Top 73 Slang For Diagnosis – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing health issues, it’s essential to be on the same page. That’s why we’ve gathered a list of the most common slang terms used in the world of diagnosis. Whether you’re a medical professional or just curious about the lingo, this article is sure to enlighten and inform you on the language of diagnosis. Stay tuned to brush up on your medical vocabulary and stay in the know!

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1. DX

DX is a shorthand term for “diagnosis.” It is commonly used in medical settings to refer to the process of identifying a patient’s condition or illness.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I need to review your test results before I can make a DX.”
  • A nurse might write in a patient’s chart, “Patient presenting with symptoms of fever and cough. Further DX required.”
  • A medical student might ask their professor, “What are the key steps in making an accurate DX?”

2. Eval

Eval is short for “evaluation,” which is the process of assessing or examining a patient’s condition or symptoms. It is often used in medical discussions or reports.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “I need to perform a thorough eval to determine the cause of your symptoms.”
  • A psychiatrist might write in a patient’s record, “Initial eval suggests symptoms consistent with depression.”
  • A medical researcher might present their findings, saying, “Our study involved the eval of over 500 patients with chronic pain.”

3. Workup

Workup refers to the series of tests, examinations, or evaluations performed to arrive at a diagnosis. It is commonly used in medical settings to describe the process of investigating a patient’s symptoms or condition.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to start the workup to determine the cause of your abdominal pain.”
  • A nurse might document in a patient’s chart, “Ordered lab work as part of the diagnostic workup.”
  • A medical student might ask their attending physician, “What’s the typical timeline for completing a workup?”

4. ID

ID is a slang term for “identification” and is often used in medical discussions to refer to the process of identifying a specific disease or condition.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to rule out any infectious diseases as the ID for the patient’s symptoms.”
  • A medical researcher might write in a study report, “The ID of the rare genetic disorder was confirmed through genetic testing.”
  • A healthcare provider might ask a patient, “Do you have any known ID allergies or conditions?”

5. Prognosis

Prognosis refers to the predicted outcome or course of a disease or condition. It is often used in medical discussions to describe the expected progression or outcome of a patient’s health.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient’s prognosis is favorable with early intervention.”
  • A nurse might document in a patient’s chart, “Discussed the prognosis with the patient and family.”
  • A medical researcher might present their findings, saying, “Our study aimed to improve the accuracy of prognosis for patients with heart failure.”

6. Code

A code used to represent a specific diagnosis or medical condition. These codes are used in medical records, billing, and insurance claims to ensure accurate documentation and communication.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I need to assign the appropriate code for this patient’s diagnosis.”
  • In a medical coding class, a student might ask, “What’s the code for diabetes?”
  • A medical biller might say, “I’m responsible for reviewing the codes to ensure they match the doctor’s diagnosis.”

7. Findings

The results or observations from a medical examination or test that contribute to the diagnosis of a patient’s condition. These findings can include physical symptoms, laboratory test results, imaging studies, and other diagnostic information.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “Based on the patient’s physical findings, I suspect they have a respiratory infection.”
  • In a medical report, a clinician might document, “The findings of the MRI show a herniated disc.”
  • A medical student might discuss their findings with a colleague, saying, “I noticed some abnormal lab results that could indicate a thyroid disorder.”

8. Report

A document that summarizes a patient’s medical history, examination findings, diagnostic test results, and treatment plan. Medical reports are used to communicate information between healthcare providers and serve as a record of a patient’s care.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I’ll write up a report detailing my assessment and recommendations.”
  • In a hospital setting, a nurse might submit a report to the next shift, saying, “Here’s a report on the patient’s condition and any changes that occurred.”
  • A patient might request a copy of their medical report to share with a specialist or for their personal records.

9. Diag

The identification of a disease or condition based on a patient’s symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. A diagnosis is an essential step in providing appropriate medical care and developing a treatment plan.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “I need to run some tests to confirm the diagnosis.”
  • In a medical setting, a nurse might document a diagnosis in a patient’s chart, saying, “The doctor’s diagnosis is pneumonia.”
  • A patient might seek a second opinion if they are unsure about a diagnosis or treatment plan.

10. Assessment

A systematic evaluation of a patient’s condition, including their symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic test results. The assessment helps healthcare providers determine a diagnosis and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Based on my assessment, I believe the patient has a viral infection.”
  • In a medical setting, a nurse might assist with the assessment by gathering the patient’s vital signs and documenting their symptoms.
  • A medical student might discuss their assessment with a preceptor, saying, “I’ve completed my assessment and would like to discuss my findings.”

