Top 48 Slang For Misery – Meaning & Usage

Life can throw us curveballs, and sometimes we find ourselves in a state of misery. But fear not, for we at Fluentslang have got your back. We’ve put together a list of the top slang for misery that will have you nodding in recognition and maybe even cracking a smile at the clever ways people express their woes. So sit back, grab a cup of tea, and get ready to dive into the world of relatable lingo for those not-so-great days.

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1. Agony

Agony is a term used to describe intense suffering, whether it be physical or mental. It is often associated with a feeling of being trapped or overwhelmed by pain.

  • For example, someone might say, “I was in agony after breaking my leg.”
  • In a discussion about emotional pain, a person might share, “Going through a breakup can cause a lot of agony.”
  • Another might express, “The agony of losing a loved one is indescribable.”

2. Woe

Woe refers to a state of deep sadness or distress. It often conveys a sense of sorrow or misfortune.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I am filled with woe after losing my job.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, a person might share, “I’ve been through a lot of woe in my life.”
  • Another might express, “The woe of losing a loved one is a pain that never truly goes away.”

3. Anguish

Anguish is a term used to describe severe mental or emotional pain. It often conveys a sense of deep suffering or torment.

  • For example, someone might say, “I am filled with anguish over the loss of a loved one.”
  • In a discussion about personal struggles, a person might share, “I’ve experienced anguish throughout my life.”
  • Another might express, “The anguish of a broken heart can be unbearable.”

4. Torment

Torment refers to severe physical or mental suffering. It often conveys a sense of being tortured or haunted by pain.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I was tormented by nightmares.”
  • In a conversation about emotional pain, a person might share, “I’ve been through years of torment.”
  • Another might express, “The torment of addiction is a constant battle.”

5. Despair

Despair is a term used to describe a state of hopelessness or deep sadness. It often conveys a sense of giving up or feeling utterly defeated.

  • For example, someone might say, “I felt despair after losing everything.”
  • In a discussion about personal struggles, a person might share, “I’ve experienced moments of despair.”
  • Another might express, “The despair of being alone can be overwhelming.”

6. Grief

Grief refers to intense sorrow or deep sadness, often caused by a significant loss or tragedy. It is a feeling of emotional pain and distress.

  • For example, “She went through a period of grief after her father passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t imagine the grief she must be feeling after losing her child.”
  • In a discussion about coping with grief, someone might offer advice like, “It’s important to allow yourself to grieve and seek support from loved ones.”

7. Heartache

Heartache is a term used to describe intense emotional pain or distress, often related to a romantic or personal loss. It refers to the deep sorrow and longing one feels in their heart.

  • For instance, “Going through a breakup can cause a lot of heartache.”
  • A person might say, “She experienced a lot of heartache after her best friend betrayed her.”
  • In a discussion about overcoming heartache, someone might suggest, “Taking time for self-care and surrounding yourself with positive influences can help heal heartache.”

8. Suffering

Suffering refers to the state of experiencing physical or emotional pain and distress. It can also encompass enduring hardship or going through a difficult situation.

  • For example, “People living in poverty often experience a great deal of suffering.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been suffering from chronic pain for years.”
  • In a discussion about empathy, someone might say, “We should strive to alleviate the suffering of others whenever possible.”

9. Melancholy

Melancholy is a state of deep sadness or sorrow, often with a pensive or reflective quality. It is a mood or feeling of gloom and despondency.

  • For instance, “Walking through the rain always makes me feel a bit melancholy.”
  • A person might say, “He has a tendency to retreat into melancholy when he’s feeling down.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might describe a painting as “evoking a sense of melancholy.”

10. Misery

Misery refers to extreme unhappiness or suffering. It is a state of deep distress and despair. It is often used to describe a prolonged period of intense unhappiness.

  • For example, “She lived in misery after the loss of her child.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand to see her in such misery.”
  • In a discussion about difficult life circumstances, someone might say, “It’s important to find ways to escape the cycle of misery and seek help.”

11. Tribulation

This refers to a period of difficulty or suffering. It can also imply a testing or challenging experience.

  • For example, “She went through many tribulations in her life, but she always managed to overcome them.”
  • In a religious context, someone might say, “I believe that tribulations make us stronger in our faith.”
  • A person discussing their struggles might say, “I’ve faced many tribulations, but I’m still standing.”

12. Affliction

This term refers to a state of physical or mental distress, often caused by illness or hardship.

