Top 26 Slang For Deceased – Meaning & Usage

Losing a loved one is never easy, and finding the right words to talk about their passing can be a challenge. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with a list of slang terms used to refer to the deceased. Join us as we explore this unique aspect of language and culture surrounding death, shedding light on how we express our emotions and memories in different ways. Get ready to uncover some surprising and touching ways people talk about those who have passed on.

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1. Pushing up daisies

This phrase is a euphemism for being dead and buried in a grave. It implies that the person’s body is decomposing and feeding the flowers above their burial site.

  • For example, someone might say, “When I die, I want to be cremated. I don’t want to be pushing up daisies.”
  • In a conversation about funeral traditions, a person might mention, “In some cultures, it’s customary to plant flowers on the gravesite as a way of honoring the deceased who are pushing up daisies.”
  • Another person might jokingly say, “I don’t want to be pushing up daisies anytime soon. I still have so much to do!”

2. Six feet under

This phrase refers to the traditional burial depth of graves, which is typically six feet. It signifies that the person is deceased and their body has been laid to rest beneath the ground.

  • For instance, someone might remark, “I can’t believe he’s six feet under now. He was such a kind soul.”
  • In a discussion about burial customs, a person might mention, “In some cultures, the deceased are buried at depths greater than six feet to prevent scavenging animals from disturbing the graves.”
  • Another person might say, “When I die, I want to be cremated. I don’t want to end up six feet under.”

3. Kicked the bucket

This phrase is a humorous way of saying that someone has died. It implies that the person has kicked a bucket, as if it were their last action before passing away.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he kicked the bucket. He was so full of life.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, a person might comment, “We never know when we’ll kick the bucket, so it’s important to make the most of every day.”
  • Another person might jokingly say, “I hope I don’t kick the bucket anytime soon. I still have so much left on my bucket list!”

4. Bit the dust

This phrase can refer to both death and failure. It suggests that someone or something has met an unfortunate end or outcome.

  • For instance, someone might say, “After years of struggling, the business finally bit the dust.”
  • In a discussion about historical figures, a person might mention, “Despite his accomplishments, Napoleon eventually bit the dust.”
  • Another person might comment, “When my favorite character in the movie bit the dust, I couldn’t believe it. I was so invested in their story.”

5. Bought the farm

This phrase is a euphemism for dying. It originated from the idea that soldiers who died in battle would be buried in a plot of land, which they “bought” with their lives.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he bought the farm. He was so young.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, a person might remark, “We never know when we’ll buy the farm, so it’s important to make the most of our time.”
  • Another person might say, “I hope I don’t buy the farm anytime soon. I still have so much I want to accomplish in life!”

6. Passed away

This is a euphemistic phrase used to refer to someone who has died. It is a polite and respectful way to talk about someone’s death.

  • For example, “My grandmother passed away last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m sorry to hear that your friend passed away.”
  • In a memorial service, someone might mention, “We gather here today to remember those who have passed away.”

7. Checked out

This slang phrase is used to refer to someone who has died. It implies that the person has left this world or “checked out” of life.

  • For instance, “He checked out last week after a long battle with illness.”
  • A person might say, “It’s sad to hear that she checked out so young.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might comment, “We’re all going to check out eventually.”

8. Gone to a better place

This phrase is used to refer to someone who has died and is believed to be in a better place, typically heaven or an afterlife that is perceived as positive.

  • For example, “After a long struggle with illness, she has gone to a better place.”
  • A person might say, “I take comfort in knowing that he’s gone to a better place now.”
  • In a discussion about grief, someone might mention, “Believing that our loved ones have gone to a better place can bring solace in times of loss.”

9. Met their maker

This phrase is used to refer to someone who has died and is believed to have met their creator or God.

  • For instance, “After a long and fulfilling life, she has finally met her maker.”
  • A person might say, “I hope that when I die, I’ll meet my maker.”
  • In a conversation about faith, someone might comment, “The belief in meeting one’s maker after death is a comforting thought for many.”

10. Rest in peace

This phrase is used to express a wish or hope that the deceased person finds eternal peace in the afterlife.

  • For example, “Rest in peace, dear friend. You will be missed.”
  • A person might say, “I pray that he finds rest in peace after a life of struggle.”
  • In a eulogy, someone might say, “Let us remember and honor the life of the departed, and may they rest in peace.”

11. In a better place

This phrase is often used to refer to someone who has passed away and is believed to be in a better or more peaceful state.

  • For example, when discussing a loved one who has died, someone might say, “I find comfort in knowing they are in a better place now.”
  • In a eulogy, a speaker might say, “Though they are no longer with us, we take solace in the fact that they are in a better place.”
  • When consoling a grieving friend, one might say, “I know it’s difficult, but remember that they are now in a better place, free from pain and suffering.”

12. No longer with us

This phrase is a euphemism used to talk about someone who has died, emphasizing their absence from the living.

  • For instance, when informing someone of a death, one might say, “I’m sorry to inform you that your uncle is no longer with us.”
  • In a memorial service, a speaker might say, “We gather here today to remember and honor those who are no longer with us.”
  • When expressing condolences, one might say, “I’m so sorry for your loss. I know it’s hard when someone is no longer with us.”

13. Took their last breath

This phrase is used to describe the moment of death, emphasizing the act of taking one’s final breath.

  • For example, when discussing a recent death, someone might say, “Unfortunately, they took their last breath yesterday.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might write, “After a long battle with illness, he took his last breath surrounded by his family.”
  • When reflecting on the passing of a loved one, one might say, “It was a peaceful moment when they took their last breath, surrounded by love.”