11. Label

To label something is to assign a tag or category to it, often for the purpose of identification or organization. In the context of diagnosis, a label refers to the specific diagnosis or condition assigned to a patient.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to label this patient’s symptoms as anxiety disorder.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might argue, “Labels can be stigmatizing and limit understanding of a person’s unique experiences.”
  • A patient might express frustration, “I feel like doctors are too quick to put a label on me without fully understanding my symptoms.”

12. Check-up

A check-up is a routine examination or visit to a healthcare professional to assess one’s overall health and detect any potential issues or conditions. It typically involves a series of tests and evaluations.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I’m taking my child to the pediatrician for a check-up.”
  • A doctor might recommend, “It’s important to schedule regular check-ups to catch any health problems early.”
  • A person might mention, “I always feel relieved after a check-up knowing that everything is in good shape.”

13. Screen

To screen is to assess or evaluate someone for a particular condition or disease. In the context of diagnosis, screening refers to the process of testing or examining individuals who may be at risk or showing symptoms.

  • For example, a healthcare provider might say, “We need to screen this patient for diabetes.”
  • In a conversation about cancer prevention, someone might mention, “Regular screenings can help detect cancer at an early stage.”
  • A person might express concern, “I’m nervous about getting screened for genetic disorders.”

14. Diagnose

To diagnose is to identify and determine the nature or cause of a medical condition or disease. It involves analyzing symptoms, conducting tests, and making a professional judgment about the patient’s condition.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “Based on the test results, I can diagnose you with strep throat.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might argue, “It’s important to destigmatize seeking help and getting diagnosed.”
  • A patient might express relief, “Finally getting diagnosed explained so much about my chronic pain.”

15. Test results

Test results refer to the outcome or findings of medical tests conducted to assess or diagnose a condition. They provide valuable information for healthcare professionals to determine the appropriate course of treatment.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The test results indicate that you have a vitamin deficiency.”
  • In a conversation about fertility, someone might mention, “Waiting for test results can be nerve-wracking.”
  • A person might express frustration, “I wish the doctor would call with my test results already.”

16. Meds

This term is a shortened version of “medications” and is commonly used to refer to prescription drugs or other forms of medicine.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my meds from the pharmacy.”
  • A person discussing their treatment plan might mention, “My doctor prescribed me some new meds to help manage my symptoms.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you take any meds for your condition?”

17. Prog

This term is short for “progress” and is often used to refer to the advancement or improvement of a condition or disease.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “The patient is showing positive prog in their recovery.”
  • A person discussing their treatment might note, “I’ve been tracking my prog with a journal to see how I’m doing.”
  • Someone might ask, “Have you noticed any prog since starting your new medication?”

18. Prognose

This term is a slang version of “prognosis,” which refers to the predicted outcome or course of a disease or condition.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient’s prognose is favorable, and they are expected to make a full recovery.”
  • A person discussing their health might say, “I’m waiting for the doctor to give me the prognose for my condition.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s the prognose for someone with that disease?”

19. Diagnosing

This term refers to the act of determining or identifying a disease or condition through medical examination and evaluation.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We are currently in the process of diagnosing the patient’s symptoms.”
  • A person discussing their experience might say, “The diagnosing took a while because my symptoms were unusual.”
  • Someone might ask, “What tests are typically involved in the diagnosing of that disease?”

20. Diagnosed

This term is used to indicate that someone has been officially diagnosed with a particular disease or condition.

  • For example, a person might say, “I was diagnosed with diabetes last year.”
  • Someone discussing their health journey might note, “Getting diagnosed was a turning point in my treatment.”
  • Another might ask, “How did you feel when you were first diagnosed with that condition?”

21. Eval and treat

This term refers to the process of assessing and managing a patient’s condition. It is often used in medical settings to describe the steps taken to diagnose and treat a patient.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Let’s eval and treat this patient’s symptoms to determine the underlying cause.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might write, “Patient presented with abdominal pain. Eval and treat for possible appendicitis.”
  • A healthcare provider might discuss a treatment plan, saying, “We will eval and treat the patient’s high blood pressure with medication and lifestyle changes.”

