Top 64 Slang For Crack Cocaine – Meaning & Usage

Crack cocaine, a highly addictive and dangerous drug, has unfortunately become a prevalent issue in many communities. But what about the slang terms used to refer to this illicit substance? In this eye-opening listicle, we’ve compiled some of the most common and intriguing slang for crack cocaine. Whether you’re looking to expand your knowledge or simply curious about the hidden language surrounding this topic, we’ve got you covered.

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1. Rock

This term refers to the solid form of cocaine that is typically smoked. It is called a “rock” because it resembles a small stone or pebble.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to rock and can’t stop smoking it.”
  • In a discussion about illicit drugs, a user might ask, “What are the dangers of using rock?”
  • A person talking about crack addiction might say, “She hit rock bottom when she lost everything due to her addiction.”

2. Coke

Although “coke” can refer to powdered cocaine, it is also commonly used as a slang term for crack cocaine. The term is derived from the word “cocaine.”

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s hooked on coke and can’t quit.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, a user might ask, “What’s the difference between coke and crack?”
  • A person discussing the dangers of cocaine addiction might say, “Using coke can have severe health consequences.”

3. Base

This term is another slang word for crack cocaine. It is derived from the fact that crack cocaine is made by processing cocaine with baking soda, resulting in a solid “base” form.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been using base for years and can’t kick the habit.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, a user might ask, “What are the signs of someone using base?”
  • A person talking about the impact of crack cocaine might say, “Base can devastate communities and ruin lives.”

4. Blow

While “blow” can refer to powdered cocaine, it is also used as a slang term for crack cocaine. The term “blow” is thought to originate from the act of inhaling the drug through the nose.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been blowing for years and it’s taken a toll on his health.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, a user might ask, “What are the effects of using blow?”
  • A person discussing the dangers of cocaine addiction might say, “Blow can lead to serious respiratory problems and addiction.”

5. White

This term refers to crack cocaine due to its white, crystalline appearance. It is called “white” to distinguish it from other forms of cocaine, such as powdered cocaine or freebase cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been using white for a long time and it’s ruining his life.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, a user might ask, “What are the withdrawal symptoms of white?”
  • A person talking about the illegal drug trade might say, “White is a highly addictive and dangerous substance.”

6. Rocks

This term refers to crack cocaine that has been processed into solid chunks or rocks, typically for smoking. It is a common street term for crack cocaine.

  • For example, “He was caught with a bag of rocks in his pocket.”
  • A person discussing drug addiction might say, “Crack cocaine users often refer to their drug as rocks.”
  • In a conversation about illegal substances, someone might mention, “Rocks are a highly addictive and dangerous form of cocaine.”

7. Candy

This term is a slang for crack cocaine, often used to refer to the drug in a less stigmatizing or alarming way. It may allude to the enticing and addictive nature of the substance.

  • For instance, “He was addicted to candy for years before seeking help.”
  • In a discussion about substance abuse, someone might say, “Candy is a highly addictive and destructive drug.”
  • A person warning others about the dangers of crack cocaine might say, “Don’t be fooled by the innocent-sounding name, candy can ruin lives.”

8. Hard

This term is a common slang for crack cocaine, derived from the solid and crystalline form of the drug. It is often used to differentiate crack cocaine from powdered cocaine.

  • For example, “He was arrested for possession of hard.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might say, “Hard is a highly addictive and dangerous substance.”
  • A person discussing the effects of crack cocaine might mention, “Smoking hard can lead to immediate and intense euphoria.”

9. Tornado

This term is a slang for crack cocaine, alluding to the intense and chaotic effects of the drug on the user’s mind and body. It may also refer to the rapid and destructive nature of crack addiction.

  • For instance, “He was spiraling down into the tornado of addiction.”
  • In a discussion about the consequences of drug abuse, someone might say, “The tornado of crack cocaine can tear lives apart.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I got caught in the tornado of crack addiction and lost everything.”

