Top 54 Slang For Poisonous – Meaning & Usage

“Slang For Poisonous” may sound like a topic reserved for experts, but fear not, we’ve got you covered! From slang terms that pack a punch to those that leave you feeling a bit queasy, our team has rounded up the most intriguing and relevant phrases in the world of toxicity. Get ready to dive into this list and expand your vocabulary with some truly poisonous slang!

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1. Toxic

This term is used to describe something that is poisonous or harmful, especially in a figurative sense. It can refer to a person, situation, or behavior that is detrimental or negative.

  • For example, “That toxic relationship is bringing me down.”
  • In online gaming, a player might say, “Don’t engage with toxic players, they’ll just ruin your experience.”
  • A person discussing workplace dynamics might say, “Toxic coworkers can create a toxic work environment.”

2. Venomous

This word specifically refers to animals or organisms that produce and inject venom as a means of defense or hunting. It is often used to describe snakes, spiders, and other creatures with venomous bites or stings.

  • For instance, “Be careful, that snake is venomous!”
  • A person discussing wildlife might say, “The venomous spiders in this region are highly dangerous.”
  • In a discussion about poisonous animals, one might note, “Venomous animals have evolved unique ways to deliver their toxins.”

3. Deadly

This term describes something that has the potential to cause death or is extremely dangerous. It can refer to substances, situations, or even actions that have life-threatening consequences.

  • For example, “The venom of this snake is deadly.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous activities, one might say, “Playing with fire can have deadly consequences.”
  • A person discussing the risks of a particular drug might say, “Misusing this medication can be lethal.”

4. Lethal

Similar to “deadly,” this word means something that has the potential to cause death or is extremely dangerous. It is often used to describe weapons, substances, or actions that can result in fatal consequences.

  • For instance, “This weapon is designed to be lethal at close range.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous chemicals, one might say, “Exposure to this substance can be lethal.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of reckless driving might say, “Speeding can turn a car into a lethal weapon.”

5. Hazardous

This term describes something that is potentially dangerous or poses a risk to health or safety. It can refer to substances, conditions, or activities that have the potential to cause harm.

  • For example, “Working with chemicals without proper protective gear is hazardous.”
  • In a discussion about workplace safety, one might say, “This area is marked as hazardous due to the presence of toxic fumes.”
  • A person discussing outdoor activities might warn, “Hiking in extreme weather conditions can be hazardous to your health.”

6. Noxious

This term is used to describe something that is harmful, dangerous, or poisonous. It can refer to substances, gases, or even ideas or behaviors that have a negative impact.

  • For example, “The fumes from the factory were noxious and caused health problems for the nearby residents.”
  • A person might say, “That person’s attitude is noxious. It’s toxic to be around them.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, someone might argue, “We need to reduce our reliance on noxious chemicals to protect the planet.”

7. Virulent

This term is often used to describe something that is extremely harmful or poisonous. It can refer to diseases, toxins, or even people with malicious intent.

  • For instance, “The virus was highly virulent and spread rapidly throughout the population.”
  • A person might say, “His words were virulent, causing emotional harm to those who heard them.”
  • In a discussion about online harassment, someone might comment, “Trolls often spew virulent comments, seeking to hurt others.”

8. Corrosive

This term is used to describe something that has the ability to eat away or destroy other substances. It can be used metaphorically to describe ideas or behaviors that have a negative impact.

  • For example, “The acid was highly corrosive and ate through the metal.”
  • A person might say, “His toxic behavior was corrosive to the team’s morale.”
  • In a discussion about negative relationships, someone might comment, “Emotional abuse can be just as corrosive as physical abuse.”

9. Malevolent

This term is used to describe someone or something that has a strong desire to harm others. It often implies a deliberate intent to cause pain or suffering.

  • For instance, “The serial killer had a malevolent nature, taking pleasure in the suffering of others.”
  • A person might say, “Her malevolent gossip caused harm to the reputation of many.”
  • In a discussion about cyberbullying, someone might comment, “Trolls often hide behind anonymous profiles, spreading malevolent messages.”

10. Malignant

This term is often used to describe something that is dangerous or harmful. It is commonly associated with medical terminology, referring to cancerous cells that can spread and cause damage.