  • For instance, “He was diagnosed with a chronic affliction that caused him constant pain.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “Depression is a common affliction that many people face.”
  • A person expressing their struggles might say, “I’m tired of living with this affliction every day.”

13. Desolation

This word describes a state of extreme sadness, loneliness, or emptiness. It can also refer to a place that is deserted or uninhabited.

  • For example, “After the breakup, she felt a deep sense of desolation.”
  • In a post-apocalyptic novel, a character might describe a desolate landscape, saying, “The desolation stretched as far as the eye could see.”
  • A person expressing their feelings might say, “I’m drowning in a sea of desolation.”

14. Dismay

This term describes a feeling of sadness, distress, or disappointment, often caused by an unexpected event or outcome.

  • For instance, “She looked at her failed test with dismay.”
  • In a discussion about current events, someone might say, “The state of the world fills me with dismay.”
  • A person expressing their feelings might say, “I felt a sense of deep dismay when I heard the news.”

15. Disconsolation

This word refers to a state of extreme sadness or sorrow, often accompanied by a feeling of hopelessness or despair.

  • For example, “She experienced disconsolation after the loss of her loved one.”
  • In a discussion about personal struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been living in a state of disconsolation for months.”
  • A person expressing their feelings might say, “I can’t shake this overwhelming sense of disconsolation.”

16. Lament

To express deep sorrow or grief, often through mourning or wailing.

  • For example, “She lamented the loss of her loved one at the funeral.”
  • In a poem about heartbreak, the writer might say, “I lament the end of our love.”
  • A character in a sad movie might be shown lamenting over a broken relationship.
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17. Rue

To feel regret or remorse for something that has happened or been done.

  • For instance, “He rues the day he decided to quit his job.”
  • In a conversation about past mistakes, someone might say, “I still rue the decision I made years ago.”
  • A person might express rue by saying, “I rue the missed opportunities in my life.”

18. Sorrow

A deep feeling of sadness or grief, often accompanied by tears or a heavy heart.

  • For example, “She was filled with sorrow after the loss of her pet.”
  • A person might say, “My heart is heavy with sorrow.”
  • In a song about lost love, the lyrics might express, “I drown in sorrow every night.”

19. Woefulness

A state of extreme unhappiness or misery, often characterized by sadness and despair.

  • For instance, “She lived her life in woefulness, never finding true happiness.”
  • In a discussion about depression, someone might say, “The depths of woefulness can be overwhelming.”
  • A person experiencing a series of unfortunate events might exclaim, “What a life filled with woefulness!”

20. Bleakness

A state of desolation or emptiness, often lacking hope or optimism for the future.

  • For example, “The bleakness of the situation made it hard to see a way out.”
  • In a conversation about a depressing movie, someone might say, “The film captured the bleakness of life in a war-torn country.”
  • A person might describe their outlook on life as, “I see nothing but bleakness ahead.”

21. Despondency

Despondency refers to a state of deep unhappiness or despair. It is often characterized by a lack of motivation or enthusiasm.

  • For example, “After losing her job, she fell into a state of despondency.”
  • A person experiencing despondency might say, “I feel like there’s no point in anything.”
  • Describing someone’s mood, one might say, “He has been overwhelmed by despondency lately.”

22. Forlornness

Forlornness is a state of being abandoned or feeling lonely and neglected. It often involves a sense of sadness and isolation.

  • For instance, “She sat alone in the park, consumed by a feeling of forlornness.”
  • A person experiencing forlornness might say, “I feel like no one cares about me.”
  • Describing a desolate place, one might say, “The abandoned house had an aura of forlornness.”

23. Miserableness

Miserableness refers to a state of extreme unhappiness or discomfort. It is often associated with feelings of sadness, despair, and dissatisfaction.

  • For example, “The relentless rain added to the miserableness of the day.”
  • A person feeling miserable might say, “I can’t shake off this feeling of miserableness.”
  • Describing a situation, one might say, “The long wait at the airport added to the overall miserableness of the trip.”

24. Pathos

Pathos is a term used to describe something that evokes feelings of pity, sadness, or sympathy. It often refers to a quality in art, literature, or music that elicits an emotional response.

  • For instance, “The movie’s ending had a strong sense of pathos.”
  • A person moved by a sad story might say, “The pathos of the character’s situation was overwhelming.”
  • Describing a painting, one might say, “The artist captured a deep sense of pathos in the subject’s eyes.”