10. Gravel

This term is a slang for crack cocaine, comparing the appearance of the drug to small pieces of gravel or rocks. It may also allude to the gritty and rough nature of the drug and its effects.

  • For example, “He was found with a bag of gravel in his possession.”
  • In a conversation about substance abuse, someone might say, “Gravel is a highly addictive and destructive substance.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of crack cocaine might mention, “The high from smoking gravel can be intense and short-lived.”

11. Freebase

Freebase is a term used to describe crack cocaine that has been purified to its base form, making it more potent and addictive. It is typically smoked or vaporized for a quick and intense high.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to freebase and can’t seem to quit.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might mention, “Freebase is one of the most dangerous and addictive forms of cocaine.”
  • A news article might report, “The police seized a large quantity of freebase during the drug bust.”

12. White lady

White lady is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. The term is believed to originate from the color of the drug, which is typically white or off-white in appearance.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been using white lady for years and it’s taken a toll on his health.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, a person might mention, “White lady is highly addictive and can ruin lives.”
  • A news headline might read, “Authorities seize a stash of white lady in major drug bust.”

13. Devil’s dandruff

Devil’s dandruff is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. The term is a play on words, comparing the white, powdery appearance of the drug to dandruff, while also implying its dangerous and addictive nature.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s hooked on devil’s dandruff and it’s destroying his life.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might mention, “Devil’s dandruff is a highly potent and dangerous form of cocaine.”
  • A news report might state, “The police recovered a significant amount of devil’s dandruff during a raid on a drug den.”

14. French fries

French fries is a slang term used as a code word for crack cocaine. The term is used to discreetly refer to the drug in conversations or text messages.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Do you know where I can get some French fries?” to indicate they are looking for crack cocaine.
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, a person might mention, “French fries is just one of the many street names for crack cocaine.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities intercepted a shipment of French fries, which turned out to be a cover for crack cocaine.”

15. Scrabble

Scrabble is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. The term is believed to have originated from the crackling sound that the drug makes when it is heated and smoked.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been playing a dangerous game of Scrabble and it’s ruining his life.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might mention, “Scrabble is a highly addictive and destructive drug.”
  • A news headline might read, “Authorities crack down on Scrabble dealers in major drug bust.”

16. Cookies

Cookies refer to small pieces of crack cocaine. The term is derived from the resemblance of crack cocaine rocks to cookies. It is a common street term used to discreetly discuss crack cocaine.

  • For example, a drug dealer might ask, “You want some cookies?”
  • A person discussing drug addiction might say, “He’s been hooked on cookies for years.”
  • In a conversation about illegal substances, someone might mention, “Cookies are a dangerous and highly addictive drug.”

17. Nuggets

Nuggets is a slang term used to describe small rocks of crack cocaine. The term is derived from the resemblance of crack cocaine rocks to chicken nuggets. It is a discreet way to refer to crack cocaine in conversations.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Where can I find some nuggets?”
  • A person discussing drug abuse might say, “He’s been buying nuggets from that dealer.”
  • In a conversation about illegal substances, someone might warn, “Nuggets are highly addictive and can ruin lives.”

18. Electric kool-aid

Electric kool-aid is a code name used to refer to crack cocaine. The term is derived from the book “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” by Tom Wolfe, which describes the use of psychedelic drugs. It is a less obvious way to discuss crack cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “I heard he’s into electric kool-aid.”
  • A person discussing drug culture might mention, “Electric kool-aid is a dangerous drug with severe consequences.”
  • In a conversation about illegal substances, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried electric kool-aid?”

19. Rock star

Rock star is a term used to describe a person who uses crack cocaine. The term implies that the person is addicted to crack cocaine and exhibits erratic behavior, similar to the stereotype of a rock star. It is a slang term used to identify crack cocaine users.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been living like a rock star since he started using crack.”
  • A person discussing drug addiction might say, “Crack cocaine turns people into rock stars.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Rock stars often suffer from the consequences of crack cocaine addiction.”