  • For example, “The tumor was malignant and required immediate treatment.”
  • A person might say, “His intentions were malignant, seeking to harm others for personal gain.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, someone might comment, “Her behavior was malignant, causing emotional harm to her partner.”

11. Baneful

This term is used to describe something that is destructive or harmful, especially in a figurative sense. It implies that the object or situation is capable of causing great harm or bringing about negative consequences.

  • For example, “The baneful effects of pollution on the environment are becoming increasingly evident.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of a certain substance might say, “Exposure to this chemical can have baneful effects on your health.”
  • In a political context, someone might argue, “The baneful influence of money in politics is corrupting our democracy.”

12. Pestilent

This word is used to describe something that is infected or contaminated with disease. It implies that the object or situation is capable of spreading disease or causing harm to living organisms.

  • For instance, “The pestilent water in the stagnant pond was a breeding ground for mosquitoes.”
  • In a discussion about a widespread illness, one might say, “The pestilent outbreak has affected thousands of people.”
  • A person describing a dirty and unsanitary environment might say, “The pestilent conditions in the slums are a breeding ground for disease.”

13. Vicious

This term is used to describe something that is extremely cruel, violent, or aggressive. It implies that the object or situation is capable of causing harm or injury, often in a brutal or ruthless manner.

  • For example, “The vicious attack left the victim with severe injuries.”
  • In a discussion about a dangerous animal, one might say, “The tiger is known for its vicious hunting tactics.”
  • A person describing a hostile and aggressive person might say, “He has a vicious temper and is prone to violent outbursts.”

14. Mephitic

This word is used to describe something that is foul-smelling or emitting a strong and unpleasant odor. It implies that the object or situation is capable of causing harm or discomfort due to its noxious fumes or gases.

  • For instance, “The mephitic odor coming from the sewer was unbearable.”
  • In a discussion about air pollution, one might say, “The mephitic emissions from factories are contributing to the decline in air quality.”
  • A person describing a toxic chemical might say, “The mephitic properties of this substance make it dangerous to handle without proper protection.”

15. Cursed

This term is used to describe something that is believed to be under a supernatural curse or spell. It implies that the object or situation is plagued with misfortune or bad luck, often attributed to some form of supernatural intervention.

  • For example, “The cursed artifact brought nothing but tragedy to those who possessed it.”
  • In a discussion about a haunted location, one might say, “The cursed house is said to be haunted by vengeful spirits.”
  • A person describing a series of unfortunate events might say, “It seems like I’m cursed with bad luck.”

16. Blighted

This term refers to something that is affected by a disease or condition that causes harm or destruction. In the context of poisonous substances, it implies that the substance is harmful or destructive.

  • For example, “The blighted water in the river caused several fish to die.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, one might say, “The blighted soil in that area is not safe for farming.”
  • A person warning others about a toxic plant might say, “Stay away from the blighted berries on that bush.”

17. Toxicant

This term refers to a substance that is capable of causing harm or death when ingested, inhaled, or absorbed by the body. It is often used in scientific or technical contexts to describe a specific toxic substance.

  • For instance, “The toxicant found in that pesticide can be harmful to humans.”
  • In a conversation about chemical safety, one might say, “Always wear protective gear when handling toxicants.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of pollution might mention, “Toxicants released into the air can have devastating effects on the environment.”

18. Envenomed

This term describes something that has been deliberately or accidentally contaminated with venom or poison. It suggests that the substance has the potential to cause harm or death if consumed or encountered.

  • For example, “The envenomed arrow caused a severe reaction in the victim.”
  • In a discussion about snake bites, one might say, “The envenomed bite of a venomous snake can be lethal.”
  • A person warning others about a poisonous spider might say, “Be careful not to get envenomed by that dangerous creature.”

19. Harmful

This term describes something that has the potential to cause harm, injury, or damage. In the context of poisonous substances, it implies that the substance poses a risk to health or well-being.

  • For instance, “The harmful chemicals in that cleaning product can irritate the skin.”
  • In a conversation about food safety, one might say, “Consuming expired food can be harmful to your health.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of smoking might mention, “Cigarette smoke contains harmful toxins that can lead to serious health issues.”

