Top 47 Slang For Express – Meaning & Usage

Expressing oneself can sometimes be a challenge, especially when trying to keep up with the latest slang and trendy phrases. But fear not! We’ve got you covered with a curated list of the top slang for express. From catchy phrases to cool abbreviations, this article is your go-to guide for staying in the know and expressing yourself like a pro. Get ready to up your slang game and leave everyone wondering, “Where did they learn that?”

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1. Drop a line

This phrase is often used when asking someone to contact you or to reach out to someone else.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to drop me a line.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t talked to my old friend in a while. I should drop him a line.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might ask, “Could you drop a line to the client and confirm the meeting?”

2. Give me the lowdown

This phrase is used when asking for a summary or the important details about a situation or topic.

  • For instance, “I’m new here. Can you give me the lowdown on how things work?”
  • A person might say, “I missed the meeting. Can you give me the lowdown on what was discussed?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “What’s the lowdown on the new restaurant in town?”

3. Pop off

This phrase is often used to describe someone speaking out or expressing their thoughts or opinions in a strong or aggressive way.

  • For example, “He really popped off during the meeting and challenged everyone’s ideas.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she popped off at the teacher like that.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might yell, “Don’t pop off at me like that!”

4. Air it out

This phrase is used when someone wants to talk about a problem or resolve a conflict by openly discussing it.

  • For instance, “We need to air out our differences and find a solution.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s air it out and clear the air between us.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might suggest, “If anyone has any concerns, let’s air them out and address them.”

5. Speak your mind

This phrase encourages someone to freely express their thoughts or opinions without any fear of judgment or consequences.

  • For example, “Go ahead and speak your mind. We want to hear what you really think.”
  • A person might say, “I always speak my mind, even if it’s not popular.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might encourage others by saying, “Don’t be afraid to speak your mind. We value everyone’s input.”

6. Let the cat out of the bag

This phrase means to disclose or reveal a secret or confidential information that was meant to be kept hidden.

  • For example, “I accidentally let the cat out of the bag and told Sarah about the surprise party.”
  • A friend might say, “Please don’t let the cat out of the bag, it’s supposed to be a surprise.”
  • In a movie plot, a character might say, “The detective finally let the cat out of the bag and revealed the true identity of the killer.”

7. Get something off your chest

This phrase means to confess or share something that has been weighing heavily on your mind or bothering you.

  • For instance, “I finally got it off my chest and told my friend about the mistake I made.”
  • A person might say, “I need to get something off my chest and talk about what happened.”
  • In a therapy session, a patient might say, “I feel relieved after getting everything off my chest.”

8. Say it like it is

This phrase means to speak in a straightforward and honest manner without sugarcoating or avoiding the truth.

  • For example, “I appreciate that she always says it like it is, even if it’s not what I want to hear.”
  • A friend might say, “Sometimes you just have to say it like it is and be honest with yourself.”
  • In a business meeting, a colleague might say, “Let’s skip the small talk and say it like it is.”

9. Put it into words

This phrase means to express or articulate something in words.

  • For instance, “I’m so overwhelmed with emotions that I can’t even put it into words.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been trying to put it into words, but I can’t find the right ones.”
  • In a creative writing class, a teacher might say, “Your assignment is to take this feeling and put it into words.”

10. Express yourself

This phrase means to convey or communicate your thoughts, feelings, or identity in a way that is true to yourself.

  • For example, “Dance allows me to express myself and let go of any inhibitions.”
  • A friend might say, “You should express yourself and not worry about what others think.”
  • In a therapy session, a therapist might say, “It’s important to find healthy ways to express yourself and process your emotions.”

11. Shoot the breeze

To have a relaxed and informal chat with someone, often about unimportant or trivial topics.

  • For example, “Let’s grab a coffee and shoot the breeze.”
  • Two friends might say, “We haven’t caught up in ages. Let’s meet up and shoot the breeze.”
  • During a break at work, colleagues might gather in the break room to shoot the breeze.
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12. Break it down

To analyze or explain something in a simplified and understandable manner.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Let me break it down for you so you can understand the concept.”
  • A dance instructor might say, “Now, let’s break it down step by step.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might say, “I’m going to break it down into three main points.”

13. Dish it out

To deliver harsh criticism or insults towards someone.

  • For example, “She can dish it out, but she can’t take it.”
  • A friend might say, “I can always count on you to dish it out and make me laugh.”
  • During an argument, someone might say, “Don’t dish it out if you can’t handle it.”

14. Drop some knowledge

To provide useful or enlightening information to others.

  • For instance, “I’m about to drop some knowledge on you about the history of this city.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’m here to drop some knowledge and help you succeed.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “I read an interesting article yesterday. Let me drop some knowledge on you.”

15. Fill me in

To provide someone with the most recent details or information about a particular topic.

  • For example, “I’ve been out of town. Can you fill me in on what I missed?”
  • A colleague might say, “I need you to fill me in on the meeting that happened earlier.”
  • When catching up with a friend, someone might say, “I haven’t talked to you in a while. Fill me in on your life.”

