Top 41 Slang For Cross Check – Meaning & Usage

Cross check, a term often used in sports and everyday conversations, holds a certain level of intensity and impact. Whether you’re a sports enthusiast or just looking to expand your vocabulary, exploring the slang for cross check will definitely add a new dimension to your language arsenal. Join us as we break down the top slang terms related to cross checking and get ready to level up your linguistic game!

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1. CC

In the context of cross-checking, “CC” stands for carbon copy. It refers to the act of sending a copy of an email or document to someone else for their information or reference.

  • For example, “Please CC me on that email so I can cross-check the details.”
  • In a team project, a colleague might say, “CC me on the spreadsheet so I can double-check the calculations.”
  • A supervisor might request, “Make sure to CC me on any important correspondence so I can stay informed.”

2. Double-check

To double-check means to verify or confirm something again in order to ensure its accuracy or correctness.

  • For instance, “I need to double-check my work before submitting it.”
  • In a conversation about proofreading, someone might say, “Always double-check for spelling and grammar errors.”
  • A teacher might remind students, “Double-check your answers before handing in your test.”

3. Verify

To verify means to confirm the truth, accuracy, or validity of something by conducting a thorough examination or investigation.

  • For example, “I need to verify the sources before including this information in my report.”
  • In a discussion about online security, someone might advise, “Always verify the authenticity of websites before entering personal information.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to verify the alibi of the suspect to determine their involvement in the crime.”

4. Confirm

To confirm means to make sure or establish something as true, accurate, or valid.

  • For instance, “Please confirm your attendance for the meeting.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might ask, “Can you confirm the departure time of the flight?”
  • A customer service representative might say, “Let me confirm the availability of the product in our inventory.”

5. Validate

To validate means to check or confirm the authenticity, legitimacy, or accuracy of something.

  • For example, “The bank will validate your identity before issuing a new credit card.”
  • In a discussion about data analysis, someone might explain, “We need to validate the results by running multiple tests.”
  • A software developer might say, “The system will validate user inputs to prevent errors or malicious activities.”

6. Authenticate

This term refers to the process of confirming or validating the authenticity or accuracy of something. It is often used to ensure that information, documents, or identities are genuine or reliable.

  • For example, a user might say, “Can you authenticate this photo to prove it’s not edited?”
  • In a discussion about online security, someone might ask, “How can we authenticate the identity of users on this platform?”
  • A journalist might state, “I need to authenticate the sources before publishing the story.”

7. Fact-check

This phrase means to verify or confirm the accuracy of information, particularly in news articles, claims, or statements. Fact-checking involves researching and cross-referencing sources to ensure that the information presented is truthful.

  • For instance, a user might comment, “I fact-checked this article and found several inaccuracies.”
  • In a debate, someone might challenge a statement by saying, “I’ll fact-check that claim and get back to you.”
  • A journalist might write, “Before publishing, we always fact-check our sources to maintain credibility.”

8. Ensure

This word means to make certain or guarantee that something will happen or be the case. It is often used to emphasize the importance of taking necessary steps to prevent mistakes or ensure a desired outcome.

  • For example, a user might say, “Please ensure that all the documents are properly signed before submitting them.”
  • In a discussion about safety protocols, someone might remind others, “Ensure that you follow the proper procedures to prevent accidents.”
  • A supervisor might instruct their team, “Ensure that all the equipment is properly maintained to avoid any breakdowns.”

9. Assure

This term means to give someone confidence or peace of mind by guaranteeing or promising something. It is often used to provide reassurance or make someone feel more secure about a particular situation.

  • For instance, a user might comment, “I can assure you that this product is of high quality.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might say, “I assure you that the hotel has excellent reviews.”
  • A customer service representative might state, “I assure you that we will resolve your issue as soon as possible.”

10. Double-verify

This phrase means to verify or check something twice to ensure its accuracy or correctness. It emphasizes the importance of conducting a second verification to minimize errors or mistakes.

  • For example, a user might advise others, “Always double-verify your calculations before submitting the report.”
  • In a discussion about data entry, someone might say, “It’s crucial to double-verify the information to avoid any inaccuracies.”
  • A supervisor might instruct their team, “Double-verify all the details before finalizing the client’s order.”

11. Triple-check

To triple-check means to carefully examine or verify something three times to ensure its accuracy or correctness. It implies an extra level of caution and attention to detail.

  • For example, “Before submitting the report, make sure to triple-check all the numbers for accuracy.”
  • A teacher might remind students, “Triple-check your answers before handing in your test.”
  • In a conversation about proofreading, someone might say, “I always triple-check my work to catch any mistakes.”

12. Cross-reference

Cross-referencing involves comparing information from multiple sources or references to verify its accuracy or consistency. It is a method of double-checking by using different sources to confirm information.

  • For instance, “When writing a research paper, it’s important to cross-reference your sources to ensure credibility.”
  • A librarian might advise, “When fact-checking, cross-reference information from reputable sources.”
  • In a discussion about data analysis, someone might say, “Cross-referencing different datasets can help identify patterns and inconsistencies.”

