Top 72 Slang For Suspicious – Meaning & Usage

In a world full of suspense and mystery, it’s important to stay in the know when it comes to the latest slang for “suspicious.” Whether you’re trying to decipher your friend’s cryptic texts or simply want to sound like a detective in everyday conversations, we’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a list of the most buzzworthy slang for suspicious. Get ready to add some intrigue to your vocabulary and become the ultimate sleuth!

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1. Sketchy

This term is used to describe something that seems suspicious or questionable in nature.

  • For example, “That guy hanging around the alley looks sketchy.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust that website, it seems sketchy.”
  • In a conversation about a business deal, someone might comment, “The terms of that agreement sound a bit sketchy to me.”

2. Shady

This word is used to describe something or someone that is untrustworthy or dubious.

  • For instance, “I don’t want to go into that bar, it looks shady.”
  • A person might say, “He gave me a shady answer when I asked him about his whereabouts.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious character, someone might comment, “I’ve heard he’s involved in some shady business deals.”

3. Fishy

This term is used to describe something that seems dishonest or suspicious.

  • For example, “The way he was acting was really fishy, I think he’s hiding something.”
  • A person might say, “The sudden change in their behavior is fishy, I wonder what’s going on.”
  • In a conversation about a questionable situation, someone might comment, “Something about that whole story seems fishy to me.”

4. Dodgy

This word is used to describe something or someone that is questionable or unreliable.

  • For instance, “I wouldn’t trust that dodgy-looking website with my credit card information.”
  • A person might say, “His explanations for his actions are always dodgy, I never know if he’s telling the truth.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious product, someone might comment, “The ingredients list on that supplement seems a bit dodgy to me.”

5. Hinky

This term is used to describe something that seems suspicious or not quite right.

  • For example, “I have a hinky feeling about that new neighbor, something doesn’t seem right.”
  • A person might say, “The way she avoided my question was hinky, I think she’s hiding something.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious activity, someone might comment, “There’s something hinky about those financial transactions, we should investigate further.”

6. Sus

Short for “suspicious,” this term is used to describe something or someone that seems questionable or untrustworthy.

  • For example, “That guy’s behavior is really sus. I don’t think we can trust him.”
  • A person might say, “I saw something sus going on in that alley.”
  • In online gaming, a player might accuse another of cheating by saying, “Their gameplay is so sus, they must be using hacks.”

7. Janky

This slang term is used to describe something that is poorly made, in bad condition, or not functioning properly. It can also refer to something that seems suspicious or sketchy.

  • For instance, “This phone is so janky, it keeps freezing and crashing.”
  • A person might say, “I wouldn’t trust that janky website with my personal information.”
  • In reference to a suspicious deal, someone might say, “That seems janky, I wouldn’t get involved.”

8. Shifty

Describing someone or something as “shifty” suggests that they are behaving in a suspicious or untrustworthy manner.

  • For example, “I don’t like the look of that shifty character hanging around.”
  • A person might say, “His shifty eyes make me think he’s up to something.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious business, someone might say, “Their shifty practices are definitely cause for concern.”

9. Questionable

This term is used to express doubt or uncertainty about something. It can also be used to describe something that seems suspicious or unreliable.

  • For instance, “The evidence is questionable, we can’t be sure of the truth.”
  • A person might say, “I find their motives to be highly questionable.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious purchase, someone might say, “The seller’s reputation is questionable, I wouldn’t trust them.”

10. Dubious

Similar to “questionable,” this term is used to express doubt or uncertainty. It can also describe something that seems suspicious or unreliable.

  • For example, “I have dubious feelings about that investment opportunity.”
  • A person might say, “The source of that information seems dubious, I would take it with a grain of salt.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious claim, someone might say, “The evidence provided is dubious at best.”

11. Cautious

Being cautious means being careful and vigilant, especially in situations that may be risky or potentially harmful. It implies a sense of wariness and the need to exercise caution.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m feeling cautious about accepting this job offer without knowing all the details.”
  • In a discussion about safety, someone might advise, “Always be cautious when walking alone at night.”
  • Another might warn, “If something seems too good to be true, be cautious and do your research before committing.”