22. Dx and Tx

This abbreviation is commonly used in medical settings to refer to the process of diagnosing a condition and providing appropriate treatment.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to perform further tests to confirm the Dx and Tx plan.”
  • In a medical chart, a nurse might write, “Patient admitted for evaluation. Pending Dx and Tx.”
  • A healthcare provider might discuss a patient’s case, saying, “We have completed the Dx and Tx process and are now monitoring the patient’s progress.”

23. Labs

This term refers to medical tests that are conducted in a laboratory to analyze samples such as blood, urine, or tissue. “Labs” is often used as a shorthand way to refer to these tests.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to run some labs to check for any abnormalities in your bloodwork.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might write, “Patient’s labs came back within normal range.”
  • A healthcare provider might discuss a patient’s treatment plan, saying, “Based on the labs, we will adjust the medication dosage.”

24. Imaging

This term refers to the use of various techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRIs to create visual representations of the inside of the body. “Imaging” is often used as a general term to describe these diagnostic procedures.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to schedule an imaging test to get a better look at your injury.”
  • In a medical chart, a nurse might write, “Patient underwent imaging to assess the extent of the disease.”
  • A healthcare provider might discuss the results of an imaging test, saying, “Based on the imaging, we can see a fracture in the patient’s leg.”

25. Biopsy

This term refers to the procedure of removing a small sample of tissue from the body for examination under a microscope. A biopsy is often performed to diagnose or determine the nature of a disease or condition.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to perform a biopsy to determine if the tumor is cancerous.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might write, “Patient underwent a skin biopsy to assess the presence of a skin condition.”
  • A healthcare provider might discuss the biopsy results, saying, “The biopsy confirmed the presence of abnormal cells, indicating a malignant tumor.”

26. Path

This term refers to the study of diseases and their effects on the body. In the context of diagnosis, “path” is often used to refer to the underlying cause or nature of a medical condition.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to determine the path of this patient’s symptoms.”
  • In a medical discussion, someone might ask, “What is the likely path of this disease?”
  • A patient might express concern by saying, “I’m worried about the path my condition is taking.”

27. Chart review

This term refers to the process of reviewing a patient’s medical chart or records to gather information about their medical history and previous treatments. It is often done as part of the diagnostic process to gain insights into a patient’s condition.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “I need to do a chart review before we can make a diagnosis.”
  • In a medical setting, a nurse might ask, “Have you completed the chart review for this patient?”
  • A medical student might learn about the importance of chart reviews by saying, “Chart reviews provide valuable insights into a patient’s medical journey.”

28. Consult

This term refers to seeking advice or input from another medical professional, often a specialist, regarding a patient’s diagnosis or treatment plan. It involves a collaboration between healthcare providers to ensure the best possible care for the patient.

  • For example, a primary care physician might say, “I’m going to consult with a cardiologist about your symptoms.”
  • In a hospital setting, a doctor might request a consult by saying, “I need a neurology consult for this patient.”
  • A medical team might discuss the need for a consult by saying, “Let’s bring in a specialist to provide a fresh perspective.”

29. Rule out

This term is used to describe the process of eliminating or ruling out a particular diagnosis or condition. It involves conducting tests or evaluations to confirm or exclude the presence of a certain disease or condition.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to rule out any underlying infections.”
  • In a discussion about a patient’s symptoms, a healthcare provider might suggest, “Let’s rule out any potential allergies.”
  • A patient might express relief by saying, “I’m glad we could rule out a serious condition.”

30. Symptom check

This term refers to the process of assessing and analyzing a patient’s symptoms to determine their possible underlying cause. It involves gathering information about the nature, duration, and severity of the symptoms to guide the diagnostic process.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Let’s do a symptom check to narrow down the possibilities.”
  • In a medical discussion, a healthcare provider might ask, “Have you done a thorough symptom check for this patient?”
  • A patient might describe their experience by saying, “I went through a symptom check to help the doctor understand my condition.”

31. Case study

A case study is a detailed examination of a particular medical case or patient. It involves analyzing symptoms, medical history, test results, and treatment options to gain a better understanding of the condition.

  • For example, a medical student might say, “I have to write a case study on a patient with a rare genetic disorder.”
  • A doctor might present a case study at a conference, saying, “This case study highlights the challenges of diagnosing a rare form of cancer.”
  • A researcher might publish a case study in a medical journal, stating, “This case study provides insights into the effectiveness of a new treatment for diabetes.”

