Top 45 Slang For Direction – Meaning & Usage

Navigating the world of slang can sometimes feel like being lost without a map. But fear not, for we have your back! In this article, we’ve curated a list of the top slang for direction that will guide you through the maze of trendy language. So buckle up and get ready to steer your way through the latest lingo with confidence and style!

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1. Northbound

This term refers to traveling or moving in a direction towards the north. It is commonly used to describe transportation or travel routes.

  • For example, a transportation announcement might say, “The next train is northbound, departing in 5 minutes.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Is this bus going northbound?”
  • In a conversation about road trips, someone might say, “We’re planning to drive northbound along the coast.”

2. Southbound

This term refers to traveling or moving in a direction towards the south. It is commonly used to describe transportation or travel routes.

  • For instance, a highway sign might indicate, “Southbound traffic exit ahead.”
  • A commuter might say, “I take the southbound train to work every morning.”
  • In a discussion about vacation destinations, someone might suggest, “Let’s head southbound to the beach.”

3. Eastbound

This term refers to traveling or moving in a direction towards the east. It is commonly used to describe transportation or travel routes.

  • For example, a flight attendant might announce, “Passengers traveling to New York, please proceed to gate 12 for the eastbound flight.”
  • A driver might say, “I need to take the next exit for the eastbound highway.”
  • In a conversation about time zones, someone might mention, “When I flew eastbound, I had to adjust to a three-hour time difference.”

4. Westbound

This term refers to traveling or moving in a direction towards the west. It is commonly used to describe transportation or travel routes.

  • For instance, a road sign might indicate, “Westbound lane closed for construction.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Is this train going westbound?”
  • In a discussion about sunsets, someone might say, “We watched the beautiful colors as the sun set in the westbound sky.”

5. Up the road

This phrase is used to describe a location or destination that is located further ahead on the road.

  • For example, a local might give directions, “Keep driving up the road until you see a gas station on your right.”
  • A driver might say, “I saw a quaint little café up the road, we should stop there for lunch.”
  • In a conversation about a road trip, someone might mention, “We found a hidden gem up the road, a beautiful waterfall.”

6. Down the road

This phrase is often used to refer to something that will happen or be available in the future.

  • For example, “There are some exciting opportunities down the road for our company.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t have time for that right now, but maybe down the road.”
  • When discussing long-term plans, someone might mention, “We’ll address that issue down the road.”

7. Left at the fork

This phrase is used to give directions on which way to turn when there is a fork in the road.

  • For instance, “When you reach the intersection, go left at the fork.”
  • A person might say, “If you see a sign for the park, take a left at the fork.”
  • When giving someone directions, you could say, “Keep going straight until you reach a fork, then take the left.”

Similar to “Left at the fork,” this phrase is used to give directions on which way to turn when there is a fork in the road, but in this case, it instructs to take the right turn.

  • For example, “After the bridge, go right at the fork.”
  • A person might say, “When you see a gas station, make sure to take a right at the fork.”
  • When giving someone directions, you could say, “Keep going straight until you reach a fork, then take the right.”

9. Straight ahead

This phrase is used to indicate that someone should continue moving forward without making any turns.

  • For instance, “Keep going straight ahead until you reach the traffic light.”
  • A person might say, “If you see a big sign, just keep going straight ahead.”
  • When giving someone directions, you could say, “After you pass the park, continue straight ahead.”

10. Around the corner

This phrase is often used to indicate that something is nearby or just a short distance away.

  • For example, “The grocery store is just around the corner from my house.”
  • A person might say, “There’s a great coffee shop around the corner if you’re looking for a caffeine fix.”
  • When discussing upcoming events, someone might mention, “The concert venue is just around the corner from here.”

11. Over yonder

This phrase is used to indicate a location that is nearby, but not specifically defined. It is often used in a rural or Southern context.

  • For example, someone might say, “The store is just over yonder, past the big oak tree.”
  • In a conversation about finding a hiking trail, someone might point and say, “You’ll see the trailhead over yonder, by the creek.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Keep going down this road, and you’ll see the house over yonder on the left.”

12. Back the way you came

This phrase is used to instruct someone to go back in the direction they came from.

  • For instance, if someone is lost and asks for directions, the response might be, “Just go back the way you came.”
  • In a hiking situation, someone might say, “We missed the turnoff, so we need to go back the way we came.”
  • A person giving driving directions might say, “You passed the exit, so you’ll need to take the next one and then go back the way you came.”

13. Towards the city

This phrase is used to indicate movement or direction towards a city or urban area.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m heading towards the city to meet some friends for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about commuting, someone might mention, “I have to drive towards the city every morning for work.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Keep going straight on this road, and it will take you towards the city.”

14. Out in the boonies

This phrase is used to describe a location that is far away from populated areas and often lacks modern amenities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My grandparents live out in the boonies, surrounded by fields and woods.”
  • In a conversation about camping, someone might mention, “We found a great spot out in the boonies, away from all the noise.”
  • A person describing a road trip might say, “We took a detour and ended up in the boonies, but it was worth it for the beautiful scenery.”