12. Paranoid

Being paranoid means having an excessive and irrational suspicion or distrust of others. It implies a constant state of unease and the belief that others are out to harm or deceive.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Don’t be paranoid, not everyone is out to get you.”
  • In a conversation about privacy, a person might express, “I try not to be paranoid, but I’m cautious about sharing personal information online.”
  • Another might admit, “I know it’s irrational, but sometimes I can’t help feeling paranoid that someone is watching me.”

13. Side-eye

Giving someone the side-eye means looking at them with suspicion or doubt. It’s a non-verbal expression of disbelief or mistrust.

  • For example, if someone makes a questionable claim, another person might give them the side-eye.
  • In a discussion about someone’s behavior, a person might say, “I couldn’t help but give them the side-eye when they started acting suspicious.”
  • Another might comment, “I got the side-eye from my friends when I told them about my new business venture.”

14. Red flag

A red flag is a metaphorical warning sign that indicates something suspicious or potentially problematic. It’s a signal to be cautious or skeptical about a person, situation, or action.

  • For instance, if someone consistently avoids answering direct questions, it can be seen as a red flag.
  • In a conversation about relationships, a person might say, “When someone shows signs of controlling behavior, it’s a major red flag.”
  • Another might warn, “If a company asks for payment upfront before providing any services, that’s a definite red flag.”

15. Off

When something feels “off,” it means it seems suspicious, strange, or not quite right. It implies a sense of unease or discomfort about a situation or person.

  • For example, if someone’s behavior suddenly changes, a person might say, “Something seems off about them.”
  • In a discussion about a strange occurrence, someone might comment, “There was an off feeling in the air, like something bad was about to happen.”
  • Another might express, “I can’t put my finger on it, but there’s just something off about that place.”

16. Sneaky

This term is used to describe someone or something that is acting in a secretive or underhanded manner.

  • For example, “She gave me a sneaky smile before stealing my cookie.”
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, a player might say, “I’ll find a sneaky hiding spot so no one can find me.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Watch out for that guy, he’s sneaky and can’t be trusted.”

17. Nervous

When someone is feeling nervous, they are experiencing a state of unease or worry. It can also be used to describe a situation that is causing anxiety.

  • For instance, “He seemed nervous during his job interview.”
  • A person might say, “I always get nervous before giving a presentation.”
  • If someone is acting suspiciously, a friend might ask, “Why are you so nervous? What are you hiding?”

18. Wary

Being wary means to be cautious or suspicious of something or someone. It implies a sense of wariness or hesitation.

  • For example, “She was wary of strangers and never let anyone into her house.”
  • If someone offers a deal that seems too good to be true, a person might say, “I’m wary of their intentions.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Be wary of strangers and always stay alert.”

19. Doubtful

When something is doubtful, it means there is uncertainty or skepticism surrounding it. It can also be used to describe a person who is hesitant or unsure.

  • For instance, “I’m doubtful that he will keep his promise.”
  • If someone tells a far-fetched story, a listener might say, “I find that doubtful.”
  • A person might express their doubt by saying, “I’m doubtful of his true intentions.”

20. Untrustworthy

This term is used to describe someone or something that cannot be trusted or relied upon. It implies a lack of trustworthiness or reliability.

  • For example, “He is known for being untrustworthy and always breaking his promises.”
  • If someone has a history of lying, a person might say, “I find him untrustworthy.”
  • A friend might warn another friend, “Be careful, she’s untrustworthy and might betray you.”

21. Deceptive

Deceptive refers to something or someone that is intentionally misleading or dishonest. It implies a hidden agenda or trickery.

  • For example, a person might say, “That salesman was so deceptive, he made promises he couldn’t keep.”
  • In a discussion about magic tricks, someone might say, “The magician’s deceptive techniques left the audience in awe.”
  • A detective investigating a crime might describe a suspect as “deceptive” if they consistently provide false information.
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22. Guilty-looking

Guilty-looking describes someone who appears or behaves in a way that suggests they are guilty of something, even if it’s not clear what that something is.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He had a guilty-looking expression on his face when I asked him about the missing money.”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might point out a defendant’s guilty-looking behavior as evidence of their involvement in the crime.
  • A friend might say, “You seem guilty-looking. Is there something you’re not telling me?”

23. Clandestine

Clandestine refers to something that is done secretly or in a concealed manner, often implying illicit or unauthorized activity.

  • For example, a spy might engage in clandestine operations to gather classified information.
  • In a discussion about covert activities, someone might mention, “Clandestine meetings are crucial to maintain secrecy.”
  • A journalist investigating a scandal might describe the hidden dealings as “clandestine” to emphasize their secretive nature.

