Top 83 Slang For Correct – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, it can be hard to keep up with the latest slang and trendy words. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered. If you’ve ever struggled to find the right word to describe something as “correct,” then this listicle is for you. We’ve scoured the depths of the internet to bring you the top slang terms that are all about being right. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with these cool and hip ways to say “correct!”

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1. Accurate

When something is accurate, it means it is correct or precise. It is often used to describe information or measurements that are exact.

  • For example, if someone asks for the accurate time, they are looking for the correct time down to the minute.
  • In a discussion about a scientific study, someone might say, “The results of the experiment were accurate and reliable.”
  • A person might compliment someone’s aim by saying, “Your shot was accurate, right on target.”

2. On point

When something is on point, it means it is exactly right or relevant to the matter at hand. It is often used to describe opinions, statements, or actions that are fitting or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone gives a well-reasoned argument, you might say, “Your analysis is on point.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might comment, “Her outfit is always on point, she really knows how to put together a stylish look.”
  • A person might say, “The comedian’s jokes were on point, they had the whole audience laughing.”

3. Spot on

When something is spot on, it means it is completely accurate or correct. It is often used to emphasize the accuracy or correctness of a statement or observation.

  • For example, if someone makes a prediction that turns out to be true, you might say, “Your prediction was spot on.”
  • In a taste test, someone might say, “This coffee tastes exactly like the one I had in Italy, it’s spot on.”
  • A person might compliment a friend’s imitation by saying, “Your impression of that celebrity is spot on, it sounds just like them.”

When something is right on, it means it is exactly correct or appropriate for the situation. It is often used to express agreement or approval.

  • For instance, if someone suggests a solution that solves a problem perfectly, you might say, “Your idea is right on.”
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might exclaim, “You’re right on! That’s exactly what we need to do.”
  • A person might respond to a friend’s statement by saying, “Right on! I couldn’t agree more.”

5. Dead on

When something is dead on, it means it is precisely accurate or correct. It is often used to emphasize the exactness or correctness of a statement or assessment.

  • For example, if someone guesses the answer to a riddle correctly, you might say, “Your answer is dead on.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s impersonation, someone might comment, “Your impression is dead on, it’s like you’re channeling that person.”
  • A person might compliment a chef’s cooking by saying, “The seasoning on this dish is dead on, it’s perfectly balanced.”

6. On the money

This phrase means that something is exactly right or accurate. It can refer to a statement, prediction, or action that is spot on.

  • For example, if someone guesses the correct answer to a question, you might say, “You’re on the money!”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We need to make sure our financial projections are on the money.”
  • When discussing a successful investment, someone might say, “His stock picks are always on the money.”

7. On the nose

This phrase means that something is exactly right or accurate. It can be used to describe a guess, prediction, or estimation that is spot on.

  • For instance, if someone guesses the exact number of jellybeans in a jar, you might say, “You’re right on the nose!”
  • In a culinary context, a chef might say, “The seasoning is on the nose – not too much, not too little.”
  • When discussing a perfect timing, someone might say, “He arrived at the meeting right on the nose.”

8. On target

This phrase means that something is accurate, precise, or hitting the intended mark. It can refer to a plan, goal, or action that is on track.

  • For example, if someone’s aim is perfect and hits the bullseye, you might say, “You’re right on target!”
  • In a military context, a commander might say, “Our airstrikes were on target and successfully destroyed enemy positions.”
  • When discussing a successful marketing campaign, someone might say, “Our ads were on target and reached the intended audience.”

This phrase means that something is completely fine, correct, or in good working order. It implies that everything is going well or as expected.

  • For instance, if someone asks how you’re feeling and you’re feeling great, you might respond, “I’m right as rain!”
  • In a health context, a doctor might say, “Your test results came back and everything looks right as rain.”
  • When discussing a problem that has been resolved, someone might say, “After fixing the issue, everything is now right as rain.”

10. All good

This phrase means that everything is fine, correct, or in order. It is often used to indicate that there are no problems or issues.