20. Jelly beans

Jelly beans is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine rocks. The term is derived from the resemblance of crack cocaine rocks to colorful jelly beans. It is a discreet way to discuss crack cocaine.

  • For example, a drug dealer might ask, “You want some jelly beans?”
  • A person discussing drug abuse might say, “He’s been buying jelly beans from that dealer.”
  • In a conversation about illegal substances, someone might mention, “Jelly beans are a dangerous and highly addictive drug.”

21. Scrabble tiles

This term refers to small pieces of crack cocaine that resemble the tiles used in the game Scrabble. It is often used to refer to a small quantity of crack cocaine.

  • For example, “He had a baggie filled with scrabble tiles.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might say, “People often start with just a few scrabble tiles and end up addicted.”
  • A law enforcement officer might report, “We found several scrabble tiles during the drug bust.”

This term refers to crack cocaine in its solid form, resembling a lump of cookie dough. It is often used to describe the appearance of crack cocaine.

  • For instance, “He bought a chunk of cookie dough from his dealer.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “I prefer cookie dough over powder cocaine.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of crack cocaine might warn, “Cookie dough can be highly addictive and destructive.”

23. Crack rock

This term refers to the solid form of crack cocaine. It is called a “rock” because of its appearance and texture.

  • For example, “He was caught with a bag of crack rocks.”
  • In a discussion about drug rehabilitation, someone might say, “Crack rocks can be the hardest form of cocaine to quit.”
  • A former addict might share their experience, “I hit rock bottom when I was smoking crack rocks.”

24. Electric lady

This term refers to crack cocaine that has been mixed with PCP (phencyclidine), a powerful hallucinogenic drug. The combination of crack cocaine and PCP can produce intense and unpredictable effects.

  • For instance, “He was arrested for possession of electric lady.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might say, “Electric lady is a dangerous and highly addictive substance.”
  • A health professional might discuss the dangers of electric lady, saying, “The use of crack cocaine mixed with PCP can lead to severe physical and mental health problems.”

25. Jelly babies

This term refers to crack cocaine rocks that have been wrapped in candy, resembling the popular British confectionery called Jelly Babies. It is a slang term used to disguise the sale or transport of crack cocaine.

  • For example, “He was caught with a bag of jelly babies, but they were actually crack cocaine.”
  • In a discussion about drug trafficking, someone might say, “Criminals often use creative methods to conceal jelly babies filled with crack cocaine.”
  • A law enforcement officer might report, “We intercepted a shipment of jelly babies containing crack cocaine.”

26. White hurricane

White hurricane refers to crack cocaine that has been adulterated with other substances, such as powdered caffeine or other stimulants. This term is used to describe crack cocaine that has a more intense and potent effect.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I got some white hurricane and it really gave me a strong high.”
  • In a discussion about different forms of crack cocaine, someone might mention, “White hurricane is often cheaper but more dangerous due to the added stimulants.”
  • A person warning about the dangers of crack cocaine might say, “Stay away from white hurricane as it can have unpredictable effects on the body.”

27. Gravel stones

Gravel stones are small rocks or pebbles of crack cocaine. The term is used to describe the physical appearance of crack cocaine, which often resembles small stones or pieces of gravel.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I found some gravel stones on the street and knew they were crack cocaine.”
  • In a conversation about drug paraphernalia, someone might mention, “Crack cocaine is typically smoked using a pipe or by heating up the gravel stones.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of crack cocaine might warn, “Be careful not to mistake gravel stones for regular rocks, as they can have serious consequences.”

28. Hard rock

Hard rock refers to the solid form of crack cocaine. It is called “hard rock” because crack cocaine is typically processed into solid crystals or rocks that can be broken down into smaller pieces for smoking.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I prefer smoking hard rock because it gives me a faster and more intense high.”
  • In a discussion about different forms of crack cocaine, someone might mention, “Hard rock is the most common form of crack cocaine found on the streets.”
  • A person warning about the addictive nature of crack cocaine might say, “Once you start smoking hard rock, it’s hard to stop.”