24. Inconspicuous

Inconspicuous describes something or someone that does not attract attention or is not easily noticeable. It implies blending in with the surroundings or not standing out in any way.

  • For instance, a spy might dress in inconspicuous clothing to avoid drawing attention.
  • In a conversation about surveillance, someone might say, “The camera was placed in an inconspicuous location to capture discreet footage.”
  • A friend might comment, “You’re so inconspicuous, I almost didn’t see you there!”

25. Underhanded

Underhanded refers to actions or behavior that is deceitful, dishonest, or unethical. It implies a lack of fairness or playing dirty.

  • For example, a person might say, “He used underhanded tactics to win the game.”
  • In a discussion about business practices, someone might mention, “The company’s underhanded dealings eventually led to its downfall.”
  • A colleague might warn, “Watch out for her, she’s known for her underhanded tricks.”

26. Unscrupulous

This term refers to someone or something that lacks moral principles and is willing to engage in unethical or dishonest behavior. It is often used to describe individuals or actions that are suspicious or shady.

  • For example, “He is known for his unscrupulous business practices.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The politician’s unscrupulous behavior raises concerns about their integrity.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Don’t trust that company, they have a reputation for being unscrupulous.”

27. Slimy

This slang term is used to describe someone or something that is suspicious or untrustworthy. It implies a sense of sliminess or slipperiness, as if the person or thing cannot be grasped or trusted.

  • For instance, “I don’t trust him, he gives off a slimy vibe.”
  • In a conversation about a questionable business deal, someone might say, “The whole situation feels slimy.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Be careful around him, he’s known for his slimy behavior.”

28. Snakey

This slang term is used to describe someone who is suspicious or deceitful. It implies that the person acts like a snake, being sneaky and untrustworthy.

  • For example, “Watch out for him, he’s snakey and can’t be trusted.”
  • In a discussion about a manipulative person, someone might say, “She has a snakey personality.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Don’t get involved with that group, they’re known for their snakey tactics.”

29. Creepy

This term is used to describe something or someone that causes a feeling of unease or discomfort. It is often used to describe suspicious or eerie behavior.

  • For instance, “That guy gives me a creepy vibe.”
  • In a conversation about a strange encounter, someone might say, “I had a creepy experience last night.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Stay away from that house, it has a creepy atmosphere.”

30. Spooky

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is unsettling or gives a sense of unease. It is often used to describe suspicious or paranormal occurrences.

  • For example, “The abandoned house has a spooky aura.”
  • In a discussion about a strange phenomenon, someone might say, “There’s something spooky going on.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Be careful in that area, it’s known for its spooky happenings.”

31. Uncanny

This word is used to describe something that is strange or unusual in a way that makes you feel uneasy or suspicious.

  • For example, “That painting has an uncanny resemblance to my deceased grandmother.”
  • A person might say, “There’s something uncanny about how he always knows what I’m thinking.”
  • In a thriller movie, a character might mention, “The uncanny behavior of the suspect made me suspect something was off.”

32. Queer

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is strange, suspicious, or out of the ordinary.

  • For instance, “There’s something queer about the new neighbor.”
  • A person might say, “I had a queer feeling that something bad was going to happen.”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “The queer behavior of the suspect raised my suspicions.”

33. Peculiar

This word is used to describe something that is strange, odd, or out of the ordinary, often in a way that raises suspicion.

  • For example, “There’s something peculiar about the way he always avoids eye contact.”
  • A person might say, “I found it peculiar that she arrived late to every meeting.”
  • In a crime investigation, a detective might note, “The peculiar pattern of the crimes led us to suspect a serial offender.”

34. Unsettling

This term is used to describe something that makes you feel uneasy, disturbed, or suspicious.

  • For instance, “The unsettling noise coming from the basement made me fear for my safety.”
  • A person might say, “His unsettling stare gave me the creeps.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might mention, “The unsettling atmosphere of the haunted house made everyone on edge.”

35. Skeptical

This word is used to describe someone who is doubtful or suspicious of something.

  • For example, “I’m skeptical about his claims of being a millionaire.”
  • A person might say, “I’m skeptical of the new diet fad.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might note, “Many people are skeptical of politicians’ promises.”