  • For example, if someone asks if you need any help and you don’t, you might respond, “No, I’m all good!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Don’t worry about it, everything is all good.”
  • When confirming that a task has been completed, someone might say, “I finished the report, so we’re all good.”

11. A-okay

The term “A-okay” is used to indicate that everything is fine or in order. It can also be used to express agreement or approval.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you okay?” you can respond with, “I’m A-okay!”
  • A person might say, “The project is A-okay, we’re right on track.”
  • Another might use it to show agreement by saying, “A-okay, let’s go with that plan.”

12. Bang on

When something is “bang on,” it means that it is exactly right or accurate. It can be used to describe a statement, prediction, or action.

  • For instance, if someone says, “You’re bang on with your analysis,” it means they agree that it is accurate.
  • A person might say, “The weather forecast was bang on, it didn’t rain at all.”
  • Another might use it to describe a precise action by saying, “He hit the target bang on with his shot.”

13. Nailed it

When someone “nailed it,” it means they performed or accomplished something perfectly. It is often used to praise someone’s skills or achievements.

  • For example, if someone completes a difficult task flawlessly, you can say, “You nailed it!”
  • A person might say, “She nailed the presentation, everyone was impressed.”
  • Another might use it to acknowledge someone’s success by saying, “You practiced a lot and nailed the performance.”

14. Perfect

The word “perfect” is used to describe something that is completely correct or without flaws. It can be used to express approval, satisfaction, or agreement.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Is this the right answer?” you can respond with, “Yes, it’s perfect!”
  • A person might say, “The timing of his arrival was perfect, just as we needed him.”
  • Another might use it to show agreement by saying, “Perfect, let’s go with that plan.”

15. True

When something is “true,” it means that it is accurate or correct. It can be used to confirm a statement or express agreement.

  • For example, if someone says, “The sky is blue,” you can respond with, “That’s true.”
  • A person might say, “His explanation of the theory is true, I’ve read it before.”
  • Another might use it to show agreement by saying, “True, I agree with your point.”

16. Just right

This phrase means that something is exactly correct or perfectly suited for a particular purpose or situation.

  • For example, if someone asks how much sugar they should add to a recipe, you might say, “Just right, about a tablespoon.”
  • When describing the temperature of a room, you could say, “It’s not too hot or too cold, it’s just right.”
  • If someone compliments your outfit and asks if it’s comfortable, you might respond, “Yes, it’s just right.”

17. On the mark

This phrase means that something is exactly correct or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone correctly predicts the outcome of a game, you might say, “Wow, you were right on the mark.”
  • When discussing a person’s performance in a test, you could say, “She got every answer on the mark.”
  • If someone gives you directions and you arrive at the destination without any issues, you might say, “Your directions were on the mark.”

18. Righteous

This slang term means that something is morally right, just, or morally superior.

  • For example, if someone donates a large sum of money to a charity, you might say, “That’s a righteous act.”
  • When discussing a decision that benefits others and shows fairness, you could say, “The judge made a righteous ruling.”
  • If someone stands up for what they believe in and fights for justice, you might describe them as “righteous.”

19. Legit

This slang term means that something is genuine, authentic, or legitimate.

  • For instance, if someone asks if a product is real, you might respond, “Yes, it’s legit.”
  • When describing a document or ID that is valid and not counterfeit, you could say, “This passport is legit.”
  • If someone tells an unbelievable story and you want to confirm its truth, you might ask, “Is that story legit?”

20. Proper

This slang term means that something is appropriate, correct, or done in the right way.

  • For example, if someone is dressed formally for an event, you might say, “You look proper.”
  • When discussing the correct way to perform a task, you could say, “Make sure you follow the proper procedure.”
  • If someone is behaving in a respectful and well-mannered manner, you might say, “He’s always proper in his interactions.”

21. Okay

This is a casual and informal way of expressing agreement or acceptance. It can also be used to indicate that something is satisfactory or acceptable.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can we meet at 3 pm?”, you might respond, “Okay, that works for me.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think we should go to the beach,” and the other might reply, “Okay, let’s do it.”
  • If someone asks, “Is it okay if I borrow your car?”, you might say, “Sure, okay.”

