Top 68 Slang For Navigation – Meaning & Usage

Navigation in the digital age has its own set of slang and terms that can sometimes be confusing for users. From GPS to maps to directions, keeping up with the latest navigation slang is essential for anyone trying to find their way around. Let us guide you through the maze of terminology with our curated list of the top slang for navigation. Get ready to level up your navigational skills and never get lost in translation again!

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1. GPS

A satellite-based navigation system that provides location and time information in all weather conditions, anywhere on or near the Earth. GPS is commonly used in navigation devices and smartphone apps to provide turn-by-turn directions.

  • For example, “I rely on my GPS to navigate through unfamiliar cities.”
  • A driver might say, “My GPS rerouted me to avoid traffic.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have a GPS app on your phone?”

A shortened form of the word “navigation,” referring to the act of planning and following a route to reach a destination. “Nav” is often used as a verb or noun to describe the process of finding one’s way.

  • For instance, “I’ll nav to the restaurant and meet you there.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not good at nav, so I always rely on GPS.”
  • In a conversation about road trips, someone might ask, “Who’s in charge of nav?”

3. Wayfinding

The act of finding one’s way in a physical environment, often without the use of technology. Wayfinding involves using landmarks, signs, and other visual cues to navigate.

  • For example, “The hiker relied on wayfinding skills to navigate the wilderness.”
  • Someone might say, “I enjoy the challenge of wayfinding in new cities.”
  • In a discussion about outdoor adventures, a person might ask, “How important is wayfinding in wilderness survival?”

4. Mapquest

A popular online mapping service that provides driving directions, maps, and other location-related information. Mapquest was one of the first widely-used digital mapping platforms.

  • For instance, “I used Mapquest to plan my road trip.”
  • A person might say, “Mapquest used to be my go-to for directions.”
  • In a conversation about navigation apps, someone might ask, “Do people still use Mapquest?”

5. Waze

A navigation app that relies on user-generated data to provide real-time traffic information, road conditions, and turn-by-turn directions. Waze encourages users to report accidents, hazards, and other incidents to help improve navigation for all users.

  • For example, “I love using Waze because it helps me avoid traffic.”
  • A driver might say, “Waze alerted me to a police speed trap up ahead.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you use Waze or another navigation app?”

6. Turn-by-turn

This refers to the process of receiving directions that guide a person from one location to another by providing instructions for each turn or maneuver along the way. “Turn-by-turn” is often used to describe GPS navigation systems or smartphone apps that provide real-time directions.

  • For example, a driver might say, “I rely on turn-by-turn directions to navigate through unfamiliar cities.”
  • When discussing the benefits of a navigation app, a user might mention, “I love that this app gives me turn-by-turn instructions so I don’t have to constantly look at a map.”
  • A person might ask, “Does this GPS device provide turn-by-turn guidance?”

7. Route-finding

This term refers to the process of determining the most efficient or optimal route from one location to another. It often involves considering factors such as distance, traffic conditions, and potential obstacles. “Route-finding” can be done through various means, such as using a map, following signs, or relying on GPS navigation systems.

  • For instance, a hiker might say, “Route-finding is crucial when exploring unfamiliar trails.”
  • In a discussion about city commuting, someone might mention, “I use a route-finding app to avoid traffic and find the fastest way to work.”
  • A traveler might ask, “What are some tips for route-finding in a foreign country?”

8. Satnav

This term is a shortened form of “satellite navigation” and refers to a system that uses signals from satellites to determine the precise location of a person or vehicle. “Satnav” is often used to describe GPS navigation devices or apps that provide real-time directions and other location-based services.

  • For example, a driver might say, “I always rely on my satnav to navigate through unfamiliar areas.”
  • When discussing the benefits of a particular GPS device, a user might mention, “This satnav has a large screen and clear voice instructions.”
  • A person might ask, “Which satnav app do you recommend for hiking?”

