Top 37 Slang For Discovery – Meaning & Usage

Embark on a linguistic adventure with us as we uncover the latest and greatest slang for discovery. From trendy terms to hidden gems, we’ve got you covered with a curated list that will have you feeling like a language connoisseur in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to expand your lexicon in the most exciting way possible!

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1. Find out

This phrase is used to indicate the act of learning or uncovering information or facts that were previously unknown.

  • For example, “I need to find out what time the concert starts.”
  • A person might say, “I found out that my favorite restaurant closed down.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Guess what I found out about our neighbor!”

2. Uncover

To uncover means to reveal or expose something that was previously hidden or unknown.

  • For instance, “The detective was able to uncover the truth about the crime.”
  • A person might say, “I uncovered some interesting documents while cleaning out the attic.”
  • Another might share, “I uncovered a secret about my friend that I never knew before.”

3. Stumble upon

This phrase is used to describe the act of discovering something unexpectedly or accidentally.

  • For example, “While hiking in the woods, I stumbled upon an old abandoned cabin.”
  • A person might say, “I stumbled upon a great new coffee shop while walking through the city.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Guess what I stumbled upon in the back of my closet!”

4. Dig up

To dig up means to uncover or bring to light something that was buried or hidden.

  • For instance, “Archaeologists dig up ancient artifacts to learn about past civilizations.”
  • A person might say, “I dug up some old photos from my childhood.”
  • Another might share, “I dug up some interesting information while doing research for my project.”

5. Hit upon

This phrase is used to describe the act of accidentally or unexpectedly discovering something.

  • For example, “I hit upon a great idea while taking a shower.”
  • A person might say, “I hit upon a solution to the problem just when I was about to give up.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Guess what I hit upon while cleaning out the garage!”

6. Come across

This phrase is used when you unexpectedly find or discover something or someone. It implies that the discovery was accidental or unintentional.

  • For example, “I came across an old photo album while cleaning out my attic.”
  • Someone might say, “I came across an interesting article online that I thought you might like.”
  • In a conversation about travel, a person might mention, “I came across a hidden gem of a restaurant while exploring the city.”

7. Turn up

This phrase is used to indicate finding or discovering something or someone, often after searching or looking for them.

  • For instance, “I turned up my missing keys under the couch cushions.”
  • A person might say, “I turned up some old letters from my grandparents in the attic.”
  • In a discussion about a missing person, someone might ask, “Have any new leads turned up in the investigation?”

8. Learn of

This phrase is used to indicate hearing about or discovering something for the first time. It implies that the information was previously unknown.

  • For example, “I just learned of a new restaurant opening in town.”
  • Someone might say, “I learned of a great sale happening this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about current events, a person might mention, “I just learned of a new government policy that will affect us all.”

9. Ferret out

This phrase is used to indicate discovering or finding something through persistent and determined searching or investigation. It implies that the discovery required effort and perseverance.

  • For instance, “After hours of research, I finally ferreted out the answer to the puzzle.”
  • A person might say, “I was able to ferret out the truth behind the rumors.”
  • In a discussion about a hidden treasure, someone might ask, “How did they manage to ferret out the treasure’s location?”

10. Dredge up

This phrase is used to indicate bringing something to light or uncovering something that was forgotten or hidden. It implies that the discovery may be unpleasant or unwanted.

  • For example, “Her comments dredged up painful memories from the past.”
  • Someone might say, “The documentary dredged up a lot of controversy surrounding the topic.”
  • In a conversation about a scandal, a person might mention, “The media loves to dredge up old stories to create drama.”

11. Light upon

To come across or discover something unexpectedly or by chance. “Light upon” is often used to describe a serendipitous or fortunate discovery.

  • For example, “While exploring the attic, I lighted upon an old photo album.”
  • A person might say, “I was walking in the park when I lighted upon a hidden trail.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I never expected to light upon such a rare gem at the flea market!”

12. Chance upon

To find or encounter something by luck or coincidence. “Chance upon” implies a random or unplanned discovery.

  • For instance, “I was wandering through the bookstore when I chanced upon a signed copy of my favorite author’s book.”
  • A person might say, “I chanced upon a beautiful beach while exploring the coastline.”
  • Another might share, “I never thought I’d chance upon an old family heirloom in the attic!”