14. Resting in peace

This phrase is often used to describe someone who has died and is now at peace, emphasizing their state of rest.

  • For instance, when visiting a cemetery, one might say, “May they be resting in peace.”
  • In a sympathy card, one might write, “Wishing you comfort and peace as your loved one rests in peace.”
  • When discussing the loss of a friend, one might say, “I take solace in knowing that they are finally resting in peace.”

15. Passed on

This phrase is a euphemism used to talk about someone who has died, emphasizing the idea of moving on or transitioning to another state.

  • For example, when informing someone of a death, one might say, “I’m sorry to inform you that your grandmother has passed on.”
  • In a eulogy, a speaker might say, “Though they have passed on, their memory lives on in our hearts.”
  • When expressing condolences, one might say, “I’m so sorry for your loss. It’s never easy when someone we love has passed on.”

16. Took the last train

This phrase is a euphemism for someone who has passed away. It implies that the person has embarked on their final journey, similar to taking a train to an unknown destination.

  • For example, “I heard that John took the last train yesterday. May he rest in peace.”
  • In a conversation about a recent death, someone might say, “It’s sad to think that she took the last train so suddenly.”
  • A person mourning the loss of a loved one might reflect, “I can’t believe he’s gone. He took the last train without saying goodbye.”

17. Pushing daisies

This phrase is a playful way to refer to someone who has died. It suggests that the person is now buried in the ground and the daisies on their grave are being pushed up by their body.

  • For instance, “After the accident, he’s now pushing daisies.”
  • In a dark humor conversation, someone might joke, “Well, if I don’t finish this project on time, I’ll be pushing daisies soon.”
  • A person discussing mortality might say, “We all end up pushing daisies eventually, so let’s make the most of our time.”

18. Six feet deep

This phrase refers to someone who is dead and buried six feet under the ground. It is a common expression used to describe the final resting place of the deceased.

  • For example, “He’s now six feet deep in the cemetery.”
  • In a conversation about funeral traditions, someone might mention, “In many cultures, the deceased are laid to rest six feet deep.”
  • A person reflecting on mortality might say, “When I die, I want to be buried six feet deep next to my loved ones.”

19. Called to glory

This phrase is often used in religious contexts to refer to someone who has died and is believed to have ascended to heaven or a higher spiritual realm. It implies that the person’s soul has been called to a glorious afterlife.

  • For instance, “She was a devout believer and has now been called to glory.”
  • In a conversation about a deceased religious leader, someone might say, “He dedicated his life to his faith and has finally been called to glory.”
  • A person discussing the loss of a loved one might find comfort in the idea that they have been called to glory.
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20. Met their end

This phrase is a straightforward way to say that someone has died. It implies that the person has reached the end of their life or journey.

  • For example, “He met his end in a tragic accident.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might reflect, “We all know that one day we will meet our end.”
  • A person discussing the passing of a famous figure might say, “She was a legendary artist who met her end at a young age.”

21. Checked out early

This phrase is used to describe someone who died at a young age or before their expected time. It implies that the person’s life was cut short.

  • For example, “He was a talented musician who checked out early.”
  • A discussion about tragic deaths might include the comment, “So many young artists have checked out early.”
  • Someone might say, “It’s always sad when someone checks out early, especially when they had so much potential.”

22. Six feet below

This phrase refers to the burial of a deceased person. It is derived from the traditional depth at which graves are dug, which is approximately six feet.

  • For instance, “He’s now resting six feet below.”
  • In a conversation about funeral traditions, someone might say, “In many cultures, the deceased are buried six feet below the surface.”
  • Another person might comment, “I find comfort in knowing my loved ones are at peace six feet below.”

23. Pushing up roses

This phrase is a euphemism for being buried in a cemetery. It suggests that the deceased is now beneath the ground, surrounded by roses.

  • For example, “She’s now pushing up roses in the local cemetery.”
  • In a discussion about different burial customs, someone might mention, “Many people choose to be cremated, while others prefer pushing up roses.”
  • A person might say, “I want to be cremated, but my family insists on pushing up roses.”

24. Pushing up daffodils

Similar to “pushing up roses,” this phrase is a euphemism for being buried in a cemetery. It implies that the deceased is now beneath the ground, surrounded by daffodils.

  • For instance, “He’s now pushing up daffodils in the family plot.”
  • In a conversation about different types of flowers at cemeteries, someone might say, “I always make sure to bring daffodils when visiting loved ones who are pushing up daffodils.”
  • Another person might comment, “I find comfort in knowing my parents are resting peacefully, surrounded by daffodils.”

25. Pushing up tulips

Similar to “pushing up roses” and “pushing up daffodils,” this phrase is a euphemism for being buried in a cemetery. It suggests that the deceased is now beneath the ground, surrounded by tulips.

  • For example, “She’s now pushing up tulips in the family burial site.”
  • In a discussion about different types of flowers at gravesites, someone might mention, “Tulips are a popular choice for those who are pushing up tulips.”
  • A person might say, “I want to be cremated, but my family wants me to be pushing up tulips.”

26. Departed this world

This phrase is a euphemism for someone who has died. It is often used to convey a sense of respect or to soften the impact of the news.

  • For instance, when informing someone about a death, one might say, “I’m sorry to inform you that your aunt has departed this world.”
  • In a eulogy, a person might say, “We mourn the loss of our loved one who has departed this world.”
  • When discussing the death of a famous person, a news article might state, “The renowned actor has departed this world, leaving behind a legacy of great performances.”