22. Stone

Used to emphasize that something is completely correct or accurate. It can also be used to show agreement or affirmation.

  • For instance, if someone says, “You’re always late,” you might respond, “That is stone-cold true.”
  • In a discussion, one person might say, “The sky is blue,” and another might reply, “Stone-cold fact.”
  • If someone asks, “Are you sure?”, you might say, “Stone-cold positive.”

23. For sure

An affirmation that something is true or correct. It can also be used to express agreement or certainty.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Will you be there?”, you might respond, “For sure, I wouldn’t miss it.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think we should go shopping,” and the other might reply, “For sure, I need some new clothes.”
  • If someone asks, “Can you finish the project by tomorrow?”, you might say, “For sure, I’ll make it happen.”

Used to indicate that something is completely accurate or true. It can also be used to show agreement or approval.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The answer is 42,” you might respond, “Right on the money.”
  • In a discussion, one person might say, “The sales numbers are up,” and another might reply, “You’re right on the money.”
  • If someone asks, “Did I guess correctly?”, you might say, “Right on the money, you got it.”

25. Accurate AF

An emphatic way of expressing that something is extremely accurate. The acronym “AF” is used as a slang term for “as f***,” which intensifies the meaning.

  • For example, if someone says, “Your description is on point,” you might respond, “Accurate AF.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “The movie was exactly like the book,” and the other might reply, “Accurate AF.”
  • If someone asks, “Did I guess correctly?”, you might say, “Accurate AF, you nailed it.”

26. Bullseye

When someone says “bullseye,” they mean that something is absolutely correct or accurate. It is often used to express agreement or approval.

  • For example, if someone correctly predicts the outcome of a game, you might say, “Bullseye! You got it right!”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “You hit the bullseye with that analysis. It’s spot on.”
  • A person might respond to a suggestion by saying, “Bullseye! That’s exactly what we need to do.”

27. Hit the nail on the head

This phrase means to be exactly right or to accurately identify or describe something. It is often used to acknowledge someone’s accurate statement or observation.

  • For instance, if someone provides the perfect solution to a problem, you might say, “You really hit the nail on the head with that one.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “You hit the nail on the head. That’s exactly how I feel.”
  • A person might compliment someone’s analysis by saying, “You always hit the nail on the head with your insights.”

28. On the button

When someone says something is “on the button,” they mean it is perfectly correct or accurate. It is often used to express agreement or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone gives the correct answer to a question, you might say, “That’s it! You’re on the button.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “You’re on the button with that analysis. It’s exactly what I was thinking.”
  • A person might respond to a suggestion by saying, “On the button! That’s exactly what we should do.”

29. Perfecto

This slang term is a shortened version of the word “perfect” and is used to mean something is completely correct or ideal.

  • For instance, if someone completes a task flawlessly, you might say, “Perfecto! You did an amazing job.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “That’s perfecto! It’s exactly what I was hoping for.”
  • A person might respond to a suggestion by saying, “Perfecto! That’s exactly what we need to do.”

30. Righto

This slang term is a shortened version of the phrase “right-o” and is used to mean something is absolutely correct or accurate.

  • For example, if someone agrees with a statement, they might say, “Righto! You’re absolutely correct.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “You’re righto about that. It’s exactly how it happened.”
  • A person might respond to a suggestion by saying, “Righto! That’s the best course of action.”

31. Aces

When something is “aces,” it means it’s excellent or perfect. It’s often used to express approval or agreement.

  • For example, if someone asks, “How was the movie?” you might respond, “It was aces!”
  • In a conversation about a successful project, someone might say, “We did aces on that presentation.”
  • A friend might compliment your outfit by saying, “You look aces today!”

32. You got it

This phrase is used to acknowledge that you understand or agree with something. It’s a way of confirming that you have received and processed the information.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you pick up some milk from the store?” you can respond, “You got it!”
  • When given instructions, you might say, “I’ll get started right away. You got it.”
  • If someone thanks you for a favor, you can reply, “No problem, you got it!”