32. Differential

Differential refers to a list of potential diagnoses that are considered when trying to determine the cause of a patient’s symptoms. It involves comparing and contrasting various conditions based on their symptoms, risk factors, and test results.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to consider a wide differential to properly diagnose this patient.”
  • A medical student might create a differential for a hypothetical patient, saying, “Based on the symptoms, the differential includes pneumonia, bronchitis, and asthma.”
  • A doctor might discuss a differential with a colleague, stating, “I think we should add lupus to the differential for this patient.”

33. PE

PE stands for physical examination, which involves a doctor or healthcare provider assessing a patient’s body systems and overall health. It includes observing, palpating, and listening to various parts of the body to gather information and make a diagnosis.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I will start with a thorough PE to assess the patient’s condition.”
  • A nurse might document a PE in a patient’s medical record, stating, “PE findings include normal heart sounds and decreased breath sounds.”
  • A medical student might practice performing a PE on a classmate, saying, “Let’s take turns performing a PE to practice our skills.”

34. Hx

Hx is an abbreviation for medical history, which refers to a patient’s past and current health conditions, surgeries, medications, allergies, and other relevant information. It helps healthcare providers understand a patient’s health background and make informed decisions about their diagnosis and treatment.

  • For instance, a doctor might ask a patient, “Can you provide a detailed Hx of your medical conditions?”
  • A nurse might document a patient’s Hx in their medical record, stating, “Patient reports a family Hx of heart disease.”
  • A medical student might review a patient’s Hx before presenting their case, saying, “The patient’s Hx includes hypertension, diabetes, and asthma.”

35. SOAP note

SOAP note is a widely used documentation format in healthcare. It stands for Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan. It is a structured way of organizing patient information, including their symptoms, physical findings, diagnosis, and treatment plan.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I need to write a SOAP note for this patient’s visit.”
  • A nurse might document a SOAP note in a patient’s medical record, stating, “S: Patient complains of abdominal pain. O: Tenderness in the lower right quadrant. A: Suspected appendicitis. P: Order abdominal ultrasound.”
  • A medical student might practice writing a SOAP note for a simulated patient, saying, “Let’s start with the subjective part of the SOAP note by asking about the patient’s chief complaint.”

36. Chart

A chart refers to a patient’s medical record, which contains information about their medical history, diagnoses, treatments, and other relevant information. It is used by healthcare professionals to track a patient’s health status and make informed decisions about their care.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Let me check the patient’s chart to see their previous test results.”
  • A nurse might ask a colleague, “Have you updated the patient’s chart with the latest vital signs?”
  • A medical student might be instructed, “Review the patient’s chart before presenting their case.”

37. Chief complaint

The chief complaint refers to the main reason a patient seeks medical attention. It is the primary symptom or problem that the patient is experiencing and wants to address with a healthcare professional.

  • For instance, a patient might say, “My chief complaint is severe abdominal pain.”
  • A doctor might ask, “What is your chief complaint today?”
  • In a medical report, the chief complaint might be documented as “Patient presents with a chief complaint of shortness of breath.”

38. Referral

A referral is a request made by one healthcare provider to another for an opinion, evaluation, or treatment of a specific condition or problem. It is often done when the referring provider requires the expertise of another specialist to manage a patient’s care.

  • For example, a primary care doctor might refer a patient to a cardiologist for further evaluation of a heart condition.
  • A referring physician might write in a referral letter, “Please see this patient for a consultation regarding their persistent symptoms.”
  • A specialist might receive a referral and say, “I will review the patient’s medical history and schedule a consultation.”

39. Discharge summary

A discharge summary is a document that outlines the patient’s condition, treatment, and follow-up plan after being discharged from a healthcare facility. It provides a summary of the patient’s stay and is often sent to the primary care physician for continuity of care.

  • For instance, a discharge summary might include information about the patient’s diagnosis, medications, and any recommended lifestyle changes.
  • A doctor might write in a discharge summary, “Patient was discharged in stable condition with instructions to follow up in two weeks.”
  • A nurse might review a discharge summary and note, “Patient’s family has been educated on the post-discharge care plan.”

40. Admit

To admit refers to the process of admitting a patient to a hospital for further evaluation, treatment, or observation. It involves the formal registration of the patient and their assignment to a hospital unit or bed.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to admit the patient for further tests.”
  • A nurse might inform a patient, “The doctor has decided to admit you to the hospital.”
  • A hospital administrator might handle the admission process and say, “Please fill out these forms before we can officially admit you.”