20. Deadly nightshade

This term refers to a highly toxic plant, scientifically known as Atropa belladonna, that produces berries that are extremely poisonous. The plant is characterized by its dark, shiny berries and bell-shaped flowers. It is often used as a metaphor for something dangerous or lethal.

  • For example, “The deadly nightshade is one of the most poisonous plants in existence.”
  • In a discussion about folklore, one might say, “In some legends, witches used deadly nightshade to create potions.”
  • A person warning others about a toxic plant might say, “Be careful not to confuse deadly nightshade with edible berries.”

21. Belladonna

Belladonna is a highly toxic plant that is also known as deadly nightshade. It contains poisonous alkaloids and has been historically used as a poison and in medicine.

  • For example, someone might say, “Be careful, that plant is as deadly as belladonna.”
  • In a discussion about toxic plants, one might mention, “Belladonna is one of the most dangerous plants due to its high toxicity.”
  • A person studying herbal medicine might note, “Belladonna has been used in small doses for its medicinal properties, but it must be handled with extreme caution due to its toxicity.”

22. Hemlock

Hemlock is a highly poisonous plant that belongs to the carrot family. It contains a toxic alkaloid called coniine and has been historically used as a method of execution.

  • For instance, in ancient Greece, Socrates was famously executed by drinking a cup of hemlock.
  • In a conversation about poisonous plants, one might say, “Hemlock is one of the deadliest plants out there.”
  • A person researching toxic plants might mention, “The ingestion of hemlock can cause paralysis and ultimately lead to death.”

23. Nightshade

Nightshade refers to a group of plants that contain toxic alkaloids. Some common examples include belladonna, deadly nightshade, and bittersweet nightshade.

  • For example, someone might say, “Nightshade plants should be avoided as they can be highly poisonous.”
  • In a discussion about gardening, one might mention, “Certain nightshade plants can be harmful if ingested.”
  • A person studying plant toxicity might note, “Nightshade plants contain alkaloids that can cause a range of symptoms, from mild discomfort to severe poisoning.”

24. Cyanide

Cyanide is a highly toxic chemical compound that can be found in various forms. It is known for its rapid and lethal effects on the body, interfering with the body’s ability to use oxygen.

  • For instance, in crime stories, someone might say, “The victim was killed with a dose of cyanide.”
  • In a conversation about dangerous substances, one might mention, “Cyanide is one of the deadliest poisons known to man.”
  • A person discussing historical cases of poisoning might note, “Cyanide has been used as a method of murder throughout history.”

25. Arsenic

Arsenic is a naturally occurring element that is highly toxic to humans. It has been used as a poison for centuries and can be found in various forms.

  • For example, in murder mysteries, someone might say, “The culprit used arsenic to poison their victim.”
  • In a discussion about environmental toxins, one might mention, “Arsenic contamination in drinking water can have severe health consequences.”
  • A person studying toxicology might note, “Arsenic poisoning can cause a range of symptoms, from abdominal pain to organ failure.”

26. Mercury

Mercury is a chemical element that is liquid at room temperature. In slang, it is sometimes referred to as “quicksilver.” This term is often used to describe something that is unpredictable or difficult to control.

  • For example, “Her emotions are like quicksilver, you never know how she’ll react.”
  • In a discussion about a fast and agile athlete, someone might say, “He moves on the field like quicksilver.”
  • Another usage could be, “The stock market can be as volatile as quicksilver, with prices changing rapidly.”

27. Lead

Lead is a toxic heavy metal that was once commonly used in various products. In slang, it is sometimes referred to by its chemical symbol, “Pb.” This term is often used to describe something dangerous or harmful.

  • For instance, “He’s a bad influence, stay away from him, he’s full of Pb.”
  • In a conversation about contaminated water, someone might say, “The tap water in that area has high levels of Pb.”
  • Another usage could be, “Be careful when handling old paint, it may contain Pb.”

28. Dioxin

Dioxin is a highly toxic and persistent environmental pollutant. In slang, it is sometimes referred to as “Agent Orange.” This term is often used to describe something harmful or destructive.