36. Cattywampus

This term is used to describe something that is not straight or aligned properly. It can also be used figuratively to describe something that is suspicious or questionable.

  • For example, “The picture frame on the wall is cattywampus.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust that guy, something about him seems cattywampus.”
  • In a conversation about a strange occurrence, someone might comment, “That situation was totally cattywampus.”

37. Nefarious

This word is used to describe something that is extremely wicked or evil. It implies that the person or action is morally wrong and suspicious.

  • For instance, “The nefarious plot to overthrow the government was uncovered.”
  • A person might say, “I heard he’s involved in some nefarious activities.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might comment, “The nefarious gang was finally brought to justice.”

38. Skeevy

This term is used to describe someone or something that is disreputable, shady, or creepy. It suggests that the person or thing is suspicious and should be avoided.

  • For example, “That guy gives me a skeevy vibe.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust that website, it looks really skeevy.”
  • In a conversation about a questionable business, someone might comment, “Their practices seem really skeevy.”

39. Dicey

This word is used to describe a situation that is risky, uncertain, or potentially dangerous. It suggests that the situation is suspicious and caution should be exercised.

  • For instance, “The weather conditions are dicey, so be careful on the roads.”
  • A person might say, “I wouldn’t get involved in that deal, it seems too dicey.”
  • In a discussion about a potentially dangerous activity, someone might comment, “That’s a dicey proposition, I wouldn’t take the risk.”

40. Suss

This term is used to describe the act of investigating or figuring something out, especially when it comes to suspicious or questionable matters.

  • For example, “I need to suss out what’s really going on.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll suss out the truth and get to the bottom of it.”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious situation, someone might comment, “We need to suss out who’s behind all of this.”

41. Snaky

This term is used to describe someone or something that is sneaky, dishonest, or untrustworthy.

  • For example, “I don’t trust him, he seems snaky.”
  • A person might say, “That salesperson gave me a snaky smile, I think they’re trying to scam me.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s behavior, one might comment, “She’s always acting snaky, I never know what she’s up to.”

42. Snake oil

This term originated from the 19th-century American practice of selling fraudulent medicine that claimed to cure various ailments. It is now used to describe any product or remedy that is believed to be ineffective or a scam.

  • For instance, “Don’t fall for those snake oil salesmen, their products never work.”
  • In a discussion about alternative medicine, someone might say, “I think most of those herbal supplements are just snake oil.”
  • A person might comment, “That weight loss pill is just snake oil, it won’t help you lose any weight.”

43. Hinky-dinky

This term is used to describe something that seems suspicious, questionable, or not quite right.

  • For example, “There’s something hinky-dinky about that guy, I don’t trust him.”
  • A person might say, “I walked into that store and immediately felt a hinky-dinky vibe.”
  • In a conversation about a strange situation, someone might comment, “The whole thing seems hinky-dinky, I wouldn’t get involved.”

44. Shonky

This term is used to describe something or someone that is dishonest, unreliable, or of poor quality.

  • For instance, “I wouldn’t buy that shonky used car, it’s bound to break down.”
  • A person might say, “The company’s financial statements look shonky, I don’t trust their numbers.”
  • In a discussion about a sketchy business deal, someone might comment, “That seems like a shonky arrangement, I wouldn’t get involved.”

45. Rinky-dink

This term is used to describe something that is small, unimpressive, or of low quality.

  • For example, “I expected a fancy restaurant, but it turned out to be a rinky-dink diner.”
  • A person might say, “That’s just a rinky-dink operation, they don’t have the resources to handle such a big project.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing event, someone might comment, “The whole thing was so rinky-dink, I wish I hadn’t wasted my time.”

46. Foul play

This term refers to any wrongdoing or illegal activity. It is often used to describe suspicious or dishonest behavior in a situation.

  • For example, in a murder investigation, a detective might say, “We suspect foul play in this case.”
  • In a sports match, a commentator might suggest, “There seems to be some foul play happening on the field.”
  • A person discussing a suspicious business deal might say, “I think there’s foul play involved in this transaction.”

47. Question mark

This term is used to describe a situation or person that raises doubts or uncertainty. It implies that there are unanswered questions or suspicious circumstances.

  • For instance, if someone behaves strangely, you might say, “There’s a big question mark hanging over their actions.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious event, someone might comment, “There are too many question marks surrounding this incident.”
  • A person expressing doubt about a situation might say, “I have a lot of question marks about the legitimacy of this business.”