33. That’s it

This phrase is used to indicate that something is correct or accurate. It’s a way of affirming a statement or conclusion.

  • For example, if someone explains a concept and you understand, you can say, “Ah, that’s it!”
  • In a conversation about solving a puzzle, someone might exclaim, “That’s it! I figured it out!”
  • If someone summarizes a situation and you agree, you can simply say, “That’s it!”

34. Yup

This is a casual and informal way of saying “yes.” It’s often used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to grab dinner tonight?” you can respond, “Yup!”
  • If someone confirms a plan or arrangement, you might say, “Yup, that works for me.”
  • When someone asks if you understand something, you can reply, “Yup, I got it.”

35. Uh-huh

This is another casual and informal way of saying “yes.” It’s often used in spoken conversations to indicate agreement or understanding.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you enjoy the movie?” you can respond, “Uh-huh!”
  • When someone tells you a story and you’re listening attentively, you might say, “Uh-huh, go on.”
  • If someone asks if you’re ready to leave, you can reply, “Uh-huh, let’s go.”

36. Roger that

This phrase is a military communication term that means “message received and understood.” It is often used to acknowledge an order or instruction.

  • For example, a soldier might respond to a command with, “Roger that, moving out.”
  • In a team setting, someone might say, “Roger that, I’ll take care of it.”
  • During a conversation, one person might say, “I need you to pick up some groceries,” and the other might reply, “Roger that, I’ll stop by the store on my way home.”

37. Absolutely

This word is used to express complete agreement or certainty about something.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the movies tonight?” you might respond, “Absolutely!”
  • In a discussion, one person might say, “The team did a great job on that project,” and another might reply, “Absolutely, they really went above and beyond.”
  • A person might exclaim, “That’s absolutely incredible!” when they are amazed by something.
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38. Indeed

This word is used to emphasize agreement or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone says, “It’s a beautiful day outside,” you might respond, “Indeed, the weather is perfect.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “The movie was fantastic,” and another might reply, “Indeed, I loved every minute of it.”
  • When someone expresses gratitude, you might say, “Indeed, you’re welcome. I’m happy to help.”

39. Affirmative

This word is a formal way of saying “yes” or expressing agreement.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you confirm your attendance at the meeting?” you might respond, “Affirmative.”
  • In a military setting, a soldier might respond to a command with, “Affirmative, moving out.”
  • During a conversation, one person might say, “I need your help with something,” and the other might reply, “Affirmative, what do you need?”

40. You bet

This phrase is a casual way of expressing agreement or certainty.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this task?” you might respond, “You bet!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “The concert is going to be amazing,” and another might reply, “You bet, I can’t wait.”
  • When someone expresses gratitude, you might say, “You bet, anytime. I’m happy to assist.”

41. Absolutely right

When someone is absolutely right, it means they are completely accurate or correct in their statement or opinion.

  • For example, if someone says, “The answer to that question is 15,” and someone else confirms, “Absolutely right!”
  • In a debate, one person might argue, “The government needs to prioritize education,” and another might respond, “Absolutely right, it’s crucial for our future.”
  • A teacher might praise a student by saying, “Your answer is absolutely right, well done!”

42. Dead right

When someone is dead right, it means they are completely correct or accurate in what they are saying.

  • For instance, if someone claims, “The restaurant we’re looking for is on the left,” and another person agrees, “You’re dead right, I see it now.”
  • In a discussion about a movie plot twist, someone might say, “I knew who the killer was from the beginning, I was dead right.”
  • A sports commentator might exclaim, “He predicted the outcome of the game before it even started, he’s dead right!”

43. Exactly

When someone says “exactly,” it means they agree with what has been said or that something is precisely or without deviation.

  • For example, if someone states, “The meeting starts at 9:00 AM,” and another person responds, “Exactly.”
  • In a conversation about a recipe, someone might say, “You need to add one teaspoon of salt,” and another might confirm, “Exactly, that’s the right amount.”
  • A teacher might ask a question and a student could answer, “The capital of France is Paris,” and the teacher might respond, “Exactly, well done!”