  • For example, “That toxic relationship is like Agent Orange, it’s slowly destroying him.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, someone might say, “The factory’s waste is releasing dioxin into the river.”
  • Another usage could be, “Be aware of the potential dioxin exposure when working with certain chemicals.”

29. Botulinum

Botulinum is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. In slang, it is sometimes referred to as “Botox.” This term is often used to describe something that is toxic or harmful.

  • For instance, “Be careful with that food, it might be contaminated with Botox.”
  • In a conversation about cosmetic procedures, someone might say, “She’s considering getting Botox injections.”
  • Another usage could be, “The botulinum toxin can cause severe illness if ingested.”

30. Strychnine

Strychnine is a highly toxic substance commonly used as a pesticide and rat poison. In slang, it is sometimes referred to as “rat poison.” This term is often used to describe something dangerous or harmful.

  • For example, “Stay away from that guy, he’s like rat poison, toxic to your well-being.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of certain substances, someone might say, “Strychnine is highly lethal and should never be ingested.”
  • Another usage could be, “The detective found traces of rat poison in the victim’s system.”

31. Ricin

Ricin is a highly potent toxin that is extracted from the seeds of the castor bean plant. It can be used as a deadly poison and has been used in assassination attempts.

  • For example, “The terrorist group attempted to use ricin as a weapon of mass destruction.”
  • A news headline might read, “Man arrested for possessing ricin and planning an attack.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous substances, someone might say, “Ricin is one of the most lethal toxins known to man.”

32. Aconite

Aconite, also known as “wolf’s bane,” is a highly poisonous plant. It contains aconitine, a cardiotoxic alkaloid that can cause cardiac arrest and death.

  • For instance, “The villain in the movie used aconite to poison his enemies.”
  • In a conversation about dangerous plants, someone might mention, “Aconite is one of the deadliest plants in the world.”
  • A person studying botany might say, “Aconite has been used in traditional medicine, but its toxicity makes it extremely dangerous.”

33. Foxglove

Foxglove is a flowering plant known for its bell-shaped flowers. However, it contains cardiac glycosides, which can be toxic if ingested. It has been used in traditional medicine but can be deadly if not used properly.

  • For example, “The foxglove plant is poisonous to humans and animals.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous flowers, someone might say, “Foxglove is a beautiful but deadly plant.”
  • A person interested in gardening might note, “Foxglove is a popular ornamental plant, but it’s important to handle it with caution.”

34. Oleander

Oleander is a popular ornamental plant known for its attractive flowers. However, all parts of the plant, including the leaves and flowers, contain toxic compounds called cardiac glycosides.

  • For instance, “Ingesting oleander can be fatal to humans and animals.”
  • In a conversation about dangerous plants, someone might mention, “Oleander is one of the most poisonous plants commonly found in gardens.”
  • A person discussing landscaping might say, “Oleander can add beauty to a garden, but it’s important to be aware of its toxic properties.”

35. Yew

Yew is a type of tree that is commonly found in gardens and parks. However, the seeds and leaves of the yew tree contain a toxic compound called taxine, which can be deadly if ingested.

  • For example, “The yew tree is highly poisonous to humans and animals.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous trees, someone might say, “Yew trees are beautiful but can be deadly.”
  • A person interested in horticulture might note, “Yew trees are often used in landscaping, but it’s important to handle them with caution.”

36. Monkshood

Monkshood, also known as wolfsbane, is a highly poisonous plant that belongs to the buttercup family. The name “monkshood” comes from the shape of the flowers, which resemble a monk’s hood or cowl. It is known for its toxic properties and has been used historically as a poison and in traditional medicine.

  • For example, “Be careful not to touch monkshood plants as they can be deadly.”
  • A hiker might warn others by saying, “Stay away from the monkshood growing near the trail.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous plants, someone might mention, “Monkshood is one of the most toxic plants found in the wild.”

37. Death cap

The death cap is a highly toxic mushroom that is responsible for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It belongs to the Amanita genus and is known for its distinctive appearance and deadly effects. The name “death cap” accurately describes the mushroom’s danger to humans and animals.