41. Dispo

This term refers to the plan or course of action for a patient after their medical evaluation. It often indicates whether the patient will be admitted to the hospital, discharged home, or transferred to another facility.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient’s dispo is to be discharged with instructions for follow-up.”
  • In a medical record, the dispo might be noted as “patient admitted to the ICU.”
  • During a team discussion, a nurse might ask, “What’s the dispo for the patient in room 302?”

42. Follow-up

This term refers to the subsequent medical appointments or interventions that are scheduled after an initial evaluation. It is often used to indicate the need for ongoing monitoring or treatment.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “The patient should schedule a follow-up appointment in two weeks.”
  • A nurse might document, “Patient instructed to follow-up with primary care physician for medication refill.”
  • During a phone call, a receptionist might ask, “Are you calling to schedule a follow-up appointment?”

43. Rounds

This term refers to the regular visits made by medical professionals to evaluate and discuss patient cases. It often involves a team of healthcare providers, such as doctors, nurses, and students, who review and make decisions about patient care.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Let’s start rounds on the medical floor.”
  • During rounds, a nurse might report, “Patient in room 305 is complaining of pain.”
  • A medical student might ask, “Can I join the rounds to learn more about the patient’s condition?”

44. Ddx

This term refers to the process of considering and evaluating different possible diagnoses for a patient’s symptoms or condition. It involves analyzing the available information, conducting tests, and ruling out potential causes.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to generate a Ddx for this patient’s abdominal pain.”
  • During a discussion, a medical student might suggest, “I think we should include gastrointestinal disorders in the Ddx.”
  • A nurse might document, “Ddx includes pneumonia, bronchitis, and asthma.”

45. Pathology

This term refers to the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of bodily fluids, tissues, and organs. It involves analyzing samples under a microscope and conducting laboratory tests to identify the presence and characteristics of diseases.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The pathology report confirmed the presence of cancer.”
  • During a discussion, a pathologist might explain, “Pathology plays a crucial role in determining the appropriate treatment for a patient.”
  • A medical student might ask, “Can I observe a pathology procedure to learn more about disease diagnosis?”

46. Rule-out

In medical terms, “rule-out” refers to the process of excluding or eliminating a particular diagnosis or condition. It is often used when a specific diagnosis is suspected but not yet confirmed.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to rule out appendicitis before we can proceed with further tests.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might write, “Patient presented with abdominal pain, rule-out gastroenteritis.”
  • A healthcare professional might discuss a patient’s case by saying, “We’re currently ruling out various causes for the symptoms.”

47. Confirmed

When a diagnosis is “confirmed,” it means that it has been verified or established as true. This term is used when a specific condition or disease has been definitively identified.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “The test results confirmed the presence of a bacterial infection.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might write, “Patient’s condition deteriorated, confirmed sepsis.”
  • A healthcare professional might discuss a patient’s progress by stating, “The latest tests have confirmed the initial diagnosis.”

48. Suspected

When a diagnosis is “suspected,” it means that it is believed or presumed to be the case based on the presenting symptoms or initial assessment. This term is used when a specific condition is strongly suspected but not yet confirmed.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Based on the patient’s symptoms, we suspect a viral infection.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might write, “Patient presented with respiratory distress, suspected pneumonia.”
  • A healthcare professional might discuss a patient’s case by stating, “There are several suspected causes for the symptoms, but further tests are needed for confirmation.”

49. R/O

“R/O” is an abbreviation for “rule out.” It is commonly used in medical documentation to indicate the need to exclude or eliminate a particular diagnosis or condition.

  • For instance, a doctor might write, “Patient presents with chest pain, R/O myocardial infarction.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might document, “Patient’s symptoms consistent with appendicitis, R/O other causes.”
  • A healthcare professional might discuss a patient’s case by saying, “We’re currently considering and R/O various possibilities for the symptoms.”

50. Stat

In medical slang, “stat” is an abbreviation for “immediately” or “urgent.” It is used to indicate that something needs to be done quickly or without delay.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to perform an MRI stat to rule out any neurological issues.”
  • In a medical report, a nurse might write, “Patient’s condition deteriorated, administer medication stat.”
  • A healthcare professional might discuss a patient’s case by stating, “The patient’s test results came back abnormal, and we need to address the issue stat.”