44. Totally

When someone says “totally,” it means they agree with what has been said or that something is completely or entirely true.

  • For instance, if someone claims, “I’m exhausted after running a marathon,” and another person responds, “Totally, it’s a challenging feat.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I understand your perspective, but I totally disagree.”
  • A friend might describe a movie by saying, “It’s a comedy, but it’s also totally heartwarming.”

45. Right-o

When someone says “right-o,” it is an enthusiastic affirmation of correctness or agreement with what has been said.

  • For example, if someone suggests, “Let’s go to the beach,” and another person responds, “Right-o, that sounds like a great idea!”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “We should go hiking,” and another might reply, “Right-o, I love being in nature.”
  • A colleague might propose a solution to a problem and another might respond, “Right-o, let’s give it a try!”

46. Yuppers

A playful and informal way of saying “yes.” It is often used to show agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, when asked if they want to go out for dinner, someone might respond, “Yuppers, I’m hungry.”
  • A person might say, “Yuppers, I’ll be there!” when confirming their attendance to an event.
  • When someone asks if they can borrow a pen, another person might reply, “Yuppers, here you go!”

47. You got it, dude

A phrase popularized by the TV show “Full House,” it is used to acknowledge that someone understands or has correctly completed a task.

  • For instance, if someone asks for directions and you provide them, they might say, “You got it, dude!”
  • When someone asks if they can have a slice of pizza, the person serving might say, “You got it, dude.”
  • If a friend asks for a favor and you agree to help, they might respond with, “You got it, dude!”

48. That’s the ticket

An expression used to indicate that something is correct or exactly what is needed or desired.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a specific restaurant and you agree, you might say, “That’s the ticket!”
  • When someone correctly answers a trivia question, another person might say, “That’s the ticket!”
  • If someone suggests a solution to a problem and you think it will work, you could respond with, “That’s the ticket!”

49. That’s the way

A phrase used to confirm that something is correct or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone asks if a certain route is the correct way to get somewhere, you might respond, “That’s the way!”
  • When someone explains a concept and you understand, you might say, “That’s the way!”
  • If someone asks if they can use a specific ingredient in a recipe and you agree, you could say, “That’s the way!”

50. That’s correct

A straightforward way of confirming that something is true or accurate.

  • For example, if someone asks if a certain fact is true and you agree, you might respond, “That’s correct.”
  • When someone provides the correct answer to a question, you might say, “That’s correct!”
  • If someone asks if they pronounced a word correctly and they did, you could simply say, “That’s correct.”

51. That’s right

This phrase is used to indicate that something is accurate or true. It is a simple and straightforward way to affirm the correctness of a statement or fact.

  • For example, if someone says, “The answer is 42,” another person might respond, “That’s right.”
  • In a conversation about a movie plot, one person might say, “The main character is actually a ghost,” and another might reply, “That’s right.”
  • When discussing a historical event, someone might assert, “The battle took place in 1776,” and another might agree, “That’s right.”

52. That’s spot on

This phrase is used to emphasize the accuracy or correctness of something. It implies that the statement or observation is not only correct but also perfectly aligned with the truth or reality.

  • For instance, if someone describes a painting as “vibrant and full of life,” another person might respond, “That’s spot on.”
  • In a discussion about a sports play, someone might say, “The quarterback’s pass was perfectly timed,” and another might agree, “That’s spot on.”
  • When analyzing a scientific theory, one person might assert, “The data supports the hypothesis,” and another might respond, “That’s spot on.”

53. That’s on the money

This phrase is used to indicate that something is precisely accurate or correct. It suggests that the statement or information is not only true but also aligned with the desired outcome or expectation.

  • For example, if someone predicts the outcome of a game and it turns out as expected, another person might say, “That’s on the money.”
  • In a conversation about financial investments, one person might state, “The stock price will rise,” and another might respond, “That’s on the money.”
  • When discussing a recipe, someone might assert, “The secret ingredient is cinnamon,” and another might agree, “That’s on the money.”