  • For instance, “Eating a death cap mushroom can lead to severe organ failure.”
  • A mycologist might explain, “The toxins in the death cap destroy liver cells.”
  • In a conversation about foraging for wild mushrooms, someone might mention, “Always be cautious and learn to identify the death cap to avoid poisoning.”

38. Destroying angel

The destroying angel is another highly toxic mushroom belonging to the Amanita genus. It is closely related to the death cap and shares similar deadly properties. The name “destroying angel” reflects the mushroom’s ability to cause severe illness or death upon ingestion.

  • For example, “The destroying angel is one of the most poisonous mushrooms in North America.”
  • A mushroom enthusiast might warn others by saying, “Beware of the white, gilled mushrooms in the forest, as they could be destroying angels.”
  • In a discussion about mushroom poisoning, someone might mention, “The symptoms of ingesting a destroying angel include vomiting, diarrhea, and liver damage.”

39. Fly agaric

The fly agaric is a highly recognizable and toxic mushroom known for its distinctive red cap with white spots. It belongs to the Amanita genus and has a long history of use in traditional rituals and folklore. The name “fly agaric” comes from its historical use as a fly repellent.

  • For instance, “The fly agaric contains psychoactive compounds and should not be consumed.”
  • A mushroom hunter might say, “I found a beautiful fly agaric in the woods, but I left it untouched due to its toxicity.”
  • In a conversation about hallucinogenic mushrooms, someone might mention, “The fly agaric is often associated with myths and fairy tales due to its striking appearance.”

40. Jack-o’-lantern

The jack-o’-lantern mushroom is a poisonous species that is often mistaken for the edible chanterelle mushroom. It is characterized by its bright orange color and gilled underside. The name “jack-o’-lantern” refers to the mushroom’s bioluminescent properties, as it can emit a faint glow in the dark.

  • For example, “The jack-o’-lantern mushroom should never be consumed, as it can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms.”
  • A mycologist might caution, “Be careful when foraging for mushrooms, as the jack-o’-lantern can be easily mistaken for the edible chanterelle.”
  • In a discussion about toxic mushrooms, someone might mention, “The jack-o’-lantern is one of the most common poisonous mushrooms found in North America.”

41. False morel

The term “false morel” refers to a type of mushroom that resembles the true morel but is actually poisonous. The false morel contains a toxic compound called gyromitrin, which can cause severe illness if ingested.

  • For example, a mushroom enthusiast might warn, “Be careful not to confuse the false morel with the edible morel. The false morel can be deadly.”
  • In a discussion about foraging for mushrooms, someone might ask, “Has anyone ever come across a false morel in the wild?”
  • A chef might advise, “Never use false morels in cooking. They can be extremely toxic if not prepared correctly.”

42. Angel of death

The term “angel of death” is slang for someone who intentionally causes harm or death through the use of poison. It is often used to describe a serial killer or someone with a fascination for toxic substances.

  • For instance, a true crime enthusiast might say, “The angel of death was known for poisoning their victims with various substances.”
  • In a discussion about famous poisoners throughout history, someone might mention, “The angel of death was one of the most notorious.”
  • A writer might use the term in a fictional story, describing a character as “the angel of death, lurking in the shadows with their deadly concoctions.”

43. Malefic

The term “malefic” is an adjective used to describe something that is harmful, evil, or has a negative influence. It can be used to refer to toxic substances or individuals with malicious intent.

  • For example, someone might say, “The malefic effects of the poison were evident in the victim’s deteriorating health.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous chemicals, a scientist might warn, “This compound has malefic properties and should be handled with extreme caution.”
  • A writer might describe a villain as “a malefic character who uses poison to achieve their sinister goals.”
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44. Cytotoxic

The term “cytotoxic” refers to substances or agents that are toxic to cells. It is often used in the context of chemotherapy drugs that target and destroy cancer cells.

  • For instance, a doctor might explain, “This medication is cytotoxic, meaning it kills cancer cells but can also harm healthy cells.”
  • In a discussion about the side effects of chemotherapy, a patient might say, “I experienced cytotoxic effects like hair loss and nausea.”
  • A researcher might discuss the development of new cytotoxic compounds for cancer treatment, stating, “Our goal is to find more targeted and less toxic cytotoxic agents.”

