

This term typically refers to a close-knit group of friends or associates who stick together and support each other. It can also be used to describe a group of people who come together for a specific purpose or activity.

  • For instance, “The posse of friends always has each other’s backs.”
  • In a law enforcement context, a sheriff might say, “We assembled a posse to track down the fugitive.”
  • A group of activists might say, “Join our posse and fight for social justice.”

5. Gang

A group of individuals who come together for a common purpose or activity. “Gang” is often associated with criminal activities, but it can also refer to a close-knit group of friends or colleagues.

  • For instance, a teenager might say, “I’m going out with my gang tonight.”
  • In a discussion about street culture, someone might mention, “Gangs often use specific symbols and colors to identify themselves.”
  • A person talking about their work team might say, “I have a great gang of coworkers who always have my back.”

6. Unit

A small group of people who work together as a cohesive team. “Unit” can refer to a military squad, a police team, or any other organized group with a specific objective.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I’m proud to serve in this elite unit.”
  • In a conversation about law enforcement, someone might mention, “The SWAT unit is highly trained for high-risk situations.”
  • A person discussing their sports team might say, “Our unit has excellent teamwork and communication.”

7. Collective

A gathering or association of individuals who come together for a common purpose, often with shared resources and decision-making. “Collective” emphasizes the idea of working together as a group rather than as individuals.

  • For instance, an artist might say, “Our collective organizes art exhibitions to promote local talent.”
  • In a discussion about worker rights, someone might mention, “Collective bargaining allows employees to negotiate with their employers.”
  • A person talking about a community initiative might say, “The collective effort of volunteers made this event a success.”

8. Band

A small organization or team of people who collaborate on a specific project or activity. “Band” can refer to a musical group, a group of performers, or any other group of individuals working together.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I’m part of a band that plays rock music.”
  • In a conversation about theater, someone might mention, “The band provides live music during the performance.”
  • A person discussing a group project might say, “Our band of volunteers worked tirelessly to complete the task.”

9. Tribe

A close-knit group of people who share common interests, values, or cultural background. “Tribe” often implies a strong sense of belonging and loyalty within the group.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I found my tribe when I joined this hiking club.”
  • In a discussion about indigenous cultures, someone might mention, “Each tribe has its own unique traditions and customs.”
  • A person talking about their group of friends might say, “We’re like a tribe, always supporting and looking out for each other.”

10. Clan

A close-knit group of people who share a common interest or goal. “Clan” is often used to describe a group that has a strong sense of loyalty and camaraderie.

  • For example, a group of friends who always hang out together might refer to themselves as a “clan.”
  • In online gaming, players who form a team and play together regularly might call themselves a “clan.”
  • A person talking about their family might say, “We’re a tight-knit clan, always there for each other.”

11. Clique

A small, exclusive group of people who share similar interests or social status. “Clique” often carries a negative connotation, implying that the group is closed off and unwelcoming to outsiders.

  • For instance, high school students who hang out together and exclude others might be referred to as a “clique.”
  • In a workplace, a group of colleagues who always have lunch together and gossip might be seen as a “clique.”
  • A person discussing social dynamics might say, “Cliques can be exclusionary and create a sense of division in a community.”

12. Faction

A subgroup within a larger group that holds different beliefs or opinions. “Faction” often implies a sense of division or conflict within the larger group.

  • For example, within a political party, there might be different factions that have distinct ideologies.
  • In a video game, players who align themselves with different factions might compete against each other.
  • A person discussing a disagreement within a community might say, “The factional divide has caused tension and hindered progress.”

13. Troop

A group of people, typically soldiers, who are organized and work together as a unit. “Troop” is often used to refer to a military unit or a group of scouts.

  • For instance, a platoon of soldiers might be referred to as a “troop.”
  • In scouting, a group of scouts who go on camping trips together might be called a “troop.”
  • A person discussing military operations might say, “The troop successfully completed their mission.”

14. Ensemble

A group of individuals who come together to perform or create something, often in the arts. “Ensemble” emphasizes the collaborative nature of the group.

  • For example, a group of musicians who play together in a band might be called an “ensemble.”
  • In theater, a group of actors who work together on a production might be referred to as an “ensemble cast.”
  • A person discussing a group project might say, “Each member of the ensemble brought their unique skills and talents to the table.”

15. Company

In the context of a contingent, “company” refers to a group of people who work together or share a common purpose. It can also be used to describe a military unit.

  • For example, “Our company is responsible for managing the event logistics.”
  • In a military setting, someone might say, “I served in Bravo Company during my time in the army.”
  • A business owner might say, “My company specializes in providing IT solutions for small businesses.”