16. Cut to the chase

This phrase means to skip all the unnecessary details and get straight to the main or important part of something.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s cut to the chase and discuss the main issue.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I don’t have much time, so let’s cut to the chase.”
  • A movie reviewer might write, “The film had a slow start, but once it cut to the chase, it became much more engaging.”

17. Give me the scoop

This phrase is used when someone wants to know all the details or inside information about a particular situation or event.

  • For instance, a friend might ask, “Hey, what’s the scoop on the party tonight?”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to interview the witness and get the scoop on the crime.”
  • Someone might comment on a news article, “Thanks for giving us the scoop on this breaking story.”

18. Let me in on the secret

This phrase is used when someone wants to be included or informed about a secret or confidential information.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Come on, let me in on the secret. I promise I won’t tell anyone.”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “I need someone to let me in on the secret to solve this case.”
  • Someone might ask a colleague, “Can you let me in on the secret to your success?”

19. Give me the rundown

This phrase means to give a detailed explanation or summary of something.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “Give me the rundown on the team’s performance in the last game.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “Can you give me the rundown on the new project?”
  • A student might say to a classmate, “I missed the lecture. Can you give me the rundown on what I missed?”

20. Get off your chest

This phrase means to share or confess something that has been weighing on your mind or bothering you.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I need to get something off my chest. Can we talk?”
  • In a therapy session, a patient might say, “I finally got that off my chest, and it feels like a huge weight has been lifted.”
  • Someone might write in a diary, “I use my journal as a way to get things off my chest and process my emotions.”

21. Say it loud and proud

This phrase encourages someone to speak or express their thoughts or opinions without fear or hesitation.

  • For example, if someone is hesitant to share their achievements, you might say, “Don’t be shy, say it loud and proud!”
  • In a discussion about personal beliefs, someone might encourage others by saying, “Don’t hold back, say it loud and proud!”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “If you have something important to say, say it loud and proud!”

22. Get it off your mind

This phrase suggests sharing or expressing something that has been weighing on one’s mind, in order to feel a sense of relief or release.

  • For instance, if someone is constantly thinking about a problem, you might say, “Just get it off your mind and talk about it.”
  • In a conversation about emotional struggles, someone might say, “Sometimes, you just need to get it off your mind and let it out.”
  • A therapist might encourage a patient by saying, “In order to find peace, you need to get it off your mind and express your feelings.”

23. Lay it all on the line

This phrase means to express or reveal everything, without reservation or hesitation.

  • For example, if someone is hesitant to share their true feelings, you might say, “It’s time to lay it all on the line and be honest.”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “Sometimes, you have to lay it all on the line and go for it.”
  • A coach might encourage a team by saying, “In the game, you need to lay it all on the line and give it your all.”

24. Get it out in the open

This phrase suggests bringing something to light or discussing it openly, rather than keeping it hidden or secret.

  • For instance, if there is a conflict within a group, someone might say, “Let’s get it out in the open and address the issue.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, someone might say, “It’s important to get it out in the open and seek support.”
  • A mediator might encourage parties in a dispute by saying, “In order to find a resolution, we need to get it out in the open and have an open dialogue.”

25. Speak from the heart

This phrase means to express oneself honestly and authentically, without holding back or filtering one’s thoughts or emotions.

  • For example, if someone is giving a speech, you might say, “Speak from the heart and let your true feelings show.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “It’s important to speak from the heart and express your love and appreciation.”
  • A mentor might advise a mentee by saying, “When giving advice, speak from the heart and share your personal experiences.”

26. Turbo

This term is used to describe something that is fast or accelerated. It is often used to emphasize the speed or efficiency of a process or action.

  • For example, “I need to turbo through this project to meet the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “This new smartphone has a turbo processor that makes it incredibly fast.”
  • A car enthusiast might comment, “That sports car is equipped with a turbo engine for maximum speed.”

27. Zoom

To “zoom” means to move quickly or rapidly. It can be used to describe physical movement or the speed of a process.

  • For instance, “I need to zoom to the store before it closes.”
  • In a discussion about a fast-paced sport, someone might say, “The players zoomed across the field.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Wow, that car can really zoom!”

28. Blitz

In the context of express, “blitz” refers to an aggressive and swift attack or action. It implies a high level of intensity and speed.

  • For example, “We need to blitz through these tasks to finish on time.”
  • In a sports conversation, someone might say, “The team executed a blitz play to catch the opponent off guard.”
  • A person discussing a marketing strategy might use the term, “Let’s launch a blitz campaign to create buzz.”

29. Dash

To “dash” means to move quickly or hastily. It can be used to describe physical movement or the speed of an action.

  • For instance, “I need to dash to catch my train.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might say, “Add a dash of salt to enhance the flavor.”
  • A person might comment, “She dashed through the crowd to catch the bouquet at the wedding.”

30. Whiz

In the context of express, “whiz” can refer to someone who is an expert or highly skilled in a particular field. It can also be used to describe something that is fast or quick.