29. Devil’s powder

Devil’s powder is a street name for crack cocaine. The term is used to describe the highly addictive and destructive nature of crack cocaine, which can have severe effects on a person’s physical and mental health.

  • For instance, a drug user might say, “I’m hooked on devil’s powder and can’t seem to quit.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Devil’s powder is one of the most dangerous drugs on the streets.”
  • A person discussing the impact of crack cocaine on communities might say, “The prevalence of devil’s powder has led to increased crime rates and broken families.”

30. French fries with cheese

French fries with cheese is a code phrase used to refer to crack cocaine. This term is used to disguise conversations about crack cocaine in public or over the phone.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I’m craving some french fries with cheese” to indicate they want crack cocaine.
  • In a conversation about drug slang, someone might mention, “French fries with cheese is a common code phrase used in the drug trade.”
  • A person warning about the dangers of crack cocaine might say, “Be aware of code phrases like french fries with cheese, as they can be used to discuss illegal substances in plain sight.”

31. Scrabble pieces

“Scrabble pieces” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine rocks, which resemble small, irregularly shaped pieces. The term is derived from the resemblance of crack cocaine rocks to the small tiles used in the game of Scrabble.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I need to pick up some Scrabble pieces for tonight.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might mention, “The streets are flooded with Scrabble pieces.”
  • A law enforcement officer might use the term to describe confiscated drugs, saying, “We found a stash of Scrabble pieces during the bust.”

“Cookie monster” is a slang term used to refer to a person who is addicted to crack cocaine. The term is derived from the insatiable and uncontrollable cravings that crack cocaine addicts experience, similar to the way the Cookie Monster from Sesame Street craves cookies.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He used to be a successful lawyer, but now he’s just a cookie monster.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of drug addiction, one might mention, “Crack cocaine turns people into cookie monsters.”
  • A counselor working with drug addicts might say, “Helping cookie monsters recover from their addiction is a challenging but rewarding process.”

33. Crack stones

“Crack stones” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine rocks. The term is derived from the appearance and texture of crack cocaine, which often resembles small stones or pebbles.

  • For example, a drug dealer might say, “I’ve got some high-quality crack stones for sale.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might mention, “Crack stones are highly addictive and dangerous.”
  • A person discussing the impact of drugs on their community might say, “The streets are littered with crack stones.”

34. Electric sheep

“Electric sheep” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. The term is derived from the intense and powerful effects of crack cocaine, which can make users feel wired and hyperactive, similar to the way an electric current can energize and stimulate.

  • For instance, a drug user might say, “I’m looking for some electric sheep to party all night.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, one might mention, “Electric sheep can quickly destroy lives.”
  • A healthcare professional working with drug addicts might use the term to describe the dangers of crack cocaine, saying, “We need to educate people about the risks of electric sheep.”

35. Jelly beans on toast

“Jelly beans on toast” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine rocks. The term is derived from the appearance of crack cocaine rocks, which can resemble small colorful candies, like jelly beans, on a piece of toast.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I need to get my hands on some jelly beans on toast.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Jelly beans on toast are ruining lives.”
  • A law enforcement officer might use the term to describe a recent drug seizure, saying, “We found a stash of jelly beans on toast during the raid.”

36. Whiteout

Whiteout refers to powdered crack cocaine, which is a form of the drug that has been crushed into a fine powder. The term “whiteout” is used to describe the color and texture of the drug.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I prefer whiteout because it’s easier to snort.”
  • In a conversation about different forms of crack cocaine, someone might mention, “Whiteout is often seen as a purer form of the drug.”
  • A person discussing drug addiction might warn, “Whiteout can be highly addictive and dangerous.”

