Top 37 Slang For Conveys – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying current with the latest lingo, keeping up with the ever-evolving world of conveys can be a challenge. But fear not, our team is here to guide you through the maze of trendy terms and expressions. Get ready to level up your slang game with our handpicked selection of top slang for conveys that will have you speaking like a pro in no time!

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1. Spill the tea

This slang phrase is used to encourage someone to reveal juicy or scandalous information. It can also be used to describe someone who has shared such information.

  • For example, “Come on, spill the tea! What really happened at the party last night?”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t believe she spilled the tea about her ex-boyfriend.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might ask, “Did you hear? They spilled the tea on that famous couple’s breakup.”

2. Dish the dirt

Similar to “spill the tea,” this slang phrase is used to encourage someone to share gossip or reveal embarrassing details about someone else.

  • For instance, “She loves to dish the dirt on her coworkers.”
  • A reality TV show might promise, “Tonight, we’re dishing the dirt on all the drama that went down.”
  • In a conversation about a messy breakup, a friend might say, “I can’t wait to dish the dirt on what really happened.”

3. Shoot the breeze

This slang phrase is used to describe engaging in casual or idle conversation without a specific purpose or agenda.

  • For example, “Let’s grab a coffee and shoot the breeze.”
  • Two friends might say, “We spent the whole afternoon shooting the breeze at the park.”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might suggest, “We should get together and shoot the breeze over some drinks.”

4. Fill in the blanks

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to provide more details or to complete missing information in a story or explanation.

  • For instance, “Can you fill in the blanks about what happened after I left?”
  • A teacher might ask, “Can someone fill in the blanks on the next step in the equation?”
  • In a conversation about a movie plot, someone might say, “I didn’t quite understand the ending. Can you fill in the blanks?”

5. Let the cat out of the bag

This slang phrase is used to describe accidentally or intentionally revealing information that was meant to be kept secret or surprise.

  • For example, “I can’t believe you let the cat out of the bag about the surprise party!”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t let the cat out of the bag, but I heard there might be a promotion coming.”
  • In a discussion about a movie twist, someone might say, “They really let the cat out of the bag with that trailer.”

6. Lay it on me

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the details or information they have on a particular topic or situation. It is often used when someone wants to be fully informed or updated on something.

  • For example, if a friend has some juicy gossip, you might say, “Lay it on me!”
  • In a business meeting, if someone has important information to share, they might say, “Alright, here’s the latest update. Lay it on me.”
  • If someone has a story to tell, you can say, “I’m all ears. Lay it on me!”

7. Give me the lowdown

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a summary or explanation of a situation or topic. It is often used when someone wants to get a quick understanding of something.

  • For instance, if you want to know what happened at a party you missed, you can ask a friend, “Give me the lowdown.”
  • In a work setting, if a colleague attended a meeting you couldn’t make it to, you might say, “Hey, give me the lowdown on what happened.”
  • If someone is explaining a complex concept, you can ask them, “Can you give me the lowdown in simple terms?”

8. Break it down for me

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain a complex or difficult concept in a way that is easy to understand. It is often used when someone is having trouble grasping a concept and needs a simplified explanation.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complicated math problem, you can say, “Can you break it down for me?”
  • In a technical discussion, if someone is using jargon or technical terms, you might ask them, “Can you break it down for me in layman’s terms?”
  • If someone is giving a presentation with complex information, you can request, “Can you break it down for me step by step?”

9. Clue me in

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or details about something that the speaker is unaware of. It is often used when someone wants to be filled in on a situation or topic.

  • For instance, if a friend is talking about an inside joke you don’t understand, you can say, “Clue me in!”
  • In a work setting, if your colleagues are discussing a project you’re not familiar with, you might ask, “Can someone clue me in on what’s going on?”
  • If someone is talking about a recent news event and you’re not up to date, you can request, “Clue me in on what happened.”

10. Put me in the loop

This phrase is used to ask someone to include the speaker in a group or conversation where important information is being shared. It is often used when someone wants to be kept updated on a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if your colleagues are discussing a project and you want to be involved, you can say, “Put me in the loop.”
  • In a family setting, if your siblings are making plans and you want to be included, you might say, “Don’t forget to put me in the loop.”
  • If a friend is organizing a gathering and you want to stay informed about the details, you can request, “Put me in the loop so I know what’s going on.”

11. Break the ice

This phrase is used to describe the act of initiating a conversation or interaction with someone in order to make them feel more comfortable or at ease. It is often used in social settings or when meeting new people.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “I’ll go over and break the ice with the new neighbors.”
  • In a business meeting, a team leader might suggest, “Let’s start with a quick icebreaker to break the ice and get everyone talking.”
  • A shy person might ask for advice, “How do I break the ice with someone I’m interested in?”