15. Off the beaten path

This phrase is used to describe a location or route that is less traveled or less well-known.

  • For example, someone might say, “We found a charming little café off the beaten path.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might recommend, “If you want an authentic experience, venture off the beaten path and explore the local neighborhoods.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Instead of taking the main road, you can take this trail off the beaten path to avoid traffic.”

16. Across town

When someone says “I need to go across town to pick up my package,” it means they need to travel from one end of the town to the other.

  • A person might say, “Let’s drive across town to try that new restaurant.”
  • In a conversation about running errands, someone might mention, “I have to go across town to the post office.”

17. Through the woods

If someone says “I walked through the woods to get to the lake,” it means they went through a forest to reach their destination.

  • For example, “We hiked through the woods to reach the campsite.”
  • In a discussion about nature walks, someone might say, “I love taking a stroll through the woods to clear my mind.”
  • A person might mention, “I got lost when I took a shortcut through the woods.”

18. Along the coastline

When someone says “We drove along the coastline to see the sunset,” it means they followed the road or path that runs parallel to the coast.

  • For instance, “We took a road trip and drove along the coastline, stopping at different beaches.”
  • In a conversation about vacation destinations, someone might mention, “I love walking along the coastline and collecting seashells.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s take a scenic drive along the coastline and enjoy the ocean views.”

19. Across the bridge

If someone says “I walked across the bridge to get to the other side,” it means they traversed the bridge to reach their destination.

  • For example, “We drove across the bridge to visit the city.”
  • In a discussion about commuting, someone might mention, “I walk across the bridge every day to get to work.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s take a bike ride across the bridge and enjoy the view.”

20. Up the hill

When someone says “We hiked up the hill to reach the summit,” it means they climbed the hill to reach the top.

  • For instance, “I had to push my bike up the hill because it was too steep.”
  • In a conversation about outdoor activities, someone might mention, “I love running up the hill for a good workout.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s take a leisurely walk up the hill and enjoy the panoramic view.”

21. Off course

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something has deviated from the intended route or direction.

  • For example, “I missed my turn and now I’m completely off course.”
  • A driver might say, “I took the wrong exit and ended up off course.”
  • In a hiking trip, someone might realize, “We’ve been walking in the wrong direction for hours. We’re definitely off course.”

22. Follow the signs

This phrase means to pay attention to and follow the signs or indicators that provide guidance or directions.

  • For instance, “If you’re lost, just follow the signs to the nearest gas station.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Keep going straight and follow the signs for the airport.”
  • In a city, a pedestrian might ask, “Can you tell me how to get to the museum? Should I follow the signs?”

23. Take a detour

This phrase suggests taking a different path or route than originally planned, usually due to road closures, traffic, or other obstacles.

  • For example, “There’s construction ahead, so we’ll have to take a detour.”
  • A driver might say, “I always take a detour to avoid the heavy traffic on this road.”
  • In a navigation app, a user might see the message, “Take a detour to save 10 minutes.”

This phrase means to move or travel towards a specific destination or location.

  • For instance, “Head for the beach if you want to catch some sun.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Head for the main street and turn left at the second intersection.”
  • In a road trip, someone might suggest, “Let’s head for the mountains and enjoy the scenic views.”

25. Make a U-turn

This phrase refers to the action of turning a vehicle around by making a 180-degree turn in the shape of a “U”.

  • For example, “I missed the exit, so I had to make a U-turn to get back on track.”
  • A driver might say, “The road is blocked ahead, let’s make a U-turn and find another way.”
  • In a navigation app, the instructions might say, “In 500 feet, make a U-turn to reach your destination.”

26. Go the distance

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to persevere and complete a difficult task or journey.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “We need to go the distance and win this game!”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Don’t give up, keep going the distance to achieve your goals.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging project, someone might say, “We’re almost there, let’s go the distance and finish strong.”

27. Hit the road

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is starting a journey or leaving a location.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “It’s getting late, let’s hit the road and head home.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “It’s time to hit the road and find some adventure.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Just packed up the car, hitting the road for a weekend getaway!”

28. Get on track

This phrase is used to encourage someone to return to the right path or course of action after being distracted or making a mistake.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a student, “You’ve been slacking off, it’s time to get on track and start studying.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We’ve been focusing on the wrong priorities, let’s get on track and refocus on our goals.”
  • A friend might offer advice, “You’ve been partying too much, it’s time to get on track and take care of your responsibilities.”

29. Lose your way

This phrase is used to describe the act of becoming lost or confused, either literally or metaphorically.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I took a wrong turn and lost my way in the city.”
  • In a discussion about life’s challenges, someone might say, “Sometimes we lose our way, but it’s important to find our path again.”
  • A person might reflect on a difficult period in their life and say, “I lost my way for a while, but I eventually found my purpose.”

