Top 43 Slang For Dispatch – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying current with the latest lingo, Slang For Dispatch is where it’s at. From radio codes to industry-specific terms, navigating the world of dispatch jargon can be a challenge. But fear not, our team has done the legwork to bring you a collection of the most essential dispatch slang that will have you speaking the language of the professionals in no time. So buckle up and get ready to dive into this listicle that will have you feeling like a dispatch pro in no time!

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1. Route

This term refers to the act of sending or directing something or someone along a particular path or course. In the context of dispatch, it means to send a message or call to a specific location or person.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “Please route this call to the nearest available unit.”
  • In a logistics company, a manager might instruct, “Route all deliveries to the warehouse for sorting.”
  • A dispatcher might ask, “Can you route the message to Officer Smith’s patrol car?”

2. Forward

To forward means to send something, such as a message or call, to another person or location. In dispatch slang, it often refers to sending a call or message to the appropriate person or department.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might say, “Please forward this call to the supervisor.”
  • In a customer service center, an employee might forward a customer’s complaint to the relevant department.
  • A dispatcher might instruct, “Forward all urgent messages to the on-call technician.”

3. Transfer

In dispatch slang, to transfer means to move something or someone from one location or department to another. It can refer to transferring a call or message to a different dispatcher or transferring a person to a different department or location.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “Please transfer this call to the night shift.”
  • In a hospital, a nurse might transfer a patient from the emergency room to a specialized unit.
  • A dispatcher might ask, “Can you transfer the message to the supervisor’s office?”

4. Relay

To relay means to pass on or transmit information or a message from one person or location to another. In dispatch slang, it often refers to passing on important information or instructions to the appropriate person or department.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might say, “Please relay this message to all units in the field.”
  • In a call center, an operator might relay a customer’s request to a supervisor.
  • A dispatcher might instruct, “Relay the instructions to the on-site technician.”

5. Convey

In dispatch slang, to convey means to communicate or transmit information or instructions. It involves expressing or making something known to others.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “Convey the updated route to the driver.”
  • In a shipping company, a manager might convey the delivery schedule to the warehouse team.
  • A dispatcher might ask, “Can you convey the message to the recipient?”

6. Dispatchment

Dispatchment refers to the act of sending something out or delivering it to its intended destination. It is often used in the context of sending goods or packages.

  • For example, a logistics company might say, “Our dispatchment process ensures timely delivery of your packages.”
  • A person discussing shipping might ask, “What is the dispatchment time for this item?”
  • Another might say, “I need to arrange the dispatchment of these documents as soon as possible.”

7. Despatch

Despatch is an alternative spelling of dispatch and has the same meaning. It refers to the act of sending something quickly or promptly.

  • For instance, a courier company might advertise, “We offer same-day despatch for urgent deliveries.”
  • A person might say, “Please despatch this order as soon as possible.”
  • In a business setting, someone might ask, “What is the despatch process for this product?”

8. Send on

Send on refers to the act of forwarding something to another location or recipient. It is often used when redirecting mail or packages to a different address.

  • For example, a person might say, “Please send on my mail to my new address.”
  • In a discussion about logistics, someone might ask, “What is the process for sending on packages to a different location?”
  • Another might say, “I need to send on this document to a colleague in another office.”

9. Consign

Consign refers to the act of sending something for delivery or shipment. It is often used in the context of commercial or bulk transportation.

  • For instance, a shipping company might say, “We offer consign services for businesses looking to send large quantities of products.”
  • A person might ask, “How can I consign this package for delivery?”
  • In a logistics discussion, someone might say, “We need to consign these goods to multiple locations.”

10. Expedite

Expedite refers to the act of speeding up or expediting the dispatch process. It is often used when there is a need for urgent or priority delivery.

  • For example, a customer might request, “Can you expedite the dispatch of my order?”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “We need to expedite the dispatch of these documents to meet the deadline.”
  • A logistics manager might discuss the importance of expediting dispatch to ensure timely delivery.

11. Express

This term refers to a quick and efficient delivery service. It implies that the item will be delivered promptly and without delay.

  • For example, “I need this package to be sent express so it arrives tomorrow.”
  • A customer might request, “Can you please send this express? I need it urgently.”
  • A shipping company might advertise, “Choose our express service for guaranteed next-day delivery.”