37. Gravel nuggets

Gravel nuggets are small chunks of crack cocaine. The term “gravel” is used to describe the appearance and texture of the drug, which resembles small pieces of gravel or rocks.

  • For instance, a drug dealer might say, “I’ve got some gravel nuggets for sale.”
  • In a discussion about different forms of crack cocaine, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried smoking gravel nuggets?”
  • A person discussing the dangers of drug use might mention, “Gravel nuggets can cause serious health problems and addiction.”

38. Hard candy rocks

Hard candy rocks are solid pieces of crack cocaine. The term “hard candy” is used to describe the appearance and texture of the drug, which resembles small, hard candies or rocks.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I’ve got some hard candy rocks if you’re interested.”
  • In a conversation about different forms of crack cocaine, someone might mention, “Smoking hard candy rocks can provide an intense and immediate high.”
  • A person discussing the impact of drug addiction might note, “Hard candy rocks can lead to severe health issues and dependency.”

39. Devil’s sugar

Devil’s sugar is a slang term for crack cocaine. The term “devil’s sugar” is used to emphasize the addictive and dangerous nature of the drug.

  • For instance, a drug user might say, “I’m addicted to devil’s sugar.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug use, someone might mention, “Devil’s sugar can destroy lives and communities.”
  • A person discussing the need for drug rehabilitation programs might argue, “We need more resources to help individuals overcome their addiction to devil’s sugar.”

40. Crack

Crack is the solid form of cocaine. The term “crack” refers to the cracking sound that occurs when the drug is heated and smoked.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “Do you have any crack?”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried crack?”
  • A person discussing the impact of crack cocaine on communities might note, “Crack has devastated many neighborhoods and led to widespread addiction.”

41. Snow

“Snow” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine, a highly addictive stimulant drug made from powdered cocaine. The term “snow” is often used to describe the white, powdery appearance of crack cocaine.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s addicted to snow,” meaning that the individual is addicted to crack cocaine.
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Snow is a dangerous and illegal substance.”
  • Law enforcement might use the term “snow” when referring to crack cocaine during an investigation.
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42. Ready rock

“Ready rock” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. It is called “ready rock” because crack cocaine is typically sold in solid, rock-like form and is ready to be smoked.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s always looking for ready rock,” indicating that the individual is searching for crack cocaine.
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might warn, “Avoid ready rock at all costs. It can ruin your life.”
  • Law enforcement might use the term “ready rock” when discussing crack cocaine during a drug bust.

43. Apple jacks

The term “apple jacks” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. It is unclear how this term came about, but it is likely due to the association of crack cocaine with the apple-shaped appearance of the drug.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s addicted to apple jacks,” meaning that the individual is addicted to crack cocaine.
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Apple jacks is a dangerous and highly addictive substance.”
  • Law enforcement might use the term “apple jacks” when referring to crack cocaine during an investigation.

44. Dice

The term “dice” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. It is unclear how this term originated, but it may be related to the process of breaking up or cutting crack cocaine into small pieces before smoking it.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s always looking for dice,” indicating that the individual is searching for crack cocaine.
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might warn, “Stay away from dice. It can destroy your life.”
  • Law enforcement might use the term “dice” when discussing crack cocaine during a drug bust.
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45. Hardball

The term “hardball” is a slang term used to refer to crack cocaine. It is called “hardball” because crack cocaine is typically sold in solid, rock-like form, resembling a hard ball.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s addicted to hardball,” meaning that the individual is addicted to crack cocaine.
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Hardball is an extremely dangerous and addictive substance.”
  • Law enforcement might use the term “hardball” when referring to crack cocaine during an investigation.

46. Sleet

Sleet is a slang term for crack cocaine, which is a form of freebase cocaine. It refers to the crystalline rocks or “stones” of crack cocaine that resemble small pieces of sleet or ice.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to sleet and can’t stop using.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried sleet?”
  • A news report might mention, “The police seized a large amount of sleet in a drug bust.”