48. Sneaky Pete

This term refers to someone who is sly, cunning, or deceitful. It implies that the person is trying to conceal their true intentions or engage in suspicious activities.

  • For example, if someone is being secretive, you might say, “They’re acting like a real Sneaky Pete.”
  • In a discussion about a con artist, someone might comment, “That guy is a real Sneaky Pete, always looking for an opportunity to deceive.”
  • A person warning others about a shady individual might say, “Watch out for that Sneaky Pete, he can’t be trusted.”

49. Crooked

This term is used to describe someone or something that is dishonest, corrupt, or involved in illegal activities. It implies a lack of integrity or moral values.

  • For instance, if a politician is involved in a scandal, you might say, “He’s a crooked politician.”
  • In a discussion about a fraudulent business, someone might comment, “That company is known for its crooked practices.”
  • A person expressing distrust in a person or organization might say, “I don’t trust them, they seem really crooked.”

50. Shadowy

This term describes someone or something that is mysterious, secretive, or operates in the shadows. It implies a sense of hidden motives or suspicious behavior.

  • For example, if someone is involved in illegal activities but keeps a low profile, you might say, “He’s a shadowy figure.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious organization, someone might comment, “They have a shadowy presence in the industry.”
  • A person describing a mysterious individual might say, “I saw a shadowy figure lurking in the alleyway.”

51. Shifty-eyed

This term is used to describe someone who appears to be acting suspiciously or untrustworthy, often characterized by their eye movements.

  • For example, “He gave me a shifty-eyed look when I asked him about his whereabouts.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust that shifty-eyed guy hanging around the corner.”
  • In a detective novel, the author might describe a suspect as having “shifty-eyed glances” that made the protagonist suspicious.
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52. Tainted

This term refers to something that is corrupted or contaminated, often with negative or suspicious connotations.

  • For instance, “The tainted food caused an outbreak of illness.”
  • A person might say, “I suspect that there’s something tainted about his business dealings.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might comment, “The politician’s reputation is now tainted.”

53. Scheming

This term is used to describe someone who is engaged in secretive and deceptive planning, often with negative intentions.

  • For example, “She had a scheming look on her face when she proposed the idea.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust his scheming ways; he always has ulterior motives.”
  • In a movie, a character might be described as a “scheming villain” who plots against the protagonist.

54. Devious

This term describes someone who is skillful and secretive in their behavior, often with the intention of deceiving or misleading others.

  • For instance, “He came up with a devious plan to get what he wanted.”
  • A person might say, “I suspect she has some devious motives behind her actions.”
  • In a mystery novel, the detective might describe the suspect as a “devious mastermind.”

55. In question

This term is used to indicate that something or someone is doubtful or uncertain, often raising suspicions or causing uncertainty.

  • For example, “The legitimacy of his claims is in question.”
  • A person might say, “The circumstances surrounding the incident are still in question.”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might cross-examine a witness to put their credibility “in question.”

56. Unreliable

This term is used to describe something or someone that cannot be relied upon or trusted.

  • For example, “I wouldn’t believe anything he says, he’s completely unreliable.”
  • In a discussion about a product, someone might say, “The reviews for this brand are mixed, some say it’s unreliable.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful with that website, it’s known for its unreliable information.”

57. Unconvincing

This word is used to describe something that fails to convince or persuade someone.

  • For instance, “His argument was unconvincing, I wasn’t convinced by his reasoning.”
  • In a debate, a person might say, “I found her evidence to be unconvincing.”
  • Someone might comment, “The sales pitch was unconvincing, I didn’t feel compelled to buy the product.”

58. Foul

This term is used to describe something or someone that is suspicious or dishonest.

  • For example, “There’s something foul about his story, I don’t believe him.”
  • In a discussion about a business, someone might say, “Their practices seem foul, I wouldn’t trust them.”
  • A person might warn, “Watch out for that person, they have a foul reputation.”

59. Paranormal

This word is used to describe something that is beyond normal scientific understanding or explanation, often associated with supernatural or unexplained phenomena.

  • For instance, “The strange occurrences in that house are considered paranormal.”
  • In a conversation about ghosts, someone might say, “I had a paranormal experience last night, I saw a ghost.”
  • A person might comment, “The paranormal investigation revealed some interesting findings.”