13. Investigate

To investigate means to explore or examine a subject or situation in order to uncover facts, gather information, or solve a problem. It can involve conducting research, gathering evidence, or analyzing data.

  • For example, “The detective was assigned to investigate the crime scene.”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to investigate this story further before publishing.”
  • In a conversation about suspicious activity, someone might suggest, “We should investigate to find out what’s going on.”

14. Scrutinize

Scrutinizing involves carefully examining or inspecting something in detail. It implies a thorough and critical evaluation, often with the intention of finding flaws or inconsistencies.

  • For instance, “The auditor scrutinized the company’s financial records to ensure accuracy.”
  • A teacher might tell students, “Make sure to scrutinize your work for any errors before submitting it.”
  • In a discussion about product reviews, someone might say, “I always scrutinize customer feedback before making a purchase.”

15. Reassure

To reassure means to give someone confidence, comfort, or relief by addressing their doubts, fears, or concerns. It involves providing support or evidence to alleviate uncertainty or anxiety.

  • For example, “The doctor reassured the patient that the test results were normal.”
  • A parent might say, “Don’t worry, everything will be fine. I’m here to reassure you.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging task, someone might offer reassurance, saying, “You’ve got this! I have full confidence in your abilities.”

16. Check up on

To verify or confirm something by conducting a thorough investigation or examination. “Check up on” is a slang term used to describe the act of cross-checking information or facts.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I need to check up on the sources before publishing the article.”
  • A detective investigating a case might say, “I’ll check up on the suspect’s alibi to see if it holds up.”
  • A researcher might state, “I always check up on the data to ensure its accuracy before drawing conclusions.”

17. Prove

To validate or confirm the truth or accuracy of something. “Prove” is a slang term used to describe the act of cross-checking information or evidence to establish its validity.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to prove the facts before including them in my research paper.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “The evidence presented in court proves the defendant’s innocence.”
  • A scientist might state, “The results of the experiment prove the hypothesis to be true.”

18. Substantiate

To provide evidence or support for the truth or validity of something. “Substantiate” is a slang term used to describe the act of cross-checking information or claims to ensure their credibility.

  • For example, a historian might say, “I need to substantiate this theory with additional research.”
  • A fact-checker might state, “We need to substantiate the claims made in this article before publishing.”
  • A journalist might ask, “Can you substantiate your statement with any evidence?”

19. Double-ensure

To check something again or verify it a second time to ensure accuracy or correctness. “Double-ensure” is a slang term used to emphasize the importance of cross-checking information or details.

  • For instance, a pilot might say, “I always double-ensure the flight plan before takeoff.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Can you double-ensure that the total amount is correct before paying?”
  • A teacher might remind students, “Remember to double-ensure your answers before submitting the test.”

20. Triple-ensure

To check something three times or verify it multiple times to ensure absolute certainty or accuracy. “Triple-ensure” is a slang term used to emphasize the thoroughness of cross-checking information or facts.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “We need to triple-ensure the accuracy of the data before presenting it to the client.”
  • A proofreader might state, “I always triple-ensure the spelling and grammar of important documents.”
  • A quality control inspector might remind workers, “Make sure to triple-ensure the measurements before assembling the product.”

21. Double check

To verify or confirm something by checking it again for accuracy or completeness.

  • For example, “Before submitting the report, I always double check my calculations.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, one might say, “I’ll double check the flight details and get back to you.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “Make sure to double check your answers before turning in your homework.”

22. Inspect

To closely examine or scrutinize something for any flaws or errors.

  • For instance, “The mechanic will inspect the car to determine the cause of the problem.”
  • During a home inspection, a professional might say, “I will inspect the foundation and check for any signs of damage.”
  • A quality control inspector might state, “I inspect each product to ensure it meets the company’s standards.”

23. Review

To assess or examine something in order to form an opinion or provide feedback.

  • For example, “I need to review the document before it can be finalized.”
  • In a discussion about a new movie, someone might say, “I can’t wait to read the reviews before deciding whether to watch it.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Take some time to review the material before the exam.”

24. Monitor

To observe or keep a close watch on something to ensure its progress or performance.

  • For instance, “The security guard monitors the surveillance cameras to detect any suspicious activity.”
  • In a conversation about health, someone might say, “I need to monitor my blood pressure regularly.”
  • A project manager might state, “We need to monitor the team’s progress to ensure we meet the deadline.”

25. Fact check

To verify the accuracy of information or claims by conducting research or investigation.

  • For example, “Before sharing news articles, it’s important to fact check them to avoid spreading misinformation.”
  • During a debate, someone might say, “I fact checked your statement and found it to be false.”
  • A journalist might mention, “We have a team dedicated to fact checking all the information presented in our articles.”

26. Cross reference

This term refers to the act of verifying or confirming information by comparing it with another source or piece of information.

  • For example, a researcher might say, “I need to cross reference this data with the previous study.”
  • In a conversation about fact-checking, one might ask, “Did you cross reference that statistic before using it in your article?”
  • A librarian might advise, “Always cross reference information from multiple reliable sources to ensure accuracy.”