47. Yola

Yola is a slang term for crack cocaine. It is derived from the word “cocaina,” which is Spanish for cocaine. Yola is used to refer specifically to crack cocaine, which is a freebase form of the drug.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s been selling yola on the streets.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried yola?”
  • A news article might report, “The police arrested a suspect with a large quantity of yola.”

48. Zips

Zips is a slang term for small bags or packages of crack cocaine. The term is derived from the small ziplock bags or zippered pouches in which crack cocaine is often packaged for sale.

  • For example, a person might say, “He was caught with a bunch of zips in his pocket.”
  • In a discussion about drug trafficking, someone might mention, “The dealers were selling zips on the street.”
  • A news report might state, “The police confiscated several zips of crack cocaine during a raid.”

49. Hubba

Hubba is a slang term for crack cocaine. It is derived from the phrase “hubba hubba,” which is an expression of excitement or admiration. Hubba is used to refer specifically to crack cocaine, which is a freebase form of the drug.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s addicted to hubba and can’t quit.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried hubba?”
  • A news article might report, “The police arrested a suspect with a stash of hubba.”

50. Ice

Ice is a slang term for crack cocaine. It is derived from the crystalline appearance of crack cocaine, which resembles ice. Ice is used to refer specifically to crack cocaine, which is a freebase form of the drug.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s been smoking ice for years.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried ice?”
  • A news article might report, “The police seized a significant amount of ice during a drug raid.”

51. Paste

Paste is a slang term for crack cocaine, which is a highly addictive stimulant drug. It is derived from the way crack cocaine is prepared, where cocaine powder is mixed with baking soda or ammonia and water to form a paste-like substance. The paste is then dried and broken into small rocks, which are smoked for their intense and immediate effects.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to paste and has been struggling with it for years.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might mention, “Paste is a dangerous and illegal substance with severe health consequences.”
  • A law enforcement officer might use the term in a report, stating, “The suspect was found in possession of crack cocaine, also known as paste.”

52. Moon rock

Moon rock is a slang term for crack cocaine, which refers to the appearance of the drug. Crack cocaine rocks are often white or off-white in color, resembling small rocks or pebbles. The term “moon rock” is used to describe the crack cocaine’s resemblance to rocks found on the moon’s surface.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been selling moon rocks on the streets.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, one might comment, “Moon rock is a highly potent form of crack cocaine.”
  • A news article might mention, “Police seized a large quantity of moon rock during a drug bust in the city.”

53. Pebbles

Pebbles is a slang term for crack cocaine, describing the small and irregularly-shaped rocks that the drug is typically sold in. Crack cocaine is often broken into small pieces resembling pebbles before being sold and smoked. The term “pebbles” is used to refer to these rock-like formations of crack cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to pebbles and is in need of help.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, one might mention, “Pebbles are a dangerous and highly addictive form of crack cocaine.”
  • A rehab counselor might use the term in a session, stating, “Many individuals struggle with the addiction to pebbles and require professional treatment.”

54. Tootsie roll

Tootsie roll is a slang term for crack cocaine, referring to the appearance and texture of the drug. Crack cocaine rocks are often dark brown or black in color and have a sticky consistency, similar to Tootsie Rolls, a popular chocolate candy. The term “Tootsie roll” is used to describe the resemblance between the drug and the candy.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She’s been using Tootsie rolls for years and it’s taken a toll on her health.”
  • In a conversation about illicit substances, one might comment, “Tootsie rolls are a dangerous and highly addictive form of crack cocaine.”
  • A health professional might use the term in a presentation, stating, “The street name for crack cocaine, Tootsie rolls, is derived from its appearance and texture.”