25. Pity

Pity is a feeling of sorrow or compassion for someone who is suffering or in a difficult situation. It often involves a sense of sympathy and a desire to help.

  • For example, “She looked at the homeless man with pity in her eyes.”
  • A person feeling pity might say, “I can’t help but feel pity for those less fortunate.”
  • Describing an act of kindness, one might say, “He showed great pity by offering to help.”

26. Sufferance

This term refers to the act of enduring something unpleasant or difficult. It implies a state of suffering or discomfort that one must bear.

  • For example, “I’m in a state of sufferance as I wait for my test results.”
  • In a discussion about difficult work conditions, someone might say, “I can’t continue in this job if it means constant sufferance.”
  • A person describing a long and painful recovery from an injury might say, “It was a year of sufferance, but I finally regained full mobility.”

27. Unhappiness

This word describes a state of not being happy or feeling sorrowful. It refers to a general feeling of discontent or dissatisfaction.

  • For instance, “She couldn’t hide her unhappiness after receiving the bad news.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been battling with unhappiness for a while now.”
  • A person discussing the effects of a difficult situation might say, “Unhappiness can have a negative impact on one’s mental and physical health.”

28. Vexation

This term refers to a feeling of irritation or annoyance caused by something or someone. It implies a sense of frustration or exasperation.

  • For example, “The constant noise outside my window is a source of vexation.”
  • In a discussion about daily challenges, someone might say, “Dealing with traffic can be a major vexation.”
  • A person describing a difficult coworker might say, “Their constant criticism is a constant vexation.”

29. Aggravation

This word describes a feeling of annoyance or irritation that is intensified or made worse by certain circumstances. It implies a sense of exasperation or increased difficulty.

  • For instance, “The malfunctioning printer is causing a lot of aggravation in the office.”
  • In a conversation about dealing with bureaucracy, someone might say, “The amount of paperwork involved is a major source of aggravation.”
  • A person discussing a challenging project might say, “The tight deadline is adding to the aggravation.”

30. Disappointment

This term refers to a feeling of sadness or dissatisfaction that arises from unmet expectations or hopes. It implies a sense of disillusionment or discouragement.

  • For example, “Her disappointment was evident when she didn’t receive the promotion.”
  • In a discussion about failed plans, someone might say, “The cancellation of the trip was a huge disappointment.”
  • A person describing a disappointing movie might say, “The film had so much potential, but it turned out to be a major disappointment.”

31. Sorrowfulness

Sorrowfulness refers to a state of being deeply sad or experiencing intense grief.

  • For example, “She couldn’t shake off her sorrowfulness after the loss of her pet.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t help but feel a sense of sorrowfulness when I think about my past mistakes.”
  • In a poem, the writer might describe the protagonist’s sorrowfulness as “a heavy weight on their heart.”

32. Tearfulness

Tearfulness is the act of crying excessively or being prone to frequent bouts of tears.

  • For instance, “She couldn’t control her tearfulness as she watched the emotional movie.”
  • A person might say, “Whenever I’m stressed, I tend to experience moments of tearfulness.”
  • In a therapy session, a psychologist might discuss the connection between tearfulness and unresolved emotions.
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33. Troublesomeness

Troublesomeness refers to the quality of being difficult or burdensome.

  • For example, “The troublesomeness of the situation made it hard to find a solution.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle the troublesomeness of this job anymore.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might point out the troublesomeness of a particular team member’s behavior.

34. Vexatiousness

Vexatiousness refers to the quality of causing annoyance or frustration.

  • For instance, “The constant interruptions were a source of vexatiousness for the speaker.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand the vexatiousness of their constant complaints.”
  • In a review, a customer might mention the vexatiousness of a company’s customer service.

35. Wretchedness

Wretchedness refers to a state of extreme unhappiness or misery.

  • For example, “The wretchedness of her situation was evident in her tear-stained face.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve never experienced such wretchedness in my life.”
  • In a novel, the author might describe the protagonist’s wretchedness as “a bottomless pit of despair.”

36. Angst

Angst refers to a feeling of deep anxiety or dread. It is often used to describe a sense of unease or apprehension about the future.

  • For example, “I have so much angst about the upcoming exam.”
  • A character in a book might express their angst by saying, “I feel like I’m drowning in my own thoughts.”
  • A teenager might describe their angst by saying, “I just can’t shake this feeling of unease.”