13. Spot

To see or observe something, often unexpectedly or from a distance. “Spot” can refer to the act of discovering something or someone visually.

  • For example, “I spotted a rare bird in the tree outside my window.”
  • A person might say, “I spotted a familiar face in the crowd at the concert.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t believe I spotted a celebrity while walking down the street!”

14. Identify

To determine or discover the identity or nature of something or someone. “Identify” implies the act of correctly recognizing or naming something.

  • For instance, “I was able to identify the species of the plant based on its unique leaves.”
  • A person might say, “I can identify that song by just hearing a few notes.”
  • Another might share, “I couldn’t identify the person in the photograph until someone pointed out their name.”

15. Realize

To understand or comprehend something, often after a period of time or reflection. “Realize” can refer to the act of discovering or understanding a truth or fact.

  • For example, “I didn’t realize how much I missed my hometown until I visited.”
  • A person might say, “I realized I had made a mistake after it was too late.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t believe it took me so long to realize the answer was right in front of me!”

16. Unearth

To uncover or bring to light something that was previously unknown or hidden. “Unearth” is often used metaphorically to describe the process of finding or revealing information or secrets.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I unearthed new evidence that could change the course of the investigation.”
  • A historian might write, “Through extensive research, I was able to unearth previously unknown details about the ancient civilization.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might reflect, “Traveling helped me unearth a deeper understanding of myself.”

17. Detect

To perceive or identify something using one’s senses or specialized equipment. “Detect” is commonly used to describe the process of discovering or noticing something, especially something that is not easily visible or obvious.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “We were able to detect a small amount of a rare element in the sample.”
  • A detective in a crime novel might exclaim, “I detected a faint odor of gasoline at the crime scene, suggesting the presence of an accelerant.”
  • In a conversation about food allergies, someone might ask, “Can you detect any traces of peanuts in this dish?”

18. Unravel

To solve or understand something that is complex or mysterious. “Unravel” is often used metaphorically to describe the process of unraveling a problem or uncovering the truth.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I finally unraveled the mystery and discovered the true identity of the culprit.”
  • A researcher might write, “Through years of study, we unraveled the genetic code of this rare species.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might reflect, “It took time, but I unraveled the complexities of my partner’s emotions.”

19. Expose

To make something known or visible that was previously hidden or secret. “Expose” is often used to describe the act of bringing something to light or revealing the truth.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I exposed the corruption within the government through my investigative reporting.”
  • A whistleblower might say, “I decided to expose the company’s unethical practices to protect the public.”
  • In a conversation about art, someone might comment, “The artist’s work exposes the raw emotions and struggles of the human experience.”

20. Suss out

To understand or discover something through careful observation or investigation. “Suss out” is a colloquial term often used to describe the process of figuring out or uncovering information.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I need more time to suss out the suspect’s alibi.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you suss out if they’re telling the truth?”
  • In a conversation about a complex problem, someone might suggest, “Let’s suss out the root cause before coming up with a solution.”

21. Pinpoint

To pinpoint something means to identify or locate it with great accuracy or precision.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to pinpoint the exact time of the crime.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might say, “We were able to pinpoint the source of the problem.”
  • Someone searching for a specific item might say, “I finally pinpointed the exact location of my lost keys.”

22. Dope out

To dope out means to figure out or solve a problem or mystery through careful thinking or analysis.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We need to dope out who the real culprit is.”
  • A person trying to solve a difficult math problem might say, “I spent hours trying to dope out the solution.”
  • In a complex situation, someone might say, “Let’s sit down and dope out a plan together.”

23. Finders keepers

Finders keepers is a phrase used to assert that the person who finds something is entitled to keep it.

  • For example, if someone finds a lost wallet on the street, they might say, “Finders keepers!”
  • A child who discovers a toy left behind might say, “Finders keepers, it’s mine now!”
  • In a playful argument over a found treasure, someone might say, “Finders keepers, losers weepers!”

24. Strike gold

To strike gold means to find something valuable or highly desired, often unexpectedly or by chance.

  • For instance, a treasure hunter might say, “We struck gold when we found this ancient artifact.”
  • Someone who discovers a rare collectible might say, “I can’t believe I struck gold at the antique shop.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We struck gold with this new product, it’s selling like crazy!”

25. Hit the jackpot

To hit the jackpot means to experience great success or luck, often in a financial or fortunate sense.