9. Dead reckoning

This term refers to the process of determining one’s current position based on a previously known position and the course and speed of movement. “Dead reckoning” is often used in situations where external aids, such as GPS or landmarks, are unavailable or unreliable, such as at sea or in remote areas.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “Dead reckoning is essential for navigation when there are no visible landmarks.”
  • In a discussion about survival skills, someone might mention, “Knowing how to do dead reckoning can help you find your way in the wilderness.”
  • A person might ask, “What are some techniques for accurate dead reckoning?”

10. Plotting

This term refers to the process of marking or drawing a route or course on a map or chart. “Plotting” is often done to plan a journey or to track progress during navigation. It involves identifying key points, measuring distances, and determining the best path to follow.

  • For example, a navigator might say, “I spent hours plotting our course on the nautical chart.”
  • When discussing a road trip, someone might mention, “I enjoy plotting all the stops and attractions along the way.”
  • A person might ask, “What tools or software can I use for plotting a hiking route?”

11. Charting

The process of creating a map or chart to navigate a specific area. “Charting” can also refer to the act of marking a course or plotting a route on a map.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “I spent hours charting our course for the voyage.”
  • A hiker might mention, “I always bring a compass and map for charting my way through the wilderness.”
  • In a conversation about travel planning, someone might ask, “Have you finished charting the itinerary for our road trip?”

12. Piloting

The act of navigating a vehicle or vessel, usually through manual control or by following a set of predetermined instructions. “Piloting” can also refer to the process of flying an aircraft.

  • For instance, a captain might say, “I’ll be piloting the ship through these treacherous waters.”
  • A driver might mention, “I’m piloting a bus full of tourists around the city.”
  • In a discussion about aviation, someone might ask, “What are the requirements for piloting a commercial airliner?”

13. Orienteering

A competitive sport or recreational activity that involves using a map and compass to navigate through unfamiliar terrain. “Orienteering” can also refer to the act of finding one’s way or determining direction using various navigational tools.

  • For example, an outdoor enthusiast might say, “I enjoy orienteering in the mountains to test my navigation skills.”
  • A scout might mention, “Orienteering is an essential skill we learn to navigate through the wilderness.”
  • In a conversation about outdoor activities, someone might ask, “Have you tried orienteering before? It’s a great way to challenge yourself.”

14. Bearings

A term used to describe one’s understanding or knowledge of their current location and the direction they need to travel. “Bearings” can also refer to the angles or directions used in navigation.

  • For instance, a hiker might say, “I lost my bearings in the dense forest and had to rely on my compass.”
  • A sailor might mention, “Knowing the wind direction is crucial for adjusting our bearings.”
  • In a discussion about getting lost, someone might ask, “How do you regain your bearings when you’re disoriented?”

15. Landmarking

The act of recognizing or using prominent features or landmarks to navigate and determine one’s location. “Landmarking” can also refer to the process of marking or identifying important landmarks on a map.

  • For example, a traveler might say, “I always rely on landmarking to find my way in a new city.”
  • A hiker might mention, “Landmarking is essential when there are no established trails in the wilderness.”
  • In a conversation about cartography, someone might ask, “What are the techniques for landmarking on a map?”

Naviguessing refers to the act of guessing or estimating the correct direction or route when navigating. It is often used when someone is unsure of the correct way to go and is relying on their instincts or best guess.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m not sure which way to turn, so I’ll just naviguess.”
  • In a conversation about getting lost, someone might say, “Naviguessing is a common occurrence when you’re in unfamiliar territory.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any tips for reducing naviguessing while driving in a new city?”

17. GPSing

GPSing is the act of using a GPS (Global Positioning System) device or app to navigate. It involves relying on the GPS technology to provide accurate location information and directions.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be GPSing my way to the destination.”
  • In a discussion about road trips, someone might ask, “What’s your preferred GPSing app?”
  • A person might recommend, “Make sure you have a fully charged GPS device before starting your hike.”

18. Waypointing

Waypointing refers to the practice of marking specific locations or points of interest along a route. These waypoints are used as reference points for navigation and can help guide someone along their intended path.