16. Mob

In the context of a contingent, “mob” is used to describe a group of people who are united for a specific purpose or cause. It can also refer to a criminal organization or gang.

  • For instance, “The mob gathered outside the courthouse to protest the verdict.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might say, “The mob has a strong presence in this city.”
  • A news report might mention, “The police arrested several members of a local mob involved in drug trafficking.”

17. Contingency

A “contingency” refers to a possible future event or circumstance that is uncertain or unpredictable. In the context of a contingent, it can also mean a backup plan or alternative course of action.

  • For example, “We need to have a contingency in case it rains during the outdoor event.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s discuss the contingency plans for potential supply chain disruptions.”
  • A project manager might ask, “Have you considered all possible contingencies for this project?”

18. Circle

In the context of a contingent, “circle” is used to describe a group of people who are connected or associated with each other. It can also refer to a close-knit social or professional network.

  • For instance, “She is part of the inner circle of the company’s leadership.”
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, someone might say, “It’s important to have a supportive circle of friends.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can I join your circle for the team building activity?”

19. Brigade

In the context of a contingent, “brigade” refers to a large group or team of people with a specific purpose or role. It is often used in a military context to describe a unit of soldiers.

  • For example, “The fire department dispatched a brigade to tackle the forest fire.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “Our team is known as the ‘goal-scoring brigade’.”
  • A project manager might assign tasks to different brigades within the organization for a specific project.
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20. Regiment

A regiment is a military unit composed of several battalions and commanded by a colonel. It is typically part of a larger division or brigade.

  • For example, “The 101st Airborne Division includes several regiments of highly trained soldiers.”
  • In a discussion about military strategy, one might say, “The regiment played a crucial role in securing the enemy’s flank.”
  • A soldier might mention, “I served in the 3rd Infantry Regiment during my time in the army.”

21. Battalion

A battalion is a military unit typically consisting of four to six companies and commanded by a lieutenant colonel. It is smaller than a regiment but larger than a company or platoon.

  • For instance, “The 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment is an elite special operations unit.”
  • In a discussion about military tactics, one might say, “The battalion was responsible for holding the line during the battle.”
  • A veteran might mention, “I served in the 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines during my deployment.”

22. Platoon

A platoon is a military unit typically consisting of two or more squads and commanded by a lieutenant. It is smaller than a company but larger than a squad.

  • For example, “The platoon was tasked with conducting reconnaissance missions behind enemy lines.”
  • In a discussion about basic training, one might say, “I was assigned to the 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company.”
  • A soldier might mention, “The platoon worked together to complete the objective.”

23. Division

A division is a large military unit typically consisting of three or more brigades and commanded by a major general. It is larger than a regiment and typically operates independently in combat.

  • For instance, “The 1st Infantry Division played a significant role in the invasion of Normandy during World War II.”
  • In a discussion about military organization, one might say, “The division is made up of thousands of soldiers from various units.”
  • A veteran might mention, “I served in the 10th Mountain Division during my time in the army.”

24. Pack

In military slang, “pack” refers to a group of soldiers or military personnel. It is a colloquial term often used informally to refer to a unit or team.

  • For example, “The recon pack was responsible for gathering intelligence on enemy positions.”
  • In a discussion about military camaraderie, one might say, “I’ve got your back, pack.”
  • A soldier might mention, “Our pack trained together for months before deployment.”

25. Squadron

A term used to refer to a group of military aircraft or ships operating together under a single commander. It can also be used more broadly to describe any organized group of individuals working together towards a common goal.

  • For example, in a military context, a pilot might say, “Our squadron completed a successful mission.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our sales squadron is working hard to meet our targets.”
  • A sports team might refer to themselves as a “winning squadron” after a victory.
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26. Coalition

A temporary alliance or partnership between two or more groups, organizations, or countries with the goal of achieving a common objective. It often involves pooling resources, sharing information, and coordinating efforts.

  • For instance, in politics, different political parties might form a coalition to gain a majority in government.
  • In a business context, companies might form a coalition to collaborate on a specific project or initiative.
  • In a military context, multiple countries might form a coalition to address a shared security threat.

27. Alliance

A formal or informal agreement between two or more parties to work together towards a common goal. It often involves mutual support, cooperation, and shared resources.

  • For example, in international relations, countries might form alliances for defense or economic purposes.
  • In a business context, companies might form strategic alliances to expand their market reach or share technology.
  • In a gaming context, players might form alliances to collaborate and compete against other players or groups.