  • For example, a person who wins a large sum of money in a lottery might say, “I hit the jackpot!”
  • Someone who finds the perfect job might say, “I really hit the jackpot with this opportunity.”
  • In a game of chance, a person who wins a big prize might say, “I can’t believe I hit the jackpot!”

26. Score

To “score” means to find or obtain something, often something desirable or valuable. This term is commonly used when talking about finding something unexpectedly or making a lucky discovery.

  • For example, a person might say, “I scored a vintage record at the flea market.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might mention, “I scored a great deal on these shoes.”
  • A friend might share, “I scored tickets to the concert tonight!”

27. Make a find

To “make a find” means to discover something valuable or significant. This phrase is often used when talking about finding something unexpected or uncovering something of importance.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I made a find at the antique store – a rare coin!”
  • In a discussion about archaeology, someone might mention, “Archaeologists often make incredible finds during their excavations.”
  • A friend might share, “I made a find in my attic – a box of old family photos!”

28. Lay Eyes On

To “lay eyes on” something means to see or find it. This phrase is often used when talking about discovering or encountering something for the first time.

  • For example, a person might say, “I finally laid eyes on the famous painting in person.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “I can’t wait to lay eyes on the Eiffel Tower.”
  • A friend might share, “I just laid eyes on the cutest puppy at the shelter!”

29. Get wind of

To “get wind of” something means to hear about or discover it, often through rumors or gossip. This phrase is commonly used when talking about finding out information or learning about something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I got wind of a new restaurant opening in town.”
  • In a discussion about news, someone might mention, “I got wind of a major announcement happening tomorrow.”
  • A friend might share, “I just got wind of a surprise party being planned for me!”

30. Snoop out

To “snoop out” something means to discover or find it through investigation or snooping around. This phrase is often used when talking about uncovering information or finding something hidden.

  • For example, a person might say, “I snooped out the truth about what happened.”
  • In a conversation about detective work, someone might mention, “Detectives have to snoop out clues to solve crimes.”
  • A friend might share, “I snooped out the perfect gift for my partner!”

31. Fish out

To discover or uncover something that was hidden or hard to find.

  • For example, “After hours of searching, I finally managed to fish out my lost keys from the couch.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to fish out any clues that could lead us to the suspect.”
  • In a treasure hunt, a participant might exclaim, “I can’t wait to fish out the hidden treasure!”

32. Root out

To eliminate or find something by searching thoroughly.

  • For instance, “We need to root out the source of the problem to fix it.”
  • A gardener might say, “I’m trying to root out all the weeds in my garden.”
  • In a political context, someone might argue, “We need to root out corruption in our government.”

33. Lay bare

To expose or reveal something that was previously hidden or secret.

  • For example, “The investigation laid bare the truth behind the scandal.”
  • A journalist might say, “I aim to lay bare the corruption within the company.”
  • In a personal context, someone might confess, “I decided to lay bare my emotions and share my true feelings.”

34. Ascertain

To determine or verify something with certainty.

  • For instance, “We need to ascertain the cause of the problem before we can fix it.”
  • A scientist might say, “Through experimentation, we can ascertain the accuracy of our hypothesis.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might ask, “Can you ascertain the defendant’s whereabouts on the night of the crime?”

35. Ferret around

To search or investigate thoroughly to find something.

  • For example, “I spent hours ferreting around my room for my missing phone.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to ferret around the crime scene for any clues.”
  • In a scavenger hunt, a participant might exclaim, “Let’s ferret around this area to find the hidden object!”

36. Crack the code

This phrase means to solve or understand a complex problem or mystery. It is often used metaphorically to describe the act of unraveling something that is difficult or puzzling.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to crack the code to solve this murder case.”
  • In a technological context, someone might say, “I finally cracked the code and figured out how to bypass the system.”
  • A person discussing a difficult puzzle might say, “It took me hours, but I finally cracked the code and completed the crossword.”

37. Figure out

This phrase means to find a solution or answer to a problem or mystery. It is a more general term for discovering or understanding something that was previously unknown or unclear.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to figure out how to solve this math problem.”
  • In a relationship context, someone might say, “We need to figure out how to communicate better.”
  • A person discussing a challenging situation might say, “I’m not sure how to handle this, but I’ll figure it out.”
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