54. That’s accurate AF

This phrase is used to emphasize the high level of accuracy of something. The “AF” stands for “as f***,” which intensifies the meaning and adds emphasis to the statement.

  • For instance, if someone provides an analysis that is incredibly precise, another person might say, “That’s accurate AF.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific measurement, one person might state, “The temperature is exactly 25.5 degrees Celsius,” and another might respond, “That’s accurate AF.”
  • When describing a person’s ability to recall details, someone might assert, “Her memory is impeccable,” and another might agree, “That’s accurate AF.”

55. That’s dead on

This phrase is used to emphasize the absolute accuracy or correctness of something. The word “dead” intensifies the meaning and adds emphasis to the statement.

  • For example, if someone describes a person’s personality traits with precision, another person might say, “That’s dead on.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, one person might state, “The treaty was signed on June 15th,” and another might respond, “That’s dead on.”
  • When analyzing a scientific experiment, someone might assert, “The results support the hypothesis,” and another might agree, “That’s dead on.”

56. That’s bang on

This phrase is used to indicate that something is completely accurate or precise.

  • For example, if someone guesses the correct answer to a question, you might say, “That’s bang on!”
  • In a conversation about measurements, someone might say, “I measured it twice, and it’s bang on 5 feet.”
  • If someone perfectly imitates a celebrity’s voice, you might say, “Your impression is bang on!”

57. That’s on the nose

This phrase means that something is exactly correct or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone predicts the outcome of a sports game correctly, you might say, “Your prediction was right on the nose!”
  • In a discussion about a movie’s plot twist, someone might say, “I knew who the killer was right on the nose.”
  • If someone accurately estimates the number of jelly beans in a jar, you might say, “Your guess was on the nose!”

58. That’s a bullseye

This phrase comes from archery and means that something is precisely on target or accurate.

  • For example, if someone solves a difficult puzzle correctly, you might say, “That’s a bullseye!”
  • In a discussion about hitting a golf ball, someone might say, “I hit that shot and it went straight into the hole. It was a bullseye.”
  • If someone perfectly mimics a famous painting, you might say, “Your recreation is a bullseye!”

59. That’s on the mark

This phrase means that something is precisely accurate or correct.

  • For instance, if someone gives an accurate description of a situation, you might say, “That’s right on the mark!”
  • In a conversation about a student’s answer on a test, someone might say, “Your response is on the mark.”
  • If someone accurately predicts the outcome of a political election, you might say, “Your forecast was on the mark!”

60. That’s hitting the nail on the head

This phrase means that someone has identified the main point or issue correctly.

  • For example, if someone explains the cause of a problem accurately, you might say, “You’re hitting the nail on the head!”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, someone might say, “I think your analysis is hitting the nail on the head.”
  • If someone accurately describes your feelings, you might say, “You’ve hit the nail on the head!”

61. That’s right as rain

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is absolutely correct or accurate. It is often used to express certainty or agreement.

  • For example, if someone makes a statement and you agree with it, you might respond, “That’s right as rain.”
  • In a conversation about a fact or piece of information, someone might say, “I checked the data, and it’s right as rain.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion and you strongly agree with their statement, you could say, “You’re absolutely right as rain.”

62. That’s on the button

This phrase means that something is exactly correct or accurate. It is often used to emphasize precision or correctness.

  • For instance, if someone gives you directions and you follow them perfectly, you might say, “I arrived at the destination on the button.”
  • In a discussion about a specific time or deadline, someone might say, “We need to submit the report by 5 PM on the button.”
  • If someone asks if a certain answer is correct and you confirm it, you could say, “That’s on the button, no doubt about it.”

63. That’s perfecto

This phrase is used to indicate that something is absolutely perfect or flawless. It is often used to express satisfaction or admiration.

  • For example, if someone presents you with a well-executed piece of artwork, you might say, “Wow, that’s perfecto.”
  • In a conversation about achieving a goal or completing a task, someone might say, “I followed the instructions exactly, and the result was perfecto.”
  • If someone asks if a certain outcome meets your expectations and it exceeds them, you could say, “It’s not just good, it’s perfecto.”