  • For example, in a hiking trip, someone might say, “Let’s waypoint the campsite and the summit.”
  • In a discussion about geocaching, someone might ask, “Do you have any tips for accurate waypointing?”
  • A person might suggest, “Use waypointing to create a custom route for your road trip.”

19. Heading out

Heading out is a phrase used to indicate the beginning of a journey or trip. It implies that someone is leaving their current location and starting their navigation towards a destination.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m heading out to the grocery store, do you need anything?”
  • In a conversation about vacation plans, someone might ask, “When are you heading out for your trip?”
  • A person might announce, “I’ll be heading out early tomorrow morning for the conference.”

Navi is a shortened form of the word “navigation” and is often used to refer to a navigation device or app. It is a slang term commonly used in casual conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll just follow the navi to get there.”
  • In a discussion about road trips, someone might ask, “Which navi do you prefer to use?”
  • A person might recommend, “Download a reliable navi app before your next trip.”

21. On course

When someone is “on course,” it means they are going in the right direction or following the intended path.

  • For example, a captain might say, “We’re on course to reach our destination on time.”
  • A hiker might say, “As long as we stay on course, we’ll reach the summit.”
  • A driver might say, “I missed my exit, but I’m back on course now.”

22. Off track

When someone is “off track,” it means they are not following the intended path or have deviated from the planned route.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “We need to get back on track with the lesson.”
  • A project manager might say, “We’re behind schedule and off track.”
  • A hiker might say, “I think we’re off track, we should turn around.”

23. Lost in space

When someone is “lost in space,” it means they are confused, disoriented, or have no idea where they are or where they’re going.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m lost in space, I have no idea how to get home.”
  • A traveler might say, “I took the wrong train and now I’m completely lost in space.”
  • A student might say, “I didn’t understand the lecture at all, I feel lost in space.”

24. Plot a course

When someone “plots a course,” it means they plan a specific route or path to follow.

  • For instance, a navigator might say, “Let’s plot a course to avoid the storm.”
  • A captain might say, “I’ve plotted a course that will take us directly to our destination.”
  • A driver might say, “I need to plot a course to find the nearest gas station.”

25. Chart a path

When someone “charts a path,” it means they create a plan or strategy to achieve a goal or reach a destination.

  • For example, a business owner might say, “We need to chart a path for success.”
  • A coach might say, “We’re going to chart a path to victory.”
  • A traveler might say, “I need to chart a path to visit all the major landmarks in the city.”

To navigate means to find one’s way or direct a course. It can refer to physically traveling from one place to another or metaphorically finding a path or solution.

  • For example, “I need to navigate through the city to find the restaurant.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “Let’s navigate through the different perspectives.”
  • A sailor might use the term to describe their ability to navigate the open seas.
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27. Steer

To steer means to guide or control the direction of movement. It can refer to physically manipulating a steering mechanism or metaphorically influencing the course of an action or decision.

  • For instance, “He steered the car smoothly around the curve.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need someone to steer the team in the right direction.”
  • A parent might use the term to describe guiding their child’s behavior.

28. Pilot

To pilot means to fly or navigate a vehicle, typically an aircraft or ship. It can also refer to taking control or leading a project or initiative.

  • For example, “He piloted the plane through turbulent weather.”
  • In a discussion about a new business venture, someone might say, “We need someone to pilot this project.”
  • A captain might use the term to describe their role in navigating a ship.

29. Map out

To map out means to plan or chart a course of action. It can refer to creating a physical map or metaphorically outlining the steps or details of a plan.

  • For instance, “She mapped out the route for the road trip.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Let’s map out the timeline and milestones.”
  • A teacher might use the term to describe planning out the curriculum for the school year.

30. Direct

To direct means to guide or lead someone or something in a particular direction. It can refer to giving instructions or providing guidance.

  • For example, “He directed the group to turn left at the next intersection.”
  • In a discussion about a play, someone might say, “The director will direct the actors in their performances.”
  • A manager might use the term to describe giving instructions to their team.