60. Disreputable

This term is used to describe something or someone that has a bad reputation or is considered untrustworthy.

  • For example, “That company has a disreputable history, I wouldn’t do business with them.”
  • In a discussion about a person, someone might say, “He’s known for his disreputable behavior.”
  • A person might warn, “Stay away from that neighborhood, it’s known for its disreputable characters.”

61. Unclear

This term is used to describe something that is suspicious or questionable. It implies that there is something hidden or not fully understood about the situation.

  • For example, “The details of his alibi are unclear, which makes me think he might be involved.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious email, someone might say, “The request seems unclear and raises red flags.”
  • A person might express their doubt by saying, “I find his explanation very unclear, I don’t trust it.”

62. Unorthodox

This term refers to something that is not traditional or usual. It can be used to describe behavior or actions that are suspicious or strange.

  • For instance, “His unorthodox methods of making money seem sketchy.”
  • In a discussion about a questionable business practice, someone might say, “Their accounting methods are unorthodox and raise concerns.”
  • A person might express their suspicion by saying, “Her unorthodox behavior at the party made me feel uneasy.”

63. Mysterious

This term is used to describe something that is puzzling or difficult to understand. It implies that there is an element of secrecy or hidden motives involved.

  • For example, “The sudden disappearance of the CEO is very mysterious.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious person, someone might say, “There’s something shady about him, I can’t put my finger on it.”
  • A person might express their doubt by saying, “The circumstances surrounding the incident are very mysterious, I don’t trust it.”

64. Unusual

This term refers to something that is not typical or expected. It can be used to describe behavior or situations that are suspicious or questionable.

  • For instance, “The unusual behavior of the suspect raised suspicions.”
  • In a discussion about a strange occurrence, someone might say, “There’s something dodgy going on in that neighborhood.”
  • A person might express their doubt by saying, “The unusual circumstances of the accident make me question what really happened.”

65. Evasive

This term is used to describe someone who is avoiding giving direct answers or being secretive. It implies that the person is not being fully honest or upfront about something.

  • For example, “He was evasive when I asked him about his whereabouts.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious individual, someone might say, “He’s being cagey about his involvement in the incident.”
  • A person might express their doubt by saying, “Her evasive answers make me question her credibility.”

66. Sinister

This term is often used to describe something or someone that appears evil, threatening, or suspicious.

  • For example, “He had a sinister smile on his face that made me feel uneasy.”
  • In a mystery novel, the detective might say, “There’s something sinister about the way the victim died.”
  • A person might say, “I had a sinister feeling that something bad was going to happen.”

67. Dubitable

This term is used to describe something that is doubtful, questionable, or suspicious.

  • For instance, “His alibi seems dubitable to me.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence presented by the prosecution is dubitable.”
  • A person might say, “I find his story dubitable and think he’s hiding something.”

68. Covert

This term refers to something that is done in a secretive or hidden manner, often implying suspicious or illicit activities.

  • For example, “They conducted covert operations to gather intelligence.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “I work for a covert government agency.”
  • A person might say, “There’s a covert plan to take over the company.”

69. Enigmatic

This term is used to describe something or someone that is mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand.

  • For instance, “Her enigmatic smile left me wondering what she was thinking.”
  • In a riddle, the answer might be “an enigmatic question.”
  • A person might say, “He’s an enigmatic figure who keeps to himself.”

70. Shrouded

This term describes something that is covered or concealed, often implying secrecy or suspicion.

  • For example, “The truth was shrouded in secrecy.”
  • In a ghost story, a character might say, “The haunted house was shrouded in darkness.”
  • A person might say, “His past is shrouded in mystery.”

71. Elusive

This term is used to describe something or someone that is difficult to find, capture, or understand.

  • For example, “The criminal has been elusive, evading capture for months.”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious creature, one might say, “The Loch Ness Monster is an elusive creature that has never been proven to exist.”
  • A person might describe a difficult concept as elusive, saying, “The meaning of life is often elusive and subjective.”

72. Questioning

When something or someone is questioning, it means there is doubt or suspicion surrounding them.

  • For instance, “His sudden disappearance has left us questioning his true intentions.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious event, one might say, “The police are questioning all witnesses to gather more information.”
  • A person might express their doubt by saying, “I find his story quite questioning, there are too many inconsistencies.”