Top 27 Slang For Described – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing yourself in the most current and trendy way, having the right slang at your fingertips is key. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for described to keep you in the loop and ahead of the game. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to spice up your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered with the latest and most popular phrases that will have you sounding effortlessly cool in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into the world of hip and trendy language!

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1. Give the lowdown

To “give the lowdown” means to provide all the necessary and important details about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Can you give me the lowdown on the new project?”
  • In a conversation about a restaurant, someone might say, “I can give you the lowdown on their menu and service.”
  • When discussing a movie, a person might ask, “Can you give me the lowdown on the plot and the characters?”

2. Tell it like it is

To “tell it like it is” means to speak in a straightforward and honest manner, without sugarcoating or hiding the truth.

  • For instance, if someone asks for your opinion on a matter, you might say, “I’ll tell it like it is.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might say, “Let’s not beat around the bush, let’s tell it like it is.”
  • When giving advice, someone might say, “I’m just going to tell you like it is.”

3. Paint a vivid picture

To “paint a vivid picture” means to describe something in a way that is very detailed and creates a clear and vivid image in the listener’s mind.

  • For example, “The author’s words painted a vivid picture of the bustling city.”
  • When talking about a vacation, someone might say, “Let me paint a vivid picture of the beautiful beach and crystal-clear water.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, a person might say, “The cinematography in this film really paints a vivid picture of the characters’ emotions.”

4. Get into the nitty-gritty

To “get into the nitty-gritty” means to delve into the detailed and specific aspects of a topic or situation.

  • For instance, if discussing a project, someone might say, “Let’s get into the nitty-gritty of the budget and timeline.”
  • In a conversation about a recipe, a person might say, “Now let’s get into the nitty-gritty of the ingredients and cooking instructions.”
  • When explaining a complex concept, someone might say, “To understand this fully, we need to get into the nitty-gritty of the technical details.”

5. Give a rundown

To “give a rundown” means to provide a summary or overview of a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Can you give me a rundown of the meeting’s main points?”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “I can give you a rundown of the plot and the main characters.”
  • When discussing a sports game, a person might ask, “Can you give me a rundown of the final score and key plays?”

6. Describe in detail

This phrase is used to request a comprehensive and in-depth description or explanation of something.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please describe in detail how you solved the math problem.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might ask, “Can you describe in detail what happened in the final scene?”
  • A detective might instruct a witness, “I need you to describe in detail what the suspect looked like.”

7. Break it down for me

This expression is used to ask someone to explain something in a clear and simplified manner, often breaking it into smaller parts or steps.

  • For instance, a student might ask their teacher, “Can you break down the math problem for me?”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might say, “I don’t understand. Can you break it down for me?”
  • A person might request, “Can you break down the process of filing taxes for me?”

8. Put it into words

This phrase is used to ask someone to express or explain something using language.

  • For example, a therapist might say, “Take a moment to reflect and put your feelings into words.”
  • In a discussion about a work of art, someone might ask, “How would you put the artist’s message into words?”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “I want you to put your thoughts into words and write a short essay.”

9. Give a detailed account

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a complete and detailed description or report of an event or situation.

  • For instance, a journalist might request, “Can you give a detailed account of what happened at the scene?”
  • In a court trial, a lawyer might ask a witness, “Please give a detailed account of the events leading up to the incident.”
  • A historian might say, “To understand the historical context, we need a detailed account of the political climate at that time.”

10. Explain in plain terms

This expression is used to request an explanation that is easy to understand, using simple and straightforward language.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please explain in plain terms how photosynthesis works.”
  • In a conversation about a complex concept, someone might ask, “Can you explain in plain terms what quantum physics is?”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I’ll explain in plain terms why it’s important to eat healthy.”

11. Describe it to me straight

When someone asks you to “describe it to me straight,” they want you to provide a straightforward and honest explanation without any embellishments or sugarcoating.

  • For example, if a friend asks about a movie, you might say, “It’s a romantic comedy, but to describe it to you straight, it’s not very funny and the plot is predictable.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “I need you to describe the current financial situation to me straight so we can make informed decisions.”
  • If a student is struggling to understand a concept, they might ask the teacher, “Can you describe it to me straight? I’m having trouble grasping the concept.”

12. Lay it out for me

When someone asks you to “lay it out for me,” they want you to provide a clear and detailed explanation or description of something.

  • For instance, if a friend asks about your vacation, you might say, “Let me lay it out for you. We stayed at a beautiful beachfront resort, went snorkeling every day, and ate delicious seafood.”
  • In a work presentation, you might say, “Let me lay it out for you. Our sales have been steadily declining, and it’s important that we take immediate action.”
  • If someone is confused about a complex process, they might ask, “Can you lay it out for me step by step? I’m having trouble following.”

13. Give me the scoop

When someone asks you to “give me the scoop,” they want you to provide them with the latest or most interesting information or details about a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if a friend asks about a party, you might say, “Here’s the scoop. It’s at Sarah’s house on Saturday night, and there will be live music and free food.”
  • If someone is curious about a celebrity scandal, they might ask, “Can you give me the scoop on what happened?”
  • In a workplace gossip session, someone might say, “I heard there’s going to be a big announcement tomorrow. Give me the scoop!”