31. Guide

To show or direct the way for someone. “Guide” can refer to a person who leads or gives advice, or it can be used as a verb to describe the act of leading or directing.

  • For example, a tour guide might say, “I will guide you through this historic city.”
  • During a hiking trip, someone might ask, “Can you guide us to the summit?”
  • A person giving directions might say, “I can guide you to the nearest gas station.”

32. Route

The course or way taken in getting from one place to another. “Route” can refer to a specific path or a planned course of travel.

  • For instance, a GPS device might say, “Turn left to stay on the route.”
  • A person discussing travel plans might say, “We’re taking the scenic route to our destination.”
  • A delivery driver might ask, “What’s the fastest route to this address?”

33. Wayfind

To find one’s way or determine a course of action. “Wayfind” can be used as a verb to describe the act of navigating or finding a path.

  • For example, a person lost in a city might ask, “Can you help me wayfind my way back to the hotel?”
  • A hiker might say, “I use a compass to wayfind through the wilderness.”
  • A sailor might explain, “Wayfinding is an essential skill for navigating the open seas.”

34. Set sail

To embark on a voyage or start a journey, especially by boat. “Set sail” is often used metaphorically to mean starting a new adventure or endeavor.

  • For instance, a captain might say, “We’re ready to set sail to the next port.”
  • A person starting a new job might say, “I’m excited to set sail on this new career path.”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “Just set sail on a backpacking trip around the world.”

To move or proceed in a way that is favorable or aligned with one’s goals or desired outcome. “Head in the right direction” is a figurative phrase that means making progress or taking steps towards success.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Keep practicing and you’ll head in the right direction.”
  • A person working on personal growth might say, “I’m taking small steps every day to head in the right direction.”
  • A business owner might say, “Our sales are increasing, which shows we’re heading in the right direction.”

36. Point the way

This phrase means to provide guidance or show someone the correct path to take. It is often used when someone is unsure of where to go and needs assistance.

  • For example, if someone asks, “How do I get to the nearest gas station?”, you can respond, “Just keep going straight on this road and I’ll point the way when we get closer.”
  • In a hiking group, someone might say, “I’ve been here before, so I’ll point the way.”
  • If someone is lost in a city, they might ask a local, “Excuse me, can you point the way to the nearest subway station?”

37. Find your bearings

This phrase means to become familiar with your surroundings or to determine your current location in relation to other landmarks or points of reference.

  • For instance, if someone is in a new city and feels disoriented, they might say, “I need a moment to find my bearings.”
  • In an outdoor adventure, a guide might instruct participants, “Take a moment to find your bearings before we continue.”
  • If someone is lost in a large building, they might ask, “Can you help me find my bearings? I can’t seem to locate the exit.”

38. Follow the stars

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying to use the stars as a guide or to rely on something reliable and constant for direction.

  • For example, in a camping trip, someone might say, “We can follow the stars to find our way back to the campsite.”
  • In a figurative sense, a mentor might advise a student, “Follow the stars of your passions and dreams to guide your career path.”
  • If someone is lost in life, they might reflect, “I need to find my purpose and follow the stars to a brighter future.”

39. Blaze a trail

This phrase means to be the first to go through an unexplored or difficult area, leaving a trail for others to follow. It can also be used metaphorically to describe being a pioneer or innovator in a certain field.

  • For instance, in a hiking expedition, someone might say, “Let’s blaze a trail through this dense forest.”
  • In a technological context, a company might be praised for “blazing a trail in artificial intelligence research.”
  • If someone is starting a new business, they might say, “I want to blaze a trail in the industry and disrupt the status quo.”

40. Get on track

This phrase means to refocus or realign oneself with a goal or plan of action. It is often used when someone has lost their way or become distracted.

  • For example, if someone is procrastinating, a friend might say, “You need to get on track and start working on your project.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage their team, “We had a rough start, but let’s get on track and turn this game around.”
  • If someone is feeling lost in life, they might seek guidance and say, “I need to get on track and figure out my next steps.”