12. Conveyance

This word refers to the act of transporting or moving goods from one place to another. It can also refer to the vehicle or method used for transportation.

  • For instance, “The conveyance of goods from the warehouse to the store is handled by a logistics company.”
  • In a discussion about shipping methods, one might say, “Airplanes are a common conveyance for international shipments.”
  • A person might ask, “What is the best conveyance for delivering fragile items?”

13. Shipment

This term refers to a group of items or goods that are being transported together. It can be used to describe the act of sending or receiving a package.

  • For example, “I received a shipment of books from an online bookstore.”
  • A customer might inquire, “When can I expect my shipment to arrive?”
  • A shipping company might advertise, “We offer fast and reliable shipment services.”

14. Delivery

This word refers to the act of bringing or transporting goods to a specific location, usually as part of a service. It can also refer to the item being delivered.

  • For instance, “The delivery of groceries is becoming increasingly popular.”
  • In a discussion about online shopping, one might say, “I prefer delivery over going to the store.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you offer free delivery for this item?”

15. Conveyancing

This term refers to the legal process of transferring property or assets from one person or entity to another. It is often used in the context of real estate transactions.

  • For example, “The conveyancing of the house took several weeks to complete.”
  • A lawyer might explain, “Conveyancing involves various legal documents and checks.”
  • A person might ask, “Do I need a conveyancing solicitor for selling my property?”

16. Freight

Freight refers to goods or cargo that are transported in bulk by truck, train, ship, or aircraft. It can also be used as a verb to mean the action of transporting goods.

  • For example, “The freight on that train is carrying a shipment of electronics.”
  • A person might say, “I need to freight these boxes to the warehouse.”
  • In a discussion about logistics, someone might ask, “What’s the most efficient way to transport freight across the country?”

17. Haul

Haul is a term used to describe the act of transporting or moving goods or cargo from one place to another. It can also refer to the distance covered during transportation.

  • For instance, “The truck made a long haul from the factory to the distribution center.”
  • A person might say, “I have a haul of goods that needs to be delivered by tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about shipping, someone might ask, “What’s the average haul distance for a truck driver?”

18. Carriage

Carriage refers to the act of transporting goods or passengers from one place to another. It can also refer to the vehicle or container used for transportation.

  • For example, “The carriage of goods by sea is a common practice in international trade.”
  • A person might say, “I need a carriage to transport these items.”
  • In a discussion about public transportation, someone might ask, “What’s the average carriage capacity of a subway train?”

19. Transit

Transit refers to the movement or transportation of goods or people from one place to another. It can also refer to the act of passing through or across a place.

  • For instance, “The transit of goods through customs can sometimes be delayed.”
  • A person might say, “I need to arrange the transit of these packages.”
  • In a conversation about commuting, someone might ask, “What’s the average transit time for a bus ride?”

20. Passage

Passage refers to the act of transporting or delivering goods or people from one place to another. It can also refer to a journey or trip.

  • For example, “The passage of goods through the supply chain can involve multiple stages.”
  • A person might say, “I need to arrange the passage of these documents.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might ask, “What’s the average passage time for a flight?”

21. Conveying

This term refers to the act of passing on or transmitting information or instructions to someone else. In the context of dispatch, it means relaying important details to the appropriate parties involved in a task or assignment.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “I’ll be conveying the updated route to the driver.”
  • When discussing the role of dispatch, someone might mention, “Conveying accurate and timely information is crucial for efficient operations.”
  • In a logistics company, a dispatcher might be responsible for conveying delivery instructions to the drivers.
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22. Forwarding

In the context of dispatch, forwarding refers to the action of sending a message, document, or package to the next recipient or destination. It involves passing on the item or information to the appropriate person or location.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might say, “I’ll be forwarding this urgent email to the supervisor.”
  • When discussing the responsibilities of a dispatcher, someone might mention, “Forwarding important documents to the relevant departments is a key task.”
  • In a shipping company, a dispatcher might be responsible for forwarding packages to the correct delivery drivers.

