Top 50 Slang For Killing – Meaning & Usage

Looking to brush up on your knowledge of slang for killing? Whether you’re a true crime enthusiast or just curious about the darker side of language, we’ve got you covered. From common phrases to more obscure terms, our team has compiled a list that will both educate and intrigue you. So, buckle up and get ready to explore the world of slang for killing like never before.

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1. Offing

The term “offing” is often used as a slang for killing someone. It refers to the act of intentionally causing someone’s death.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “He had to eliminate his enemy, so he did the offing himself.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might mention, “There has been an increase in offings in this city.”
  • A detective investigating a murder might say, “We’re looking into possible motives for the offing.”

2. Whack

The term “whack” is a slang for murdering or killing someone. It is often used to describe a violent act of causing someone’s death.

  • For instance, in a gangster movie, a character might say, “He got whacked by a rival gang member.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might ask, “Who whacked him and why?”
  • A news headline might read, “Prominent politician whacked in a shocking assassination.”

3. Ice

The term “ice” is a slang for killing someone. It is often used to describe the act of causing someone’s death, especially in a violent or deliberate manner.

  • For example, in a crime TV show, a detective might say, “We believe he was iced by a professional hitman.”
  • In a conversation about crime statistics, someone might mention, “There has been a rise in gang-related ices in this neighborhood.”
  • A witness to a murder might say, “I saw him get iced right in front of me.”

4. Rub out

The term “rub out” is a slang for killing or murdering someone. It is often used to describe the act of intentionally causing someone’s death.

  • For instance, in a crime novel, a character might say, “He was hired to rub out his former partner.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “The boss ordered a rub out on the rival gang leader.”
  • A detective investigating a homicide might say, “We’re looking for evidence to prove it was a rub out.”

5. Take out

The term “take out” is a slang for killing or eliminating someone. It is often used to describe the act of intentionally causing someone’s death, usually in a planned or premeditated manner.

  • For example, in a spy thriller movie, a character might say, “Our mission is to take out the target before he can reveal our secrets.”
  • In a conversation about assassinations, someone might ask, “Who took him out and why?”
  • A news report might state, “The hitman was hired to take out the high-profile target.”

6. Eliminate

To eliminate someone means to kill them, often in a planned or deliberate manner. It can also refer to removing or getting rid of someone or something completely.

  • For example, a spy might say, “I was assigned to eliminate the target.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might plan to “eliminate the competition.”
  • A military strategist might discuss the need to “eliminate enemy forces” in order to secure a victory.

7. Neutralize

To neutralize someone means to render them incapable of causing harm or to eliminate a threat. It can also refer to stopping or counteracting the effects of something.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We need to neutralize the suspect before he can escape.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might work to “neutralize the effects of a poison.”
  • A military commander might order troops to “neutralize enemy positions” in order to gain an advantage.

8. Put down

To put someone down means to kill them, often in a forceful or violent manner. It can also refer to euthanizing an animal or ending someone’s suffering.

  • For example, a hitman might be hired to “put down a target.”
  • In a dark crime thriller, a character might coldly state, “I’ll put you down if you get in my way.”
  • A veterinarian might discuss the difficult decision to “put down a beloved pet” to end its suffering.

9. Erase

To erase someone means to kill them, often in a way that eliminates any trace or evidence of their existence. It can also refer to completely eliminating or destroying something.

  • For instance, a spy might be ordered to “erase a target” without leaving any evidence behind.
  • In a post-apocalyptic novel, a character might talk about the need to “erase the infected” in order to save humanity.
  • A hacker might discuss the ability to “erase digital footprints” to maintain privacy.

10. Snuff out

To snuff out someone means to kill them, often in a sudden or unexpected manner. It can also refer to extinguishing a flame or putting an end to something.

  • For example, a murderer might sneak up and “snuff out a victim” without warning.
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might argue for stricter laws to “snuff out violence.”
  • A firefighter might talk about the need to “snuff out a fire” to protect lives and property.

11. Dispatch

This term refers to the act of killing someone or something, often with efficiency and precision. It can also be used to mean completing a task or getting rid of something.

  • For example, a spy might say, “I need to dispatch the target before they can escape.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “We need to dispatch this case quickly and catch the killer.”
  • A person discussing a difficult decision might say, “I had to dispatch my old car and buy a new one.”

12. Liquidate

To liquidate someone means to kill them, often in a violent or forceful manner. This term can also be used in a financial context to mean selling off assets or closing down a business.

  • For instance, a mafia boss might say, “We need to liquidate our enemies before they come after us.”
  • In a war movie, a soldier might say, “Our mission is to liquidate the enemy forces and secure the area.”
  • A person discussing financial troubles might say, “I had to liquidate my investments to pay off my debts.”