27. Confirmatory check

A confirmatory check is a step taken to ensure the accuracy or validity of information or data. It involves conducting a thorough examination or investigation to confirm the truth or reliability of something.

  • For instance, a quality control inspector might perform a confirmatory check on a product to ensure it meets the required standards.
  • In a scientific experiment, researchers might conduct a confirmatory check to validate their findings before publishing.
  • A journalist might say, “I always do a confirmatory check on facts before including them in my articles.”

28. Verify information

This term refers to the process of verifying or confirming the accuracy and reliability of information or data.

  • For example, a journalist might fact-check a news story before publishing it to ensure its credibility.
  • In a conversation about research, one might ask, “Have you verified the information from multiple sources?”
  • A teacher might advise students, “Always verify the information you find online before using it in your assignments.”

29. Validate data

Validating data involves checking and confirming the accuracy, completeness, and reliability of data.

  • For instance, a data analyst might validate the data before using it for analysis or reporting.
  • In a discussion about data integrity, one might say, “Validating data is a crucial step in maintaining data quality.”
  • A software developer might explain, “We have built-in validation checks to ensure the data entered by users is accurate and valid.”

30. Authenticate details

To authenticate details means to verify or confirm the legitimacy, accuracy, or truthfulness of specific information or details.

  • For example, a security officer might authenticate someone’s identification before granting them access to a restricted area.
  • In a discussion about online transactions, one might say, “Always authenticate the details of the website before entering your credit card information.”
  • A detective might authenticate the details of a witness’s statement to determine its reliability in a criminal investigation.
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31. Authenticate sources

– For example, a journalist might say, “Before publishing the article, I need to authenticate my sources.”

  • In a research project, a student might state, “I spent hours authenticating the sources for my bibliography.”
  • A fact-checker might explain, “Our team’s job is to authenticate the claims made by politicians and public figures.”

32. Double confirm

– For instance, a manager might say, “Before making a decision, I always double confirm the data.”

  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you double confirm the time of the meeting?”
  • A detective might say, “To solve the case, I need to double confirm the alibis of the suspects.”

33. Fact validate

– For example, a researcher might state, “It is crucial to fact validate any statistics before presenting them.”

  • In a debate, someone might argue, “Before accepting a statement as true, we need to fact validate it.”
  • A journalist might explain, “Fact validation is an essential part of our fact-checking process.”

34. Cross check data

– For instance, a data analyst might say, “I cross check the data from various databases to ensure reliability.”

  • In a scientific study, researchers might cross check their findings with previous studies.
  • A financial analyst might explain, “Cross checking financial data helps identify any discrepancies or errors.”

35. Verify sources

– For example, a student might state, “Before citing a source in my paper, I always verify its credibility.”

  • In a newsroom, a journalist might say, “We have a team dedicated to verifying sources before publishing a story.”
  • A researcher might explain, “Verifying sources is crucial to ensure the validity of the research findings.”

36. Validate facts

To validate facts means to verify or confirm the accuracy of information or statements. It involves conducting research or gathering evidence to support or refute a claim.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I need to validate these facts before publishing the article.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you validate the source of that information?”
  • A researcher might state, “We conducted multiple experiments to validate our findings.”

37. Authenticate information

To authenticate information means to verify the credibility or authenticity of the information. It involves confirming that the information is genuine and reliable.

  • For instance, a cybersecurity analyst might authenticate the source of a suspicious email.
  • In a legal context, someone might authenticate a document by verifying its origin and integrity.
  • A historian might authenticate a historical artifact by conducting thorough research and analysis.
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38. X-Check

X-Check is a shortened form of “cross-check” or “double-check.” It means to verify or confirm something by comparing it with other sources or information.

  • For example, a fact-checker might say, “I need to X-Check this claim with multiple reliable sources.”
  • In a team project, someone might suggest, “Let’s X-Check our findings to ensure accuracy.”
  • A researcher might state, “Cross-checking data is crucial for maintaining the integrity of the study.”

39. Check again

To check again means to verify or confirm something once more. It involves reviewing or examining the information or details to ensure accuracy.

  • For instance, a proofreader might say, “I need to check this document again for any errors.”
  • In a quality control process, someone might request, “Please check these measurements again to ensure accuracy.”
  • A teacher might instruct a student, “Before submitting your assignment, make sure to check it again for any mistakes.”

40. Examine

To examine means to inspect or scrutinize something closely. It involves carefully observing or analyzing the details or elements of a subject.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I need to examine the patient to make a diagnosis.”
  • In a forensic investigation, someone might examine evidence to gather information.
  • A researcher might state, “We need to examine the data to identify any patterns or trends.”

41. Compare

This term is used to emphasize the act of thoroughly checking or verifying something. It often implies a need for careful examination or scrutiny.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Make sure to compare your answers before submitting your test.”
  • In a business context, a manager might advise, “Before finalizing the report, compare the data from different sources to ensure accuracy.”
  • A friend might remind you, “Don’t forget to compare prices before making a purchase online.”