  • For example, “He’s a whiz at solving puzzles.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “This computer is a whiz at multitasking.”
  • A person might comment, “She’s a whiz in the kitchen, always whipping up delicious meals in no time.”

31. Zippy

Zippy is a slang term used to describe something that is fast or quick. It can be used to describe a person, object, or action that moves swiftly.

  • For example, “She drove her zippy sports car down the highway.”
  • A person might say, “I need to finish this project zippy, so I can move on to the next one.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s always been zippy on the basketball court, with lightning-fast moves.”

32. Fleet

Fleet is a slang term used to describe something that is swift or nimble. It can refer to a person, vehicle, or animal that moves quickly and with agility.

  • For instance, “The cheetah is known for its fleet speed.”
  • A person might say, “She has a fleet foot and can outrun anyone.”
  • Another might comment, “The fleet car easily weaved through traffic.”

33. Hightail

Hightail is a slang term used to describe the act of hurrying or moving quickly. It can be used to describe a person who is in a rush or trying to escape a situation.

  • For example, “He hightailed it out of there before anyone could catch him.”
  • A person might say, “We need to hightail it to the airport if we want to catch our flight.”
  • Another might comment, “She hightailed out of the office as soon as the clock struck 5.”

34. Scoot

Scoot is a slang term used to describe the act of moving swiftly or hurriedly. It can be used to describe a person, object, or action that moves quickly.

  • For instance, “The child scooted across the playground.”
  • A person might say, “I need to scoot to the store before it closes.”
  • Another might comment, “He scooted past everyone in the race and took first place.”

35. Bolt

Bolt is a slang term used to describe the act of running or moving quickly. It can be used to describe a person, animal, or object that moves rapidly.

  • For example, “The horse bolted out of the gate.”
  • A person might say, “I need to bolt to catch my train.”
  • Another might comment, “He bolted across the field to catch the football.”

36. Zip

To zip means to move quickly or swiftly. It can also refer to the sound made when something moves rapidly.

  • For example, “I need to zip through this report before the meeting.”
  • Someone might say, “The car zipped past me on the highway.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Zip! The ball went right over my head!”

37. Fly

To fly means to be stylish or fashionable. It can also refer to something that is cool or impressive.

  • For instance, “She always knows how to fly in any outfit.”
  • A person might say, “That new phone is so fly.”
  • Someone might comment, “His dance moves are fly!”

38. Rush

To rush means to do something in a hurry or with urgency. It can also refer to a sudden surge of excitement or adrenaline.

  • For example, “I need to rush to catch my flight.”
  • Someone might say, “I felt a rush of adrenaline when I jumped off the cliff.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’m in a rush! I need to finish this project by tomorrow!”

39. Gallop

To gallop means to move or progress quickly. It is often used to describe the fast pace of something.

  • For instance, “The horse galloped across the field.”
  • A person might say, “Time is galloping by. I can’t believe it’s already December!”
  • Someone might comment, “The team’s offense is galloping down the field!”

40. Hustle

To hustle means to work hard or move quickly. It can also refer to making money through various means or engaging in a fast-paced lifestyle.

  • For example, “She hustled to finish all her assignments before the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I need to hustle if I want to succeed in this competitive industry.”
  • Someone might comment, “He’s always hustling, finding new ways to make money.”

41. Tear

This slang term refers to moving quickly or at a high speed.

  • For example, “I tore down the highway to get to the meeting on time.”
  • A person might say, “He tore through the finish line and won the race.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “We tore through the airport to catch our connecting flight.”

42. Dash off

To quickly leave or move away from a place or situation.

  • For instance, “I dashed off to catch the bus before it left.”
  • A person might say, “I have to dash off to a meeting, sorry!”
  • In a conversation about a busy schedule, someone might mention, “I’m always dashing off to different appointments.”

43. Dart

To move or run swiftly in a particular direction.

  • For example, “The squirrel darted across the road.”
  • A person might say, “I darted into the store to grab some snacks.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might mention, “The player darted between defenders and scored a goal.”

44. Swoop

To move quickly and smoothly in a particular direction or manner.

  • For instance, “The bird swooped down from the sky.”
  • A person might say, “I swooped in and grabbed the last piece of cake.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might mention, “I swooped in and bought that dress before anyone else could.”

45. Barrel

To move or travel at a high speed.

  • For example, “The car barreled down the highway.”
  • A person might say, “I barreled through the finish line and won the race.”
  • In a discussion about a fast train, someone might mention, “That train barrels through the countryside.”

46. Blaze

This term refers to the act of smoking marijuana. It is often used in a casual or informal setting.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s go blaze up after work.”
  • In a conversation about recreational drug use, someone might ask, “Do you blaze?”
  • A person sharing their weekend plans might say, “I’m just going to stay home and blaze.”

47. Charge

This slang term is used to describe the act of injecting illegal drugs, particularly substances like heroin or methamphetamine.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was caught with drugs and charged with possession and intent to charge.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, a person might mention, “He’s been clean for two years, but he still struggles with the desire to charge.”
  • A person sharing their past experiences might say, “I used to charge, but I’ve been in recovery for five years now.”