13. Do in

This slang term is a more casual way of saying “kill.” It can be used in various contexts to refer to the act of ending someone’s life.

  • For example, a gangster might say, “I heard he did in his rival to take control of the territory.”
  • In a crime TV show, a detective might say, “We need to find out who did in the victim and bring them to justice.”
  • A person discussing a violent movie might say, “The main character did in all the bad guys and saved the day.”

14. Knock off

To knock off someone means to kill them, often in a sudden or unexpected manner. This term can also be used to mean completing a task or finishing something.

  • For instance, a hitman might say, “I was hired to knock off the target without leaving any evidence.”
  • In a thriller novel, a character might say, “The killer knocked off all the witnesses to cover their tracks.”
  • A person discussing their to-do list might say, “I need to knock off a few more tasks before the end of the day.”

15. Finish off

To finish off someone means to kill them, often to ensure they are completely dead or to end their suffering. This term can also be used to mean completing or concluding something.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I had to finish off the wounded enemy to prevent them from regrouping.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might say, “The final girl managed to finish off the serial killer and survive.”
  • A person discussing a project might say, “I just need to finish off a few more tasks and then it will be complete.”

16. Wipe out

To “wipe out” means to completely eliminate or destroy something or someone. It is often used to describe the act of killing a large number of people or animals in a single event.

  • For example, “The tsunami wiped out the entire village, leaving no survivors.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I wiped out the enemy team in one swift move.”
  • A person discussing a disease outbreak might say, “The virus has the potential to wipe out entire populations if not controlled.”

17. Hit

In slang terms, “hit” can mean to kill someone. It is often used in the context of organized crime or assassinations.

  • For instance, a gangster might say, “I heard Tony ordered a hit on his rival.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might investigate a murder and say, “Looks like a professional hit.”
  • A person discussing a high-profile assassination might say, “The president’s hit was meticulously planned and executed.”

18. Slay

To “slay” means to kill someone, often with great skill or style. It is commonly used in a figurative sense to describe someone who is exceptionally good at something.

  • For example, a warrior in a fantasy novel might say, “I slay my enemies with my sword.”
  • In a music video, a performer might say, “I’m here to slay the stage with my dance moves.”
  • A person complimenting a chef might say, “This dish is so delicious, it slays my taste buds.”

19. Off

In slang terms, “off” can mean to kill someone. It is a more casual and informal way of expressing the act of killing.

  • For instance, a character in a crime movie might say, “I need to off him before he talks.”
  • In a thriller novel, a spy might be instructed to “off the target quietly and discreetly.”
  • A person discussing a fictional character’s fate might say, “They really offed that main character in a surprising twist.”

20. Cull

To “cull” means to selectively kill a group of animals or people in order to control their population or eliminate certain individuals. It is often used in the context of wildlife management or population control.

  • For example, a hunter might say, “We need to cull the deer population to prevent overpopulation.”
  • In a conservation discussion, a scientist might say, “Culling invasive species is necessary for preserving native biodiversity.”
  • A person discussing a controversial government policy might say, “The decision to cull the wolf population has sparked a heated debate.”

21. Exterminate

To completely destroy or eliminate something or someone. “Exterminate” is often used to describe the act of killing pests or eradicating a population.

  • For example, a pest control company might advertise, “We can exterminate any infestation.”
  • In a sci-fi movie, a character might declare, “We must exterminate the alien invaders before they destroy our planet.”
  • A person discussing a violent video game might say, “I love playing as a character who can exterminate hordes of enemies.”

22. Decimate

To destroy or kill a large proportion of something or someone. “Decimate” originally referred to the Roman practice of executing every tenth soldier as a form of punishment.

  • For instance, a natural disaster might decimate a town, leaving only a few buildings standing.
  • In a war, a military force might aim to decimate the enemy’s ranks.
  • A person discussing the impact of a disease might say, “The pandemic has decimated the global population.”

23. Annihilate

To completely destroy or erase something or someone. “Annihilate” implies a total and irreversible eradication.

  • For example, a powerful bomb could annihilate an entire city.
  • In a sports context, a team might annihilate their opponents, winning by a large margin.
  • A person discussing a debate might say, “The expert speaker completely annihilated his opponent’s arguments.”

24. Extinguish

To put an end to something or someone, often by killing or destroying. “Extinguish” is commonly used to describe the act of putting out a fire.

  • For instance, a firefighter might work to extinguish a raging blaze.
  • In a figurative sense, a person might extinguish someone’s hopes or dreams.
  • A person discussing a conflict might say, “We need to find a peaceful solution to extinguish the violence.”

25. Terminate

To bring to an end or kill something or someone. “Terminate” is often used in a formal or technical context.