30. Find your bearings

This phrase is used to describe the act of getting your bearings or understanding your location and surroundings.

  • For example, a hiker might say, “I need a moment to find my bearings and figure out which way to go.”
  • In a new city, someone might ask for directions and say, “I’m trying to find my bearings, can you point me in the right direction?”
  • A person might reflect on a challenging situation and say, “Once I found my bearings, I was able to navigate through the difficulties.”

31. Eastward

This term refers to the direction of travel or movement towards the east.

  • For example, “We need to go eastward to reach the beach.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “Let’s head eastward and explore the coastal cities.”
  • A hiker might mention, “The trail leads eastward towards the summit.”

32. Westward

This term refers to the direction of travel or movement towards the west.

  • For instance, “We’re driving westward to catch the sunset.”
  • In a conversation about migration, someone might say, “The birds fly westward during the winter.”
  • A traveler might mention, “I’m planning a road trip westward to visit national parks.”

33. Up

This term is used to indicate movement in an upward direction.

  • For example, “We need to climb up the stairs to reach the rooftop.”
  • In a discussion about elevators, someone might say, “Press the button to go up to the 10th floor.”
  • A person giving directions might mention, “Walk up the hill and you’ll find the restaurant on your left.”

34. Down

This term is used to indicate movement in a downward direction.

  • For instance, “Carefully walk down the stairs to avoid tripping.”
  • In a conversation about skiing, someone might say, “I love going down the slopes at high speed.”
  • A person giving directions might mention, “Go down the street and you’ll see the store on your right.”

35. Left

This term is used to indicate movement or direction towards the left side.

  • For example, “Turn left at the intersection to reach the park.”
  • In a discussion about driving, someone might say, “Stay in the left lane to make a left turn.”
  • A person giving directions might mention, “Walk straight and take the second left.”

This term refers to the direction that is opposite of left. It can also be used to mean the correct or appropriate direction.

  • For example, if someone asks for directions, you might say, “Turn right at the next intersection.”
  • In a conversation about navigation, someone might say, “Always follow the signs and turn right when necessary.”
  • A person might also use this term to express agreement, saying, “You’re right, we should go that way.”

37. Straight

This term means to continue moving forward without turning to the left or right.

  • For instance, if someone asks for directions, you might say, “Go straight for two blocks.”
  • In a discussion about navigation, someone might say, “Just keep going straight until you reach the highway.”
  • A person might also use this term to indicate honesty or sincerity, saying, “I’m telling you the truth, straight up.”

38. Backwards

This term refers to the opposite direction of forward or the way something is typically done.

  • For example, if someone asks for directions, you might say, “Turn around and go backwards for a short distance.”
  • In a conversation about progress, someone might say, “We can’t move backwards, we need to keep moving forward.”
  • A person might also use this term to express disapproval or criticism, saying, “That’s a backwards way of thinking.”

39. Ahead

This term means to move or progress in the direction that is in front or in the future.

  • For instance, if someone asks for directions, you might say, “Continue straight ahead until you reach the intersection.”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might say, “We need to think ahead and consider all possible outcomes.”
  • A person might also use this term to indicate success or achievement, saying, “You’re doing great, keep pushing ahead.”

40. On point

This term means to be exactly on target or to be correct in a particular situation.

  • For example, if someone asks for directions, you might say, “You’re on point, just keep going straight.”
  • In a conversation about performance, someone might say, “Her presentation was on point, she covered all the important details.”
  • A person might also use this term to indicate someone who is fashionable or stylish, saying, “Her outfit is always on point.”

41. On the move

This phrase is used to describe someone who is actively traveling or constantly on the go.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’m always on the move, exploring new places.”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “On the move again, off to my next adventure!”
  • In a conversation about busy schedules, someone might say, “I can’t stay in one place for too long, I’m always on the move.”

42. Off the path

This phrase is used to describe someone who is taking a different route or choosing a different path than what is typically expected or followed.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I decided to go off the path and pursue a career in art instead of medicine.”
  • In a discussion about unconventional choices, someone might comment, “Sometimes it’s good to go off the path and explore new possibilities.”
  • A traveler might post a photo and caption it, “Exploring off the path, discovering hidden gems.”

43. On the road

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is traveling or about to embark on a journey.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m on the road to visit my family for the holidays.”
  • In a conversation about upcoming plans, someone might ask, “When are you hitting the road?”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “On the road again, ready for new adventures!”

44. Off the street

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is not on the main street or usual route.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The restaurant is a bit off the street, but it’s worth the visit.”
  • In a discussion about hidden locations, someone might mention, “There’s a great coffee shop just off the street, tucked away in an alley.”
  • A traveler might ask for recommendations, saying, “Any good places to explore off the street?”

45. On the way

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something is currently in the process of traveling or making progress towards a destination.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m on the way to the store, I’ll be back soon.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up, someone might ask, “Are you on the way?”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “On the way to my next adventure, can’t wait!”
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