41. Go off the grid

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that completely disappears or becomes untraceable, often in the context of navigation or communication.

  • For example, “After the hurricane, the entire town went off the grid and it took weeks to restore power.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “We need to go off the grid to avoid detection.”
  • A traveler might decide to go off the grid and not use any technology or GPS during their trip.
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42. Take the wheel

This phrase is used to describe someone taking control or assuming responsibility, often in the context of driving or navigation.

  • For instance, “I’m tired, do you want to take the wheel for the rest of the journey?”
  • In a team project, a leader might say, “It’s time for someone else to take the wheel and lead the group.”
  • A parent might tell their teenager, “You need to prove you’re responsible before I let you take the wheel of the car.”

43. Stay on course

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue moving in the right direction, often in the context of navigation or achieving a goal.

  • For example, “We’re facing challenges, but we need to stay on course and not give up.”
  • In a sailing race, a coach might shout, “Stay on course and don’t let the wind distract you!”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Life will throw you off course, but it’s important to stay focused on your goals.”

44. Hit the road

This phrase is used to describe the act of starting a journey or leaving a place, often in the context of navigation or travel.

  • For instance, “It’s time to hit the road and start our road trip.”
  • In a farewell party, someone might say, “It’s been great, but I have to hit the road and head home.”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “Just hit the road for my solo adventure!”

45. Cruise

This word is used to describe traveling smoothly and effortlessly, often in the context of navigation or driving.

  • For example, “We’re just going to cruise down the highway and enjoy the scenery.”
  • In a car commercial, a voiceover might say, “Experience the thrill of cruising in our luxury vehicle.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you want to go for a cruise along the coast?”

46. Trek

A long and arduous journey, typically on foot or in a remote and rugged area. “Trek” is often used to describe a challenging adventure or expedition.

  • For example, “We embarked on a trek through the Himalayas.”
  • A hiker might say, “I’m planning a trek to Machu Picchu.”
  • Someone might describe their experience as, “It was a tough trek, but the incredible views made it worth it.”

47. Voyage

A long journey, especially by sea or in space. “Voyage” often implies a sense of exploration or discovery.

  • For instance, “We set sail on a voyage around the world.”
  • A space enthusiast might say, “The Voyager spacecraft embarked on a historic voyage through the outer solar system.”
  • Someone might describe their experience as, “It was an unforgettable voyage across the Atlantic Ocean.”

48. Expedition

A journey or voyage undertaken for a specific purpose, such as scientific research or exploration. An “expedition” often involves a team of individuals working together towards a common goal.

  • For example, “The team went on an expedition to study wildlife in the Amazon rainforest.”
  • An archaeologist might say, “Our expedition uncovered ancient ruins in Egypt.”
  • Someone might describe their experience as, “It was a challenging expedition to reach the summit of Mount Everest.”

49. Steer the ship

To take control and direct the course of a ship or journey. “Steer the ship” is a metaphorical phrase often used to mean taking charge or leading a group.

  • For instance, “He steered the ship towards success with his strong leadership.”
  • A team manager might say, “I need someone to step up and steer the ship during this challenging project.”
  • Someone might describe their role as, “I’m here to steer the ship and make sure we stay on track.”

50. Pilot the journey

To guide or control the course of a journey or expedition. “Pilot the journey” is a metaphorical phrase often used to mean leading or guiding a group through unfamiliar territory.

  • For example, “She piloted the journey through the treacherous mountain pass.”
  • A tour guide might say, “I’ll pilot the journey and show you all the best sights.”
  • Someone might describe their role as, “I’m here to pilot the journey and make sure we reach our destination safely.”

51. Find your way

This phrase means to locate or determine the correct route or direction to a destination.

  • For example, if someone is lost, they might say, “I need to find my way back home.”
  • In a hiking trip, a group leader might say, “Let’s find our way to the summit.”
  • A traveler in a foreign city might ask a local, “Can you help me find my way to the nearest train station?”