14. Break it down into simple terms

When someone asks you to “break it down into simple terms,” they want you to explain something in a way that is easy to understand, especially if the topic is complex or technical.

  • For instance, if a student is struggling with a math problem, the teacher might say, “Let me break it down into simple terms. First, you need to solve for x, and then you can substitute the value into the equation.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated scientific theory, someone might ask, “Can you break it down into simple terms? I’m having trouble following.”
  • If a friend is confused about a new technology, they might say, “Can you break it down into simple terms? I’m not very tech-savvy.”

15. Describe it accurately

When someone asks you to “describe it accurately,” they want you to provide a detailed and precise explanation or description that is free from errors or inaccuracies.

  • For example, if a coworker asks about a project, you might say, “Let me describe it accurately. We are currently in the planning phase, and our goal is to launch the product by the end of the year.”
  • In a court trial, a witness might be asked, “Can you describe the events accurately? It’s important to provide an unbiased account.”
  • If someone is recounting a funny story, they might say, “Let me describe it accurately. We were at a party, and John slipped on a banana peel and fell flat on his back.”

16. Spill the beans

This phrase is used when someone unintentionally or intentionally reveals information that was supposed to be kept secret.

  • For example, “I can’t believe she spilled the beans about the surprise party!”
  • In a gossip-filled conversation, someone might say, “Come on, spill the beans! What really happened?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You spilled the beans about my crush! Now everyone knows!”

17. Give me the full story

This phrase is used when someone wants to hear all the details and facts about a specific event or situation.

  • For instance, if a friend starts talking about a funny incident, you might say, “Wait, wait! Give me the full story!”
  • In a conversation about a news article, someone might ask, “Can you give me the full story on what happened?”
  • A journalist might request, “I need you to give me the full story for my report.”

18. Paint a verbal picture

This phrase is used when someone wants to create a visual image or convey a clear understanding of something through their words.

  • For example, a tour guide might say, “Let me paint a verbal picture of the breathtaking view from the top.”
  • In a storytelling session, someone might say, “He has an amazing ability to paint a verbal picture of his adventures.”
  • A teacher might instruct, “I want you to paint a verbal picture of the scene in your creative writing assignment.”

19. Describe in a nutshell

This phrase is used when someone wants a brief or condensed description of a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone asks about a movie, you might say, “It’s a romantic comedy in a nutshell.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might be asked, “Can you describe your previous work experience in a nutshell?”
  • A friend might say, “We don’t have much time, so describe the plot of the book in a nutshell.”

20. Break it down Barney style

This phrase is used when someone wants a step-by-step or simplified explanation of a complex concept or task.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Alright class, let’s break it down Barney style so everyone can understand.”
  • In a technical training session, an instructor might say, “I’m going to break it down Barney style, so even beginners can follow along.”
  • A friend might ask, “I’m not familiar with this topic, can you break it down Barney style for me?”

21. Give the 411

This phrase means to give someone all the necessary information or details about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Can you give me the 411 on the new project?”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might ask, “Can you give me the 411 on the dress code?”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll give you the 411 on the latest gossip.”

22. Break it down to brass tacks

This phrase means to explain or describe something in a straightforward and concise way, focusing on the most important details.

  • For instance, “Let’s break it down to brass tacks – we need to increase our sales.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Can you break down the budget to brass tacks?”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “I’m going to break down this complex topic to brass tacks so you can understand it better.”

23. Give the skinny

This phrase means to give someone the most important or essential information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Can you give me the skinny on the new restaurant in town?”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might ask, “Can you give me the skinny on the plot?”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll give you the skinny on the upcoming meeting.”

24. Describe it to a T

This phrase means to describe something in a very accurate and precise manner, leaving no room for interpretation or confusion.

  • For instance, “She described the suspect to a T, and the police were able to make an arrest.”
  • In a book review, someone might say, “The author described the setting to a T, making it come alive in the reader’s mind.”
  • A chef might tell their assistant, “Make sure you describe the plating to a T – attention to detail is crucial.”

25. Break it down into bite-sized pieces

This phrase means to break down or explain something in small and easily understandable parts or steps.

  • For example, “I’ll break down the math problem into bite-sized pieces so you can understand it.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, someone might say, “Let’s break down the recipe into bite-sized pieces for easier comprehension.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “I’ll break down the lesson into bite-sized pieces to make it more manageable.”

26. Paint a clear picture

This phrase is used to emphasize the need for providing a thorough and vivid description of something. It is often used to ensure that the listener or reader can fully understand and visualize the situation or information being conveyed.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “When writing your essay, make sure to paint a clear picture of the setting and characters.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might say, “Let me paint a clear picture of how our new product will revolutionize the market.”
  • A journalist might write, “The witness painted a clear picture of the events leading up to the crime.”

27. Give the blow-by-blow

This phrase is often used to describe providing a detailed and comprehensive account of an event or situation, including all the specific details and actions involved. It implies a thorough and exhaustive description.

  • For instance, a sports commentator might say, “Let’s go to our reporter on the field for the blow-by-blow of the game.”
  • During a courtroom trial, a witness might be asked to give the blow-by-blow of an incident they witnessed.
  • A journalist might write, “In his memoir, the author gives the blow-by-blow account of his journey through war-torn countries.”
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