  • For example, a contract might be terminated if one party fails to fulfill their obligations.
  • In a science fiction movie, a character might be sent back in time to terminate a dangerous individual.
  • A person discussing a criminal might say, “The police are working to locate and terminate the suspect.”

26. Demolish

To demolish something means to completely destroy or wreck it.

  • For example, “The tornado demolished the entire town, leaving nothing but rubble.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The home team demolished their rivals with a score of 10-0.”
  • A person might use this term figuratively, saying, “Her powerful argument demolished all of his counterpoints.”

27. Obliterate

To obliterate something means to completely remove or destroy it, leaving no trace.

  • For instance, “The explosion obliterated the building, reducing it to ashes.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I obliterated my enemies with a well-placed grenade.”
  • A person might use this term metaphorically, saying, “Her stunning performance obliterated the competition.”

28. Eradicate

To eradicate something means to eliminate or destroy it completely, often with the intention of eradicating a problem or threat.

  • For example, “Efforts to eradicate malaria have greatly reduced its prevalence.”
  • In a conversation about invasive species, one might say, “We need to eradicate these plants before they take over the ecosystem.”
  • A person might use this term metaphorically, saying, “His powerful speech aimed to eradicate ignorance and prejudice.”

29. Annul

To annul something means to declare it invalid or void, effectively canceling or negating its existence.

  • For instance, “The court annulled the marriage due to fraud.”
  • In a legal context, one might say, “The contract was annulled due to a breach of terms.”
  • A person might use this term metaphorically, saying, “His resignation annulled all of his previous promises and commitments.”

30. Cancel

To cancel something means to terminate or end it abruptly, often without the possibility of rescheduling or recovery.

  • For example, “The event was canceled due to inclement weather.”
  • In a conversation about plans, one might say, “Let’s cancel our dinner reservation and cook at home instead.”
  • A person might use this term metaphorically, saying, “The scandal caused the celebrity’s career to be canceled.”

31. Send to the beyond

This phrase is used to describe the act of killing someone, often suggesting a violent or final outcome. It implies sending the person to the afterlife or beyond the realm of the living.

  • For example, a character in a crime novel might say, “He sent his enemies to the beyond without hesitation.”
  • In a discussion about violent video games, someone might comment, “The goal is to send as many enemies to the beyond as possible.”
  • A person recounting a dangerous situation might say, “I was terrified he would send me to the beyond with his knife.”

32. Pop

This slang term is used to describe the act of shooting someone, often with a firearm. It can also refer to killing someone quickly or without warning.

  • For instance, a character in a movie might say, “He popped him in the head and walked away.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might mention, “Gangs are known for popping their rivals.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I heard a loud pop and saw someone fall to the ground.”

33. Drop

This slang term is used to describe the act of killing someone, often suggesting a sudden or unexpected death. It can also refer to causing someone’s death intentionally or accidentally.

  • For example, a character in a crime show might say, “He dropped his target and disappeared into the night.”
  • In a discussion about assassinations, someone might mention, “The hitman was hired to drop a high-profile politician.”
  • A person discussing self-defense might say, “If someone threatens your life, you have the right to drop them to protect yourself.”

34. Demise

This word is used to describe the act of killing or causing someone’s death. It can also refer to the end or downfall of something or someone.

  • For instance, a character in a mystery novel might say, “The detective solved the case and brought about the demise of the criminal.”
  • In a discussion about historical figures, someone might mention, “Many believe that Julius Caesar’s demise was orchestrated by his closest allies.”
  • A person discussing a tragic event might say, “The earthquake led to the demise of an entire city.”

35. Off the mark

This phrase is used to describe an attempt to kill someone that was unsuccessful or inaccurate. It suggests that the intended target was not hit or harmed.

  • For example, a character in an action movie might say, “He shot at me, but he was off the mark.”
  • In a discussion about assassination attempts, someone might mention, “The bullet was off the mark and hit an innocent bystander.”
  • A person recounting a dangerous situation might say, “I’m lucky the shooter was off the mark and missed me.”

36. Bag

To “bag” someone means to kill them. This slang term is often used in reference to hunting or capturing an animal, but can also be used figuratively in relation to killing a person.

  • For example, a hunter might say, “I bagged a 10-point buck on my hunting trip.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “We need to bag the killer before they strike again.”
  • A gangster in a movie might say, “I told my guys to bag him and make it look like an accident.”

37. Whack out

To “whack out” someone means to kill them, usually in a violent or brutal manner. This slang term is often associated with organized crime or gang activity.

  • For instance, a mobster might say, “We need to whack out the informant before he spills our secrets.”
  • In a crime thriller, a hitman might say, “I was hired to whack out the target and make it look like a robbery gone wrong.”
  • A character in a gangster movie might say, “If you cross me, I’ll have my guys whack you out.”