51. Abnormal

This term is used to describe something that deviates from what is considered normal or typical.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The test results came back and they show abnormal levels of a certain hormone.”
  • A person discussing medical conditions might say, “Having an abnormal heart rate can be a sign of an underlying issue.”
  • In a conversation about lab results, someone might ask, “What does it mean if my white blood cell count is abnormal?”

52. Normal

This term is used to describe something that is considered typical or within the expected range.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “Your blood pressure is normal, which is a good sign.”
  • A person discussing test results might ask, “Are these levels within the normal range?”
  • In a conversation about health, someone might say, “It’s important to maintain a normal body temperature.”

53. Screened

This term refers to the process of testing or examining someone for a specific condition or disease.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We recommend that all adults get screened for high blood pressure.”
  • A person discussing preventive healthcare might say, “I scheduled a screening to check for early signs of cancer.”
  • In a conversation about public health, someone might ask, “Have you been screened for STDs?”

54. Symptomatic

This term is used to describe someone who is showing signs or symptoms of a particular condition or disease.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “Based on your symptoms, it seems like you are symptomatic of the flu.”
  • A person discussing a medical condition might ask, “What are the common symptoms of being symptomatic?”
  • In a conversation about COVID-19, someone might say, “It’s important to get tested if you are symptomatic.”

55. Asymptomatic

This term is used to describe someone who does not show any signs or symptoms of a particular condition or disease, even though they may be infected.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Some people with COVID-19 can be asymptomatic.”
  • A person discussing a medical condition might ask, “Can you still spread the disease if you are asymptomatic?”
  • In a conversation about testing, someone might say, “It’s important to identify asymptomatic carriers to prevent the spread of the virus.”

56. Patho

This refers to the study of disease and the changes that occur in the body as a result. “Patho” is often used as a shortened form of “pathology” in medical slang.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I need to review the patho report before making a diagnosis.”
  • In a discussion about medical school, a student might mention, “Patho class is one of the toughest subjects.”
  • A nurse might ask a colleague, “Have you seen the patho slides for the patient in room 302?”

57. Radiology

Radiology is a medical specialty that uses imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs to diagnose and treat diseases. In slang, “radiology” is often referred to as “imaging.”

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to send the patient to radiology for an MRI.”
  • In a conversation about medical tests, a patient might ask, “Do I need to go to imaging for this?”
  • A radiologist might discuss a challenging case and say, “I saw something unusual on the imaging for that patient.”

58. Neuro

This refers to the branch of medicine that deals with disorders of the nervous system. “Neuro” is a commonly used abbreviation for “neurology” in medical slang.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I’m referring the patient to neuro for further evaluation.”
  • In a discussion about medical specialties, a student might mention, “I’m considering going into neuro.”
  • A nurse might ask a colleague, “Have you seen the neuro consult for the patient in room 405?”

59. Cardio

This refers to the branch of medicine that deals with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. “Cardio” is a commonly used abbreviation for “cardiology” in medical slang.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “I’m scheduling the patient for a cardio consult.”
  • In a conversation about heart health, a patient might ask, “What can I do to improve my cardio?”
  • A nurse might discuss a patient’s condition and say, “The cardio team is closely monitoring the patient’s progress.”

60. GI

This refers to the branch of medicine that deals with disorders of the digestive system. “GI” is a commonly used abbreviation for “gastroenterology” in medical slang.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I need to consult with GI regarding the patient’s symptoms.”
  • In a discussion about digestive issues, a patient might ask, “Should I see a GI specialist?”
  • A nurse might discuss a patient’s diet and say, “The GI team has recommended a low-fiber meal plan.”

61. Respiratory

This term is short for “respiratory” and is used to refer to any condition or illness that affects the respiratory system, which includes the lungs, airways, and breathing muscles.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been struggling with a respy infection for the past week.”
  • A doctor might diagnose a patient with “respy issues” if they are experiencing symptoms like coughing,“respy issues” if they are experiencing symptoms like coughing, wheezing, or shortness of breath.
  • In a conversation about common colds and flu, someone might mention, “Respy illnesses tend to be more common during the winter months.”

62. Infectious

This term is used to describe any disease or condition that can be transmitted from one person to another through direct or indirect contact.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I caught an infectious bug from my coworker.”
  • A doctor might diagnose a patient with an “infectious disease” if they are exhibiting symptoms like fever,“infectious disease” if they are exhibiting symptoms like fever, rash, or fatigue.
  • In a discussion about public health, someone might mention, “It’s important to practice good hygiene to prevent the spread of infectious illnesses.”