64. That’s righto

This phrase is used to affirm that something is absolutely right or correct. It is often used to express agreement or approval.

  • For instance, if someone makes a statement that you agree with, you might respond, “That’s righto.”
  • In a discussion about a decision or course of action, someone might say, “We need to proceed in this manner, and that’s righto.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion and you strongly agree with their viewpoint, you could say, “You’re absolutely righto.”

65. That’s aces

This phrase means that something is excellent or perfect. It is often used to express high praise or approval.

  • For example, if someone presents you with a well-prepared meal, you might say, “Wow, that’s aces.”
  • In a conversation about a job or task well done, someone might say, “You handled that project flawlessly. It’s aces.”
  • If someone asks if a certain outcome meets your expectations and it exceeds them, you could say, “It’s not just good, it’s aces.”

66. That’s all good

This phrase is used to indicate that everything is fine or acceptable. It can also be used to show agreement or understanding.

  • For example, if someone asks if it’s okay to bring a friend along, you can respond, “That’s all good.”
  • In a conversation about plans, one person might say, “I can meet you at 7pm.” The other person can reply, “That’s all good with me.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, you can reassure them by saying, “That’s all good, no worries.”

67. You got that right

This expression is used to affirm that someone’s statement or opinion is accurate or true. It is a way of agreeing or acknowledging someone’s correctness.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The movie was amazing,” you can respond, “You got that right!”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, one person might say, “Climate change is a serious issue.” Another person can reply, “You got that right.”
  • If someone makes a bold prediction and you agree, you can say, “You got that right, it’s going to happen.”

68. That’s it exactly

This phrase is used to emphasize that someone’s statement or description is completely accurate or correct. It is a way of affirming their accuracy and agreement.

  • For example, if someone says, “The party was a disaster,” you can respond, “That’s it exactly.”
  • In a conversation about a complex concept, one person might explain it and the other person can say, “That’s it exactly, you nailed it.”
  • If someone gives a detailed account of an event and you agree with their accuracy, you can say, “That’s it exactly, you captured every detail.”

69. That’s exactly right

This phrase is used to confirm that someone’s statement or answer is accurate or true. It is a way of expressing agreement and acknowledging their correctness.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The answer is 42,” you can reply, “That’s exactly right.”
  • In a discussion about a historical fact, one person might state it and the other person can say, “That’s exactly right, I remember reading about that.”
  • If someone provides a clear explanation and you agree with their accuracy, you can say, “That’s exactly right, you explained it perfectly.”

70. That’s absolutely right

This phrase is used to emphasize that someone’s statement or assertion is completely accurate or true. It is a way of strongly affirming their correctness and agreement.

  • For example, if someone says, “The answer is 100% correct,” you can respond, “That’s absolutely right.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, one person might make a strong argument and the other person can say, “That’s absolutely right, I couldn’t agree more.”
  • If someone presents a well-reasoned analysis and you agree with their accuracy, you can say, “That’s absolutely right, your points are spot on.”

71. That’s dead right

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is completely accurate or true. It is often used to show strong agreement or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone says, “The sky is blue,” another person might respond, “That’s dead right!”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I think you’re wrong,” and the other person might reply, “No, that’s dead right.”
  • When discussing a fact, someone might say, “I looked it up, and that’s dead right.”

72. That’s totally right

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is entirely accurate or true. It is often used to show agreement or confirmation.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The movie starts at 7 pm,” another person might respond, “That’s totally right!”
  • In a discussion about a topic, someone might say, “I agree with you, that’s totally right.”
  • When explaining a concept, someone might say, “You understood it perfectly, that’s totally right.”

73. You’re right

This phrase is used to acknowledge that someone’s statement or opinion is accurate. It is often used to show agreement or validation.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think we should take the scenic route,” another person might respond, “You’re right, that sounds like a good idea.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I think you’re mistaken,” and the other person might reply, “No, you’re right.”
  • When discussing a decision, someone might say, “You’re right, we should go with your suggestion.”