12. Let me in on it

This phrase is used to request that someone includes you or shares information about something that is currently unknown or secret to you. It is often used when there is a conversation or situation happening that you are not aware of.

  • For instance, if two friends are whispering and you want to be included, you might say, “Hey, let me in on it. What are you guys talking about?”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “What’s going on? Let me in on it.”
  • A person might express frustration, “Why does everyone know what’s happening except me? Let me in on it!”

13. Share the deets

This phrase is used to ask someone to share or provide more information or details about something. It is a casual way of requesting additional information.

  • For example, if a friend mentions they went on a date, you might say, “Ooh, share the deets! How did it go?”
  • When discussing a party, someone might ask, “Who’s hosting? Share the deets with me.”
  • A person might express curiosity, “I heard there’s a surprise. Can you share the deets?”

14. Tell me everything

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide you with all the information or details about a certain topic or situation. It is a way of expressing a desire to know everything there is to know.

  • For instance, if a friend mentions they have exciting news, you might say, “Tell me everything! I want to know all the details.”
  • When discussing a movie, someone might say, “I haven’t seen it yet. Tell me everything, but no spoilers!”
  • A person might express enthusiasm, “You went on vacation? Tell me everything! I want to hear all about it.”

15. Give me the 411

This phrase is used to request information or updates about a particular topic. It is a casual way of asking for details or the latest news.

  • For example, if someone mentions a party, you might say, “Give me the 411. When and where is it?”
  • When discussing a celebrity gossip, someone might ask, “What’s the latest? Give me the 411 on that scandal.”
  • A person might express curiosity, “I heard there’s a new restaurant in town. Give me the 411. Is it worth checking out?”

16. Fill me in on the details

This phrase is used when someone wants to be fully informed or updated on a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone missed a meeting, they might say, “Can you fill me in on the details?”
  • In a conversation about a new project, someone might ask, “Can you fill me in on the details of that proposal?”
  • If someone is unsure about the latest gossip, they might say, “I heard there’s some drama. Can you fill me in on the details?”

17. Break it to me gently

This phrase is used when someone wants to be informed about something bad or unpleasant in a sensitive and considerate manner.

  • For instance, if someone has to deliver bad news, they might say, “I have something to tell you, but I’ll break it to you gently.”
  • In a conversation about a breakup, someone might say, “I need to break it to him gently that it’s over.”
  • If someone is about to hear criticism, they might request, “Can you break it to me gently?”

18. Lay the facts on me

This phrase is used when someone wants to hear the truth or wants to be fully informed about a particular situation.

  • For example, if someone suspects someone is lying, they might say, “Lay the facts on me.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I want to hear both sides. Lay the facts on me.”
  • If someone wants to know all the details of a story, they might ask, “Can you lay the facts on me?”

19. Drop some knowledge

This phrase is used when someone wants to share interesting or valuable information with others.

  • For instance, if someone has a fun fact to share, they might say, “Let me drop some knowledge on you.”
  • In a conversation about history, someone might say, “I’m about to drop some knowledge about World War II.”
  • If someone wants to impress others with their expertise, they might say, “Watch me drop some knowledge about astrophysics.”

20. Let me in on the secret

This phrase is used when someone wants to be included in the sharing of a secret or wants to know a secret that others are aware of.

  • For example, if a group of friends is discussing something secretive, someone might say, “Come on, let me in on the secret.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might say, “I won’t tell anyone. Just let me in on the secret.”
  • If someone suspects others are keeping something from them, they might say, “I know you’re hiding something. Let me in on the secret.”

21. Share the scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to share or provide the latest information or news. It implies that the person has exclusive or insider knowledge.

  • For example, a friend might ask, “Hey, share the scoop on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a workplace setting, a colleague might say, “Can you share the scoop on the upcoming project?”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have any scoops on the new restaurant in town?”

22. Tell me what’s up

This phrase is used to ask someone to inform or update you about the current situation or what is happening.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Hey, tell me what’s up with your new job.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “So, tell me what’s up with your love life?”
  • A colleague might say, “Tell me what’s up with the client meeting scheduled for tomorrow.”

23. Give me the inside track

This phrase is used to request exclusive information or insights that are not widely known.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Give me the inside track on the best places to eat in this city.”
  • In a business context, someone might ask, “Can you give me the inside track on the competitor’s new product launch?”
  • A sports fan might ask, “Do you have the inside track on the team’s strategy for the upcoming game?”

24. Let me in on the gossip

This phrase is used to ask someone to share the latest rumors or chitchat with you.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Come on, let me in on the gossip about what’s happening with our mutual friends.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Can you let me in on the gossip about the celebrities at the party?”
  • A colleague might say, “Let me in on the office gossip. I feel like I’m missing out on important information.”

