Top 20 Slang For Going Golfing – Meaning & Usage

Golfing, a sport known for its precision and elegance, has its own set of slang and terminology that adds a touch of camaraderie and excitement to the game. Whether you’re a seasoned golfer or just starting out, this listicle is here to guide you through the top slang terms for going golfing. From “teeing it up” to “making birdies,” we’ve got you covered with all the lingo you need to sound like a pro on the green. So grab your clubs and get ready to dive into this fun and informative article!

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1. All Square

When two players or teams have the same score in a match or hole, they are “all square”. It means they are tied and neither is winning.

  • For example, in a match play format, a player might say, “After 9 holes, we’re all square.”
  • In a friendly competition, someone might comment, “We were all square until the last hole.”
  • A golfer might mention, “I had a chance to win, but we ended up all square in the end.”

2. Back-Door Putt

When a golfer makes a putt that goes in the hole from behind the cup, it is called a “back-door putt”. It is a term used to describe a lucky or unexpected putt.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I thought I missed it, but it went in as a back-door putt.”
  • Another golfer might comment, “I got lucky with a back-door putt on that hole.”
  • During a round, someone might exclaim, “I can’t believe I made a back-door putt!”

3. Banana Ball

A “banana ball” refers to a golf shot that curves dramatically in one direction, resembling the shape of a banana. It is often used to describe a shot that veers off course and doesn’t go straight.

  • For example, a golfer might say, “I hit a banana ball off the tee and ended up in the rough.”
  • Another player might comment, “I always struggle with a banana ball when I try to fade the ball.”
  • During a friendly game, someone might joke, “Watch out for my banana ball, it might hit you!”

4. Barkies

A “barkie” is a term used to describe scoring one over par on a hole. It is a slang term often used in casual or recreational golf.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I had a few barkies during my round yesterday.”
  • Another golfer might comment, “I hate getting a barkie, it feels like a missed opportunity.”
  • During a friendly competition, someone might ask, “How many barkies did you have today?”

5. Birdie

A “birdie” is a term used to describe scoring one under par on a hole. It is a common term in golf and signifies a good score.

  • For example, a player might say, “I made a birdie on the 7th hole.”
  • Another golfer might comment, “Getting a birdie feels great, it’s like a mini victory.”
  • During a tournament, someone might announce, “He just made a birdie and moved up the leaderboard!”

6. Putting around

This phrase is used to describe playing golf in a relaxed and leisurely manner, without any serious competition or pressure. It implies taking it easy and enjoying the game.

  • For example, “I don’t feel like playing a full round today, let’s just go putting around.”
  • A golfer might say, “I’m not in the mood for a competitive game, just putting around sounds perfect.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you want to join us for a round of golf, or are you just putting around?”

7. Smacking the dimples

This slang phrase refers to the action of hitting the golf ball. “Smacking the dimples” emphasizes the act of making contact with the ball, with a playful tone.

  • For instance, a golfer might say, “I’m heading to the driving range to smack the dimples.”
  • During a golf lesson, an instructor might instruct the student, “Focus on your swing and make sure you’re smacking the dimples consistently.”
  • A golfer might brag, “I’ve been practicing my swing, and now I can really smack the dimples!”

8. Knocking it around

This slang phrase is used to describe playing golf in a casual and relaxed manner. It suggests a lack of seriousness or competition and implies just having fun on the course.

  • For example, “Let’s just go out and knock it around, no need to keep score.”
  • A golfer might say, “I’m not in the mood for a competitive game, let’s just go knocking it around.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you playing a proper round of golf, or just knocking it around today?”

9. Taking a mulligan

In golf, a mulligan refers to the act of retaking a shot without counting the first one. It is usually allowed as a friendly gesture or for practice purposes. “Taking a mulligan” means giving yourself a second chance to make a better shot.

  • For instance, a golfer might say, “That shot was terrible, I’m taking a mulligan.”
  • During a friendly game, a player might offer, “You can take a mulligan if you’re not happy with your shot.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can I take a mulligan on that last shot? I completely missed the ball.”

10. Going for a birdie

In golf, a birdie refers to achieving a score of one stroke under par on a hole. “Going for a birdie” means aiming to achieve this score on a specific hole.

  • For example, a golfer might say, “I’m feeling confident, I’m going for a birdie on this hole.”
  • During a tournament, a commentator might say, “He’s in a great position to go for a birdie and gain an advantage.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you going for a birdie on every hole, or just on the par 5s?”