55. Waffle

Waffle is a slang term for crack cocaine, referring to the pattern that forms on the surface of the drug when it is heated and smoked. The term “waffle” is used to describe the crack cocaine’s resemblance to the pattern on a waffle.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been hooked on waffle for years and it’s ruining his life.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might mention, “Waffle is a dangerous and highly addictive form of crack cocaine.”
  • A law enforcement officer might use the term in a report, stating, “The suspect was found in possession of waffle, a street name for crack cocaine.”

56. Yellow jackets

Yellow jackets refer to amphetamines, which are stimulant drugs that increase energy and alertness. The term “yellow jackets” may specifically refer to a type of amphetamine pill that is yellow in color.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I took some yellow jackets to help me stay awake during my night shift.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, a person might mention, “Yellow jackets are often used recreationally for their stimulating effects.”
  • A user might post on a drug forum, “Has anyone tried those yellow jackets? What are the effects like?”

57. Twinkie

In the context of crack cocaine, “twinkie” refers to a substance that looks like crack cocaine but does not contain any cocaine. It is a counterfeit or fake version of the drug.

  • For example, a person might say, “I bought what I thought was crack, but it turned out to be a twinkie.”
  • In a discussion about drug markets, someone might warn, “Be careful when buying crack on the streets, there’s a lot of twinkie going around.”
  • A recovering addict might share their experience, “I used to smoke twinkie thinking it was crack, but it never gave me the same high.”

58. Woolies

Woolies refers to a combination of crack cocaine and marijuana, typically smoked together. The term may also be used to describe a cigarette or joint laced with crack cocaine.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s roll a woolie and get high.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “I tried smoking a woolie once, but it was too intense for me.”
  • A user might post on a drug forum, “Any tips for smoking woolies? I’m curious about the effects.”

59. 24/7

In the context of crack cocaine, “24/7” refers to the act of using crack cocaine continuously or without interruption. It implies a state of constant drug use.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been on a 24/7 binge for the past week.”
  • In a conversation about addiction, a person might mention, “Crack cocaine can lead to 24/7 drug use and severe dependence.”
  • A recovering addict might share their experience, “I used to be on crack 24/7, but now I’m working towards recovery.”

60. 8-ball

In the context of crack cocaine, “8-ball” refers to an eighth of an ounce of the drug. This term is commonly used in the drug trade to refer to a specific quantity of crack cocaine.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I bought an 8-ball of crack for the weekend.”
  • In a conversation about drug prices, a person might mention, “An 8-ball of crack can cost around $200.”
  • A user might post on a drug forum, “What’s the going rate for an 8-ball of crack in your area?”

61. Biscuits

This term refers to crack cocaine that has been broken down into small rocks or pebbles, resembling biscuits. It is a common slang term used to discreetly refer to the drug.

  • For example, “He was caught with a bag of biscuits in his pocket.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “I heard he’s been smoking biscuits.”
  • A news report might mention, “Police seized a significant amount of biscuits during a drug bust.”

62. Gold dust

This term is used to describe high-quality crack cocaine that is considered to be pure and potent. It is often referred to as “gold dust” due to its value and desirability.

  • For instance, “He only smokes gold dust because he wants the best.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might say, “Gold dust is highly addictive and dangerous.”
  • A user might share their experience, “I had my first taste of gold dust last night, and it was intense.”

63. Rock candy

This slang term refers to crack cocaine that has been processed into crystallized rocks, resembling rock candy. It is a common term used to describe the appearance of the drug.

  • For example, “He was found with a bag of rock candy in his car.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “I’ve tried smoking rock candy before.”
  • A documentary about addiction might mention, “Rock candy is a dangerous and highly addictive substance.”

64. Devil’s candy

This term is used to refer to crack cocaine, emphasizing its highly addictive and destructive nature. It is a metaphorical term that portrays the drug as a temptation or evil substance.

  • For instance, “He was hooked on the devil’s candy for years.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might say, “Crack cocaine is often referred to as the devil’s candy.”
  • A rehab counselor might warn, “Stay away from the devil’s candy if you want to turn your life around.”