37. Disheartenment

Disheartenment refers to a feeling of discouragement or hopelessness. It is often used to describe a state of mind where one feels defeated or demoralized.

  • For instance, “After failing the test, he felt a deep sense of disheartenment.”
  • A person going through a tough time might say, “I’m overwhelmed with disheartenment right now.”
  • A character in a movie might express their disheartenment by saying, “I don’t know if I can go on anymore.”

38. Disquiet

Disquiet refers to a feeling of unease or restlessness. It is often used to describe a sense of discomfort or agitation that one cannot easily shake off.

  • For example, “He couldn’t sleep because of the disquiet in his mind.”
  • A person experiencing disquiet might say, “I have this constant feeling of unease.”
  • A character in a book might describe their disquiet by saying, “I feel like something bad is about to happen.”

39. Dolefulness

Dolefulness refers to a feeling of sadness or sorrow. It is often used to describe a state of deep grief or melancholy.

  • For instance, “The dolefulness in her eyes was impossible to ignore.”
  • A person experiencing dolefulness might say, “I feel an overwhelming sense of sadness.”
  • A character in a movie might express their dolefulness by saying, “I don’t know how to escape this feeling of sorrow.”

40. Dolor

Dolor refers to intense physical or emotional pain. It is often used to describe a deep sense of suffering or anguish.

  • For example, “She was consumed by dolor after the loss of her loved one.”
  • A person in therapy might describe their dolor by saying, “I carry so much pain inside me.”
  • A character in a novel might express their dolor by saying, “I can’t bear this agony anymore.”

41. Lachrymosity

Lachrymosity refers to the tendency to cry easily or frequently. It is often used to describe someone who is overly emotional or sensitive.

  • For example, “She has a lachrymosity that makes her cry at the slightest provocation.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t watch sad movies because they always trigger my lachrymosity.”
  • Another might comment, “Her lachrymosity can be exhausting to deal with sometimes.”

42. Wistfulness

Wistfulness refers to a feeling of longing or yearning for something that is unattainable or lost. It often carries a sense of sadness or nostalgia.

  • For instance, “He looked at the old photographs with wistfulness in his eyes.”
  • A person might say, “I often feel a sense of wistfulness when I think about my childhood.”
  • Another might comment, “There’s a certain wistfulness in her voice when she talks about her past.”

43. Misfortune

Misfortune refers to bad luck or unfortunate events that happen to someone. It implies a sense of hardship or difficulty.

  • For example, “He has had a string of misfortunes lately.”
  • A person might say, “I seem to attract misfortune wherever I go.”
  • Another might comment, “Despite all the misfortunes she has faced, she remains resilient.”

44. Pain

Pain refers to physical or emotional discomfort that someone experiences. It can range from mild to severe and is often used to describe a feeling of suffering or distress.

  • For instance, “She winced in pain as she twisted her ankle.”
  • A person might say, “The pain of losing a loved one is indescribable.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t bear the pain of seeing him with someone else.”

45. Miserable

Miserable refers to a state of extreme unhappiness or unpleasantness. It describes a feeling of intense misery or distress.

  • For example, “She felt miserable after the breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I had a miserable day at work.”
  • Another might comment, “The weather was so miserable that we couldn’t go outside.”

46. Distress

This term refers to extreme suffering, pain, or anguish. It is often used to describe a state of emotional or mental turmoil.

  • For instance, someone going through a difficult breakup might say, “I’m in distress over the end of my relationship.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might share, “I’ve been experiencing distressing thoughts lately.”
  • A character in a novel might exclaim, “I can’t bear this distress any longer!”

47. Tragedy

Tragedy refers to a disastrous or unfortunate event that causes great suffering or distress. It can also refer to a work of art, such as a play or novel, that portrays such events.

  • For example, “The death of a loved one is a tragedy that affects us deeply.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’ is a classic tragedy.”
  • A news headline might read, “Mass shooting at school leaves community in tragedy.”

48. Hardship

Hardship refers to a state of enduring difficult or challenging circumstances. It often implies a period of struggle or adversity.

  • For instance, a person experiencing financial difficulties might say, “I’m going through a period of extreme hardship.”
  • In a discussion about resilience, someone might share, “Overcoming hardship builds character and strength.”
  • A character in a movie might declare, “I’ve faced many hardships in my life, but I never gave up.”