11. Playing a skins game

A skins game is a type of golf competition where each hole has a monetary value. The player who wins the hole outright (with the lowest score) wins the money for that hole. If no one wins the hole outright, the money carries over to the next hole.

  • For example, “We’re playing a skins game today, so make sure you bring some cash.”
  • In a skins game, a player might say, “I just won a skin on that last hole!”
  • Another player might ask, “How many skins are we playing for on this hole?”

12. Playing a scramble

A scramble is a golf format where each player in a team hits their own shot, and the team selects the best shot to play from. All players then hit their next shot from that spot, and the process continues until the ball is holed.

  • For instance, “We’re playing a scramble today, so we can all contribute to each shot.”
  • In a scramble, a player might say, “That was a great shot, let’s use it as our team shot.”
  • Another player might ask, “Who’s hitting first for our scramble team?”

13. Going for a green jacket

Going for a green jacket refers to participating in the Masters Tournament, one of the four major championships in professional golf. The winner of the Masters is awarded a green jacket, which has become a symbol of excellence in the sport.

  • For example, “He’s been practicing hard to have a chance at going for a green jacket.”
  • In a discussion about golf tournaments, someone might say, “The Masters is the most prestigious event for golfers going for a green jacket.”
  • A golf fan might ask, “Who do you think has the best chance of going for a green jacket this year?”

14. Going for a hole-in-one challenge

Going for a hole-in-one challenge means trying to hit the ball into the hole with a single stroke. It is considered a rare and impressive feat in golf, and many golfers strive to achieve a hole-in-one during their golfing career.

  • For instance, “I’ve been practicing my swing for months, hoping to accomplish the hole-in-one challenge.”
  • In a discussion about golf achievements, someone might say, “Getting a hole-in-one is the ultimate goal for golfers going for a hole-in-one challenge.”
  • A golfer might exclaim, “I can’t believe I just aced that hole! It’s a dream come true for the hole-in-one challenge.”

15. Going for a round of 18

Going for a round of 18 means playing a complete game of golf, which consists of 18 holes. It is the standard number of holes in a round of golf, and golfers often use this term to indicate that they are playing a full game.

  • For example, “I’m going for a round of 18 this afternoon. Do you want to join?”
  • In a conversation about golf plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet at the course tomorrow morning and go for a round of 18.”
  • A golfer might ask, “What’s your favorite course for going for a round of 18?”

16. Teeing it up

This phrase is used to describe the act of getting ready to take a shot from the designated tee box at the start of each hole.

  • For example, a golfer might say, “I’m teeing it up on the first hole.”
  • Another golfer might ask, “Are you ready to tee it up?”
  • A golf instructor might advise, “Make sure you have a good setup when teeing it up.”

17. Sinking a hole-in-one

This phrase is used when a golfer successfully hits the ball directly into the hole from the tee box, completing the entire hole with a single stroke.

  • For instance, a golfer might exclaim, “I can’t believe I just sank a hole-in-one!”
  • Another golfer might congratulate their friend, saying, “You’re so lucky to have scored a hole-in-one.”
  • A golf commentator might announce, “And he does it! Sinking a hole-in-one on the final hole.”

18. Playing a match play

In match play, golfers compete against each other on a hole-by-hole basis, with the goal of winning the most holes rather than achieving the lowest overall score.

  • For example, a golfer might say, “I’m playing a match play against my friend this weekend.”
  • Another golfer might strategize, saying, “In match play, it’s important to focus on winning each hole rather than worrying about your overall score.”
  • A golf coach might explain, “Match play can be a more intense and strategic format compared to stroke play.”

19. Going for a bogey

This phrase is used when a golfer is aiming to finish a hole with a score of one over par. A bogey is a common term in golf that refers to a score that is one stroke over the par for the hole.

  • For instance, a golfer might say, “I’m going for a bogey on this hole.”
  • Another golfer might analyze their game, saying, “I’ve been consistently going for bogeys on most holes.”
  • A golf instructor might advise, “If you’re struggling to make par, focus on going for a bogey instead.”

20. Playing a best ball

In a best ball format, each player in a team plays their own ball throughout the round, and the team’s score for each hole is determined by the lowest score among the team members.

  • For example, a golfer might say, “We’re playing a best ball tournament next week.”
  • Another golfer might strategize, saying, “In best ball, it’s important to have at least one player consistently scoring well.”
  • A golf coach might explain, “Best ball can be a fun and competitive format for team play.”
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