23. Sending

This term refers to the act of transmitting or dispatching something, such as a message, document, or package. In the context of dispatch, it means initiating the process of sending out information or items to the appropriate recipients.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “I’ll be sending the updated schedule to all team members.”
  • When discussing the role of dispatch, someone might mention, “Sending timely notifications to the relevant parties is essential for smooth operations.”
  • In a courier service, a dispatcher might be responsible for sending packages to the designated delivery addresses.

24. Run

In the context of dispatch, “run” refers to completing a task or assignment. It implies carrying out the necessary actions or operations to fulfill a specific request or requirement.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might say, “I’ll be assigning this run to Driver A.”
  • When discussing the responsibilities of a dispatcher, someone might mention, “Ensuring efficient execution of runs is a primary duty.”
  • In a taxi company, a dispatcher might be responsible for coordinating runs between drivers and passengers.

25. Ship

In the context of dispatch, “ship” refers to the process of sending or delivering goods to their intended destinations. It involves organizing and arranging the transportation of items to ensure their timely arrival.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “I’ll be shipping this package to the customer’s address.”
  • When discussing the role of dispatch, someone might mention, “Efficiently managing the shipping process is crucial for customer satisfaction.”
  • In an e-commerce company, a dispatcher might be responsible for shipping products to customers.
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26. Release

This term refers to the action of leaving a location or situation. In the context of dispatch, it often means that emergency responders or law enforcement personnel have finished their duties at a specific incident and can move on to the next call.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “Units can release from the accident scene.”
  • An officer might report, “I’m ready to release from this traffic stop.”
  • After providing medical assistance, a paramedic might request, “Can we get a release from the hospital?”

27. Assign

When dispatch assigns a call, it means they are designating a specific unit or individual to respond to a particular incident or task. This ensures that resources are properly distributed and that the appropriate personnel are dispatched to handle the situation.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might say, “I’m going to assign this call to Unit 5.”
  • An officer might report, “Dispatch, please assign me to the disturbance call.”
  • A firefighter might request, “Can you assign another engine to this structure fire?”

28. Call

In the context of dispatch, a “call” refers to an incident or situation that requires the response of emergency personnel, such as police, fire, or medical services. It can also refer to a phone call made to the dispatch center to report an emergency or request assistance.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “We have a call for a possible burglary in progress.”
  • A paramedic might report, “We’re en route to a medical call for a possible heart attack.”
  • An officer might request, “Can you give me the details on that last call?”

29. Code

In dispatch, “code” refers to a system of numbers or phrases used to convey specific messages or information quickly and efficiently over the radio. These codes are often used to indicate the nature of an incident, the urgency of a response, or to provide other important details.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might say, “Respond to the disturbance call, Code 2.”
  • An officer might report, “I’m on a Code 4 traffic stop, no further assistance needed.”
  • A firefighter might request, “Can you give me the code for hazardous materials incidents?”

30. 10-4

This phrase is a radio code used to indicate that a message has been received and understood. In dispatch, it is often used to confirm that an instruction or request has been acknowledged by the responding unit.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “Unit 5, can you respond to the accident on Main Street?” to which the officer would reply, “10-4, en route.”
  • An EMS unit might receive instructions from dispatch to “proceed to the hospital with lights and sirens” and respond with “10-4,“proceed to the hospital with lights and sirens” and respond with “10-4, we’re on our way.”
  • A firefighter might request additional resources and receive a confirmation of “10-4,“10-4, additional units are en route.”

31. En Route

This term is used to indicate that someone or something is on the way to a specific location or incident. It is often used in emergency situations or when providing updates on the progress of a response.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “I’m en route to the scene of the crime.”
  • A paramedic might radio in, “We’re en route with a patient to the hospital.”
  • A firefighter could report, “Engine 5 is en route to the reported fire location.”

32. Backup

This term is used to request additional support or assistance from other units or personnel. It is often used in situations where the initial response may require more resources or manpower.

  • For instance, a police officer might call for backup when dealing with a potentially dangerous suspect.
  • A security guard might radio for backup when encountering a large group of unruly individuals.
  • A paramedic might request backup when responding to a critical medical emergency.

33. ETA

This acronym is used to indicate the estimated time when someone or something is expected to arrive at a specific location. It is often used in dispatch communications to provide an estimated timeline for response or arrival.