74. That’s the right answer

This phrase is used to indicate that a given answer or solution is accurate. It is often used in educational or quiz settings.

  • For instance, if a teacher asks a question and a student provides the correct response, the teacher might say, “That’s the right answer.”
  • In a game show, the host might say, “Congratulations, that’s the right answer!”
  • When solving a puzzle, someone might say, “I think I got it, that’s the right answer.”

75. That’s the correct interpretation

This phrase is used to acknowledge that someone has understood or interpreted something correctly. It is often used in discussions or analyses.

  • For example, if someone analyzes a poem and provides an insightful interpretation, another person might say, “That’s the correct interpretation.”
  • In a book club, someone might say, “I think the author intended this, and that’s the correct interpretation.”
  • When discussing a painting, an art critic might say, “You captured the artist’s intention, that’s the correct interpretation.”

76. Bingo

This term is used to express agreement or confirmation that something is correct.

  • For example, if someone guesses the correct answer to a question, you might say, “Bingo! That’s it!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think the party starts at 8 pm,” and the other might respond, “Bingo! You’re right.”
  • Someone might use this term to indicate that they understand what someone is saying, saying, “Bingo! I get it now.”

77. True dat

This phrase is a colloquial way of expressing agreement or acknowledging that something is correct.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The weather is really nice today,” you might respond, “True dat!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I can’t believe how expensive that restaurant is,” and the other might reply, “True dat. It’s way overpriced.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to show support for a statement, saying, “True dat! I totally agree with you.”

78. Word

This slang term is used to confirm that something is correct or to show agreement with what someone else has said.

  • For example, if someone says, “I just aced my exam,” you might respond with a simple “Word!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “The new album by that band is amazing,” and the other might reply, “Word. I’ve been listening to it non-stop.”
  • Someone might use this term to indicate that they understand and agree with what someone is saying, saying, “Word. I feel the same way.”

79. You’re on the money

This phrase is used to acknowledge that someone’s statement or prediction is accurate or correct.

  • For instance, if someone correctly guesses the outcome of a game, you might say, “You’re on the money!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think the stock market is going to crash tomorrow,” and the other might respond, “You’re on the money. I’ve been seeing the same signs.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to show agreement and support for someone’s accurate assessment, saying, “You’re on the money. Couldn’t have said it better myself.”

80. You hit the nail on the head

This phrase is used to acknowledge that someone’s statement or observation is accurate and precise.

  • For example, if someone correctly identifies the cause of a problem, you might say, “You hit the nail on the head!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think the key to success is consistent hard work,” and the other might reply, “You hit the nail on the head. That’s exactly it.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to show agreement and emphasize the accuracy of someone’s statement, saying, “You hit the nail on the head. Couldn’t have said it better myself.”

81. You’re spotless

This phrase means that someone is completely correct or accurate in what they are saying or doing. It emphasizes that there are no mistakes or errors.

  • For example, if someone solves a difficult math problem correctly, you might say, “Wow, you’re spotless!”
  • In a discussion about a historical fact, someone might say, “You’re spotless, that event did happen in 1920.”
  • If someone gives the correct answer in a quiz, you could say, “You’re spotless, that’s the right answer!”

82. That’s the correct way

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done in the accurate or proper way. It implies that the action or decision is correct and aligns with the expected or desired outcome.

  • For instance, if someone demonstrates the proper technique for a specific exercise, you might say, “That’s the correct way to do it.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, the instructor might say, “Make sure to follow the recipe exactly, that’s the correct way to make this dish.”
  • If someone asks for directions and you confirm their chosen route, you could say, “Yes, that’s the correct way to get there!”

83. You’re right as rain

This phrase means that someone is completely correct or accurate in what they are saying or doing. It compares being right to the reliability and certainty of rain, which is a natural and expected occurrence.

  • For example, if someone accurately predicts the outcome of a sports game, you might say, “You’re right as rain!”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “You’re right as rain, that policy does have a positive impact.”
  • If someone gives the correct answer in a trivia game, you could say, “You’re right as rain, that’s the correct response!”