38. Ice out

To “ice out” someone means to kill them, usually by shooting or stabbing. This slang term is often used in reference to premeditated murder or acts of violence.

  • For example, a gang member might say, “We’re going to ice out our rival gang members tonight.”
  • In a crime drama, a detective might say, “The victim was iced out in a drive-by shooting.”
  • A character in a thriller movie might say, “If you double-cross me, I’ll make sure you get iced out.”

39. Smoke

To “smoke” someone means to kill them, often by shooting or strangling. This slang term is commonly used in reference to murder or acts of violence.

  • For instance, a hitman might say, “I was hired to smoke the target and make it look like a suicide.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “The victim was smoked by a professional killer.”
  • A character in a gangster movie might say, “If you betray me, I’ll smoke you and your whole family.”

40. Waste

To “waste” someone means to kill them, often in a violent or sudden manner. This slang term is commonly used in reference to murder or acts of violence.

  • For example, a serial killer might say, “I’m going to waste my next victim and leave no trace behind.”
  • In a crime thriller, a detective might say, “We need to find the killer before they waste another innocent person.”
  • A character in a revenge movie might say, “I’m going to waste every person who wronged me.”

41. Croak

This slang term is often used to refer to someone dying or being killed. It can be used in a literal sense or figuratively.

  • For example, “He croaked after being shot multiple times.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “I’m gonna make him croak for what he did.”
  • Someone discussing a tragic accident might say, “The poor man croaked when his car crashed into a tree.”

42. Take care of

This phrase is often used as a euphemism for killing or eliminating someone. It can imply a sense of finality or resolution.

  • For instance, a mobster might say, “I’ll take care of him so he doesn’t cause any more trouble.”
  • In a spy thriller, a character might be ordered to “take care of” a target.
  • A detective investigating a murder might say, “We need to find out who took care of the victim.”

43. Put away

This slang term can refer to either killing someone or imprisoning them. It suggests removing someone from society or eliminating them as a threat.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We finally put away the notorious gang leader.”
  • In a crime drama, a character might say, “I’ll put him away for good.”
  • A journalist reporting on a trial might write, “The serial killer was put away for life.”

44. Finish

This term can be used to refer to both killing someone or completing a task or mission. It implies a sense of finality or accomplishment.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “We need to finish the enemy before they can regroup.”
  • In a crime thriller, a hitman might say, “I always finish the job.”
  • A coach motivating their team might say, “Let’s finish them off and win this game.”

45. Snuff someone’s candle

This phrase is a euphemism for killing someone, often in a violent or sudden manner. It implies extinguishing someone’s life like blowing out a candle.

  • For example, a detective investigating a murder might say, “The killer snuffed her candle before she could testify.”
  • In a historical drama, a character might say, “He snuffed out the life of his rival in a duel.”
  • A crime writer might describe a brutal murder as “snuffing someone’s candle.”
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46. Send to the happy hunting ground

This slang phrase refers to killing someone and sending them to a peaceful afterlife, often associated with Native American beliefs of a hunting ground in the afterlife.

  • For example, a detective might say, “The suspect was known to send his victims to the happy hunting ground.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might plot to “send their enemies to the happy hunting ground.”
  • A gang member might use this slang to intimidate rivals, saying, “We’ll send you to the happy hunting ground if you cross us.”

47. Send to the gallows

This slang phrase refers to killing someone by hanging, typically as a form of punishment.

  • For instance, a historical account might describe a criminal being “sent to the gallows” for their crimes.
  • In a murder mystery, a suspect might have a motive for wanting to “send their victim to the gallows.”
  • A gangster in a movie might threaten a rival, saying, “I’ll send you to the gallows if you don’t pay up.”

48. Take down

This slang phrase refers to killing someone, often used in a more casual or nonchalant manner.

  • For example, a hitman might say, “I was hired to take down the target.”
  • In a crime thriller, a character might plan to “take down” their adversary to eliminate them as a threat.
  • A soldier might use this slang phrase to describe a successful mission, saying, “We took down the enemy and secured the area.”

49. Slap

This slang term refers to killing someone, often used in a more aggressive or violent context.

  • For instance, a gang member might say, “We slapped that snitch for betraying us.”
  • In a crime drama, a character might threaten to “slap” someone if they don’t comply with their demands.
  • A hitman might describe their method of killing as “slapping” their targets to send a message.
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50. Zap

This slang term refers to killing someone quickly or with a sudden burst of force.

  • For example, a spy might use a high-powered laser to “zap” their target from a distance.
  • In a science fiction story, a character with superhuman abilities might “zap” their enemies with energy blasts.
  • A sniper might use this slang term to describe taking out a target with a single, precise shot, saying, “I zapped him from a mile away.”