  • For example, a tow truck driver might say, “My ETA to your location is 20 minutes.”
  • A delivery driver could inform the dispatcher, “My ETA for this package drop-off is 3:00 PM.”
  • A police officer might radio in, “ETA for backup is approximately 5 minutes.”

34. Clear

This term is used to indicate that a unit or individual has completed their assigned task or is no longer occupied with a particular incident. It is often used to update the status of a response or to inform dispatch that a unit is available for a new assignment.

  • For instance, a police officer might radio in, “I’m clear from the traffic stop and available for another assignment.”
  • A firefighter could report, “Engine 3 is clear from the fire scene and available for additional calls.”
  • A paramedic might inform dispatch, “We’re clear from the hospital and ready for the next call.”

35. All Units

This phrase is used to address or communicate with all units or personnel on a dispatch channel. It is often used to relay important information or to request a response from all available units.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “Attention all units, be on the lookout for a suspect matching the description.”
  • A police officer could radio in, “All units, please respond to the scene of a reported burglary.”
  • A firefighter might announce, “All units, be advised that the fire has been contained.”

36. Dispatched

This term is used to indicate that someone or something has been sent out or deployed to a specific location or incident.

  • For example, a dispatcher might say, “Unit 5, you are dispatched to a reported burglary.”
  • A first responder might radio in, “We have been dispatched to a car accident on Main Street.”
  • In a conversation about emergency services, someone might mention, “Once a call comes in, the appropriate units are dispatched to the scene.”

37. Respond

This term is used to describe the action of answering or reacting to a dispatch call or request for assistance.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “I need backup. Who can respond?”
  • A firefighter might radio in, “Engine 4 is responding to the structure fire.”
  • In a discussion about emergency services, someone might explain, “When a call comes in, it’s crucial for responders to quickly assess the situation and respond accordingly.”

38. On Scene

This term is used to indicate that someone or something has arrived at the scene or location of an incident or emergency.

  • For example, a paramedic might report, “Medic 1 is on scene and assessing the patient.”
  • A police officer might say, “I’m on scene. There are two vehicles involved in the accident.”
  • In a conversation about emergency response, someone might mention, “Once responders are on scene, they can begin providing the necessary assistance.”

39. Drop

This term is slang for leaving the scene or location of an incident or emergency.

  • For instance, a firefighter might say, “We can’t drop until the fire is fully extinguished.”
  • A police officer might radio in, “Suspect is in custody. I’m dropping from the scene.”
  • In a discussion about emergency services, someone might explain, “Once responders have completed their tasks and ensured everything is under control, they can drop from the scene.”

40. Ping

This term is used to describe the act of checking in or providing an update on one’s status or location.

  • For example, a paramedic might radio in, “Medic 3, pinging from the hospital.”
  • A police officer might say, “I’m pinging from the intersection of 5th and Main.”
  • In a conversation about emergency response, someone might mention, “It’s important for responders to regularly ping their location and status to maintain communication and coordination.”

41. Signal

A signal is a message or communication sent to convey information or instructions. In the context of dispatch, a signal is often used to indicate a specific action or request.

  • For example, a dispatcher might send a signal to a police officer to proceed to a certain location.
  • A firefighter might receive a signal to respond to a particular type of emergency.
  • In a dispatch center, a dispatcher might say, “Send a signal to all units to be on the lookout for a stolen vehicle.”

42. Task

A task refers to a specific job or assignment that needs to be completed. In the context of dispatch, a task is often given to a responder or unit to address a specific situation or request.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might assign a task to a maintenance crew to repair a broken water pipe.
  • A police officer might receive a task to investigate a reported crime.
  • In a dispatch center, a dispatcher might say, “We have a task for you. Please respond to a medical emergency at the corner of Main Street and Elm Avenue.”

43. Direct

To direct means to give clear instructions or guidance to someone. In the context of dispatch, directing is often used by dispatchers to provide specific directions or commands to responders or units.

  • For example, a dispatcher might direct a tow truck driver to a stranded vehicle location.
  • A paramedic might receive direct instructions from a dispatcher on how to provide medical assistance over the phone.
  • In a dispatch center, a dispatcher might say, “Direct all units to proceed to the scene of the accident immediately.”