45. Miasmic

The term “miasmic” is used to describe something that is foul-smelling and toxic. It can refer to noxious gases or substances that emit a strong, unpleasant odor.

  • For example, someone might say, “The miasmic fumes from the chemical spill were overwhelming.”
  • In a discussion about environmental hazards, a scientist might warn, “The miasmic air around the factory is a result of toxic emissions.”
  • A writer might describe a scene as “a miasmic swamp,“a miasmic swamp, with poisonous gases rising from its murky depths.”

46. Pestilential

This word refers to something or someone that is harmful or destructive, often in a contagious or widespread manner. It can also describe a foul or unpleasant smell.

  • For example, “The pestilential fumes from the factory caused respiratory problems in the nearby community.”
  • In a discussion about a toxic relationship, someone might say, “Her pestilential behavior drained all of my energy.”
  • A person describing a polluted river might comment, “The pestilential waters are a danger to both humans and wildlife.”

47. Nocuous

Nocuous is an adjective that describes something that is likely to cause harm or damage. It can refer to physical, emotional, or mental harm.

  • For instance, “Exposure to nocuous chemicals can have long-term health effects.”
  • In a conversation about unhealthy habits, someone might say, “Smoking is a nocuous habit that can lead to various diseases.”
  • A person discussing the negative impact of gossip might state, “Nocuous rumors can destroy relationships and reputations.”

48. Baleful

This word describes something or someone that is threatening, harmful, or ominous. It often suggests a sense of evil or malevolence.

  • For example, “The baleful glare from the wild animal made me freeze in fear.”
  • In a discussion about a dangerous situation, someone might say, “The storm clouds had a baleful appearance.”
  • A person describing a toxic work environment might comment, “The baleful atmosphere made it impossible to thrive.”

49. Sinister

Sinister is an adjective that describes something or someone that is threatening, evil, or wicked. It often implies a hidden or malicious intent.

  • For instance, “The villain had a sinister smile that sent chills down my spine.”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious event, someone might say, “There’s something sinister going on in this town.”
  • A person discussing a deceptive plan might state, “He had a sinister motive behind his actions.”

50. Maleficent

Maleficent is an adjective that describes something or someone that is harmful, malicious, or causing harm. It often suggests an intentional desire to cause suffering or evil.

  • For example, “The maleficent witch cast a spell on the kingdom.”
  • In a discussion about a harmful act, someone might say, “His maleficent actions had severe consequences.”
  • A person describing a toxic friendship might comment, “She had a maleficent influence on my life.”

51. Injurious

This word is used to describe something that causes harm or injury. It can be used to refer to substances, actions, or situations that have the potential to be dangerous.

  • For example, “Exposure to the toxic fumes from the factory can be injurious to your health.”
  • A warning label on a chemical might state, “Injurious if swallowed or inhaled.”
  • When discussing the effects of certain foods, someone might say, “Consuming large amounts of sugar can be injurious to your overall well-being.”

52. Poisonous

This term is used to describe something that contains or produces poison or toxins, which can cause harm or death if ingested, touched, or inhaled.

  • For instance, “The berries on that plant are poisonous and should not be eaten.”
  • A sign near a toxic chemical might read, “Danger! This substance is poisonous.”
  • When discussing the effects of certain medications, someone might say, “An overdose of this drug can be poisonous and lead to severe complications.”

53. Contaminated

This word is used to describe something that has been contaminated or polluted with harmful substances or impurities. It can refer to food, water, air, or any other substance that has been tainted.

  • For example, “The water in that area is contaminated with bacteria and should not be consumed.”
  • A warning label on a product might state, “Do not use if the packaging is damaged or if the product appears contaminated.”
  • When discussing the effects of pollution on the environment, someone might say, “Contaminated air can have a negative impact on our respiratory health.”

54. Perilous

This term is used to describe something that is full of danger or fraught with risk. It implies that there is a high likelihood of harm or injury.

  • For instance, “Venturing into the deep woods without a map or proper equipment can be perilous.”
  • A warning sign near a hazardous area might read, “Keep out! This area is perilous and can result in serious injury or death.”
  • When discussing extreme sports or activities, someone might say, “Skydiving is a perilous adventure that requires careful preparation and skill.”