25. Give me the skinny

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide you with the essential or important details of a situation or topic.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Give me the skinny on the new movie everyone is talking about.”
  • In a work setting, someone might ask, “Can you give me the skinny on the new project requirements?”
  • A student might ask, “Give me the skinny on the upcoming exam. What should I focus on?”

26. Let me know what’s going on

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or updates on a situation or event. It implies that the speaker wants to stay informed about the current happenings.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Let me know what’s going on with the party tonight.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you let me know what’s going on with the project deadline?”
  • Someone might text a friend, “Hey, let me know what’s going on with that concert next week.”

27. Give me the rundown

This expression is used to ask someone to give a comprehensive summary or explanation of a situation or topic. It implies that the speaker wants to be fully informed about the subject.

  • For instance, a manager might say to an employee, “Can you give me the rundown on the new project?”
  • When discussing a TV show, someone might ask, “Can you give me the rundown on the latest episode?”
  • A friend might say, “I missed the meeting yesterday, can you give me the rundown on what was discussed?”

28. Let me in on the story

This phrase is used to ask someone to include the speaker in a story or provide them with all the information about a particular event or situation.

  • For example, if friends are talking about a funny incident that happened, someone might say, “Let me in on the story, what happened?”
  • When discussing a gossip or rumor, someone might ask, “Can you let me in on the story about what happened between them?”
  • A person might say, “I heard you went on a trip, let me in on the story!”

29. Hit me up with the deets

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide specific or additional information about a topic or event. It implies that the speaker wants to know all the details.

  • For instance, if someone is talking about a party, someone might say, “Hit me up with the deets, like the time and location.”
  • When discussing a new restaurant, someone might ask, “Can you hit me up with the deets on the menu?”
  • A friend might text, “I heard you’re going on vacation, hit me up with the deets!”

30. Let me know the 411

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide the essential or relevant information about a particular topic or situation. It implies that the speaker wants to be updated with the latest news or details.

  • For example, if someone is talking about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “Let me know the 411 on what happened.”
  • When discussing a new product release, someone might ask, “Can you let me know the 411 on the features and pricing?”
  • A friend might say, “I heard you have some exciting news, let me know the 411!”

31. Fill me in on the deets

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary information or updates about a particular topic or situation. “Deets” is a shortened form of “details”.

  • For example, if someone missed a meeting, they might ask a colleague, “Can you fill me in on the deets?”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “I heard it was really fun. Can you fill me in on the deets?”
  • A friend might ask, “So, what happened last night? Fill me in on the deets.”

32. Tell me the skinny

This phrase is used to ask someone to share the essential or important details about a situation or topic. “Skinny” is a slang term that means the inside information or the important facts.

  • For instance, if someone is gossiping about a friend, they might ask, “Tell me the skinny on what happened between them.”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might say, “I heard the food there is amazing. Tell me the skinny.”
  • A person might ask their coworker, “I heard we have a new project. Can you tell me the skinny?”

33. Share the details

This phrase is a straightforward way of asking someone to provide all the necessary or relevant information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a recent trip, they might say, “Share the details of your adventure.”
  • In a conversation about a work project, a colleague might ask, “Can you share the details of the new initiative?”
  • A friend might ask, “You mentioned something exciting earlier. Share the details!”

34. Let me in on the news

This phrase is used to ask someone to share the most recent or up-to-date information or news about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone missed a family gathering, they might ask, “Let me in on the news. What happened?”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “I heard there’s some juicy gossip. Let me in on the news.”
  • A friend might ask, “I haven’t been following the news lately. Let me in on what’s been happening.”

35. Fill me in on the story

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary information or updates about a particular story or situation.

  • For example, if someone missed a movie, they might ask a friend, “Can you fill me in on the story?”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “I heard it has an interesting plot. Fill me in on the story.”
  • A person might ask their coworker, “I missed the meeting. Can you fill me in on the story?”

36. Give me the inside scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to share secret or inside information about a particular situation or event.

  • For example, if someone is gossiping about a celebrity, they might say, “Hey, give me the inside scoop on their new relationship.”
  • In a conversation about a company’s upcoming product launch, someone might ask, “Can you give me the inside scoop on what they’re planning?”
  • A journalist might say, “I need someone to give me the inside scoop on the political scandal.”

37. Let me in on the details

This phrase is used to ask someone to share all the specific details or information about a particular topic or event.

  • For instance, if someone is discussing a party they attended, they might say, “Let me in on the details, who else was there?”
  • In a conversation about a recent vacation, someone might ask, “Let me in on the details of your trip, where did you stay?”
  • A friend might say, “I heard you’re planning a surprise party, let me in on the details so I can help.”
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