63. Chronic

This term is used to describe any condition or illness that persists over a long period of time, typically three months or more.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have chronic back pain that has been ongoing for years.”
  • A doctor might diagnose a patient with a “chronic condition” if they are experiencing symptoms that are persistent and recurring.
  • In a conversation about healthcare, someone might mention, “Managing chronic illnesses often requires a combination of medication and lifestyle changes.”

64. Acute

This term is used to describe any condition or illness that has a sudden and severe onset, typically lasting for a short period of time.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had an acute migraine attack yesterday.”
  • A doctor might diagnose a patient with an “acute infection” if they are experiencing symptoms like high fever and intense pain.
  • In a discussion about injuries, someone might mention, “Acute injuries often require immediate medical attention to prevent further complications.”

65. Primary

This term is used to describe the main or most important aspect or source of a condition or illness.

  • For example, someone might say, “The primary cause of my allergies is pollen.”
  • A doctor might identify a “primary symptom” as the main indicator or characteristic of a particular condition.
  • In a conversation about treatment options, someone might mention, “Addressing the primary issue is crucial for effective management of the disease.”

66. Secondary

This term is used to describe cancer that has spread from its original location to other parts of the body. It refers to the secondary tumors that develop in these new areas.

  • For example, a doctor might explain, “The cancer has metastasized, and we have found secondary tumors in the liver.”
  • A patient might ask, “What are the treatment options for secondary breast cancer?”
  • In a support group, someone might share, “I was initially diagnosed with lung cancer, but now it’s become secondary in my brain.”

67. Terminal

This term is used to describe a disease or condition that cannot be cured and is expected to result in death. It indicates that the condition has reached its final stage and there are no further treatment options available.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “Unfortunately, your father’s cancer is terminal.”
  • A patient might ask, “How long can someone live with a terminal illness?”
  • In a discussion about palliative care, someone might mention, “Supporting patients with terminal conditions is crucial for their comfort and quality of life.”

68. Metastatic

This term is used to describe cancer that has spread from its original location to other parts of the body. It refers to the development of secondary tumors in these new areas.

  • For example, a doctor might explain, “The breast cancer has become metastatic, and we have found tumors in the bones.”
  • A patient might ask, “What are the treatment options for metastatic melanoma?”
  • In a support group, someone might share, “I was initially diagnosed with ovarian cancer, but now it has become metastatic in my lungs.”

69. Recurrent

This term is used to describe a disease or condition that has returned after a period of remission or apparent recovery. It indicates that the disease has reappeared or resurfaced.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “The cancer has recurred in the same location.”
  • A patient might ask, “What are the risk factors for recurrent infections?”
  • In a discussion about treatment outcomes, someone might mention, “Early detection is key to preventing recurrent episodes of the disease.”

70. Incurable

This term is used to describe a disease or condition that cannot be cured or completely eliminated. It indicates that there are no known medical treatments or interventions that can fully eradicate the disease.

  • For example, a doctor might explain, “Unfortunately, your condition is incurable.”
  • A patient might ask, “Is there anything I can do to manage the symptoms of an incurable disease?”
  • In a discussion about medical research, someone might mention, “Finding a cure for incurable diseases is a major focus of scientific investigation.”

71. Progressive

Used to describe a condition or disease that is advancing or deteriorating over time. It implies that the symptoms or severity of the condition are increasing.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient’s cancer is in a progressive stage.”
  • A person discussing their health might say, “I’ve been experiencing progressive weakness in my legs.”
  • In a medical report, it might be noted, “The patient’s condition is showing progressive decline.”

72. Stable

Refers to a condition or disease that is not getting worse or improving. It indicates that the symptoms or severity of the condition are remaining constant.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “The patient’s vital signs are stable.”
  • A person discussing their health might say, “I’ve been on medication for years, and my condition has remained stable.”
  • In a medical report, it might be noted, “The patient’s condition is currently stable.”

73. Remission

Used to describe a period of time when the signs and symptoms of a condition or disease are reduced or no longer present. It implies that the condition is under control or in a state of temporary improvement.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient’s cancer is in remission.”
  • A person discussing their health might say, “I’ve been in remission from my autoimmune disease for six months.”
  • In a medical report, it might be noted, “The patient’s condition has entered a state of remission.”
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