52. Map out the route

This expression refers to creating a detailed plan or strategy for a specific route or journey.

  • For instance, a road trip planner might say, “I need to map out the route with all the pit stops.”
  • In a business meeting, a project manager might suggest, “Let’s map out the route to achieve our goals.”
  • A tour guide might explain, “We have already mapped out the route for the city tour.”

53. Guide the way

This phrase means to show or lead someone in the right direction or along a specific route.

  • For example, a tour guide might say, “I will guide the way through the museum.”
  • During a hiking trip, the most experienced person might be asked to guide the way.
  • A teacher might instruct a student, “I will guide the way, and you follow my lead.”

54. Sail the seas

This expression is a metaphorical way of referring to traveling or exploring the ocean.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “I’ve always wanted to sail the seas and explore different countries.”
  • In a book about maritime adventures, the author might write, “The protagonist embarks on a journey to sail the seas and discover hidden treasures.”
  • A person dreaming of a vacation might say, “One day, I will sail the seas and visit exotic islands.”

55. Direct the route

This phrase means to take charge or have authority over the course or direction of a journey.

  • For example, a captain might say, “I will direct the route of the ship to avoid any obstacles.”
  • In a road trip, the driver might ask for input but ultimately direct the route.
  • A project manager might instruct the team, “I will direct the route of this project to ensure its success.”

This phrase means to physically drive or travel on a road or route.

  • For example, “We need to navigate the road carefully in order to avoid traffic.”
  • A driver might say, “I’m confident in my ability to navigate the road in any weather conditions.”
  • Someone giving directions might say, “Once you navigate the road, take the second exit on the right.”

57. Chart the course

This phrase means to carefully plan or map out a specific route or course.

  • For instance, “Before setting off on a road trip, it’s important to chart the course.”
  • A navigator might say, “Let’s chart the course and make sure we avoid any toll roads.”
  • Someone discussing a hiking trip might mention, “I spent hours charting the course to make sure we hit all the scenic spots.”

58. Plot the journey

This phrase means to carefully plan or map out the entire journey or trip.

  • For example, “Before embarking on a long road trip, it’s essential to plot the journey.”
  • A traveler might say, “I’ve already plotted the journey and booked accommodations along the way.”
  • Someone discussing a backpacking adventure might mention, “We spent months plotting the journey and researching the best trails.”

59. Steer the course

This phrase means to guide or control the direction or path of travel.

  • For instance, “The captain must steer the course of the ship to avoid any obstacles.”
  • A driver might say, “It’s important to stay focused and steer the course, especially in heavy traffic.”
  • Someone discussing a sailing trip might mention, “I had to steer the course carefully to navigate through rough waters.”

60. Pilot the course

This phrase means to take charge and lead the way in navigating a specific course or route.

  • For example, “The experienced pilot will pilot the course through the treacherous mountain pass.”
  • A captain might say, “I’ll pilot the course and ensure a smooth journey for all passengers.”
  • Someone discussing a hiking expedition might mention, “We need an experienced guide to pilot the course and navigate the challenging terrain.”

61. Direct the path

This phrase means to show or indicate the correct route or direction to take.

  • For example, “Can you direct the path to the nearest gas station?”
  • A tour guide might say, “I will direct the path and take you to all the major landmarks.”
  • In a hiking group, someone might ask, “Who wants to direct the path for today’s trail?”

This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe successfully managing or overcoming difficulties.

  • For instance, “She had to navigate the waters of a difficult negotiation.”
  • A business executive might say, “Navigating the waters of a competitive market requires strategic planning.”
  • In a team project, someone might comment, “We need someone with strong leadership skills to navigate the waters and keep us on track.”

63. Chart the path

This phrase means to carefully outline or map out a specific plan or strategy.

  • For example, “The project manager will chart the path for the team to follow.”
  • A teacher might say, “Let’s chart the path for your academic goals for the semester.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might suggest, “We need to chart the path to increase our sales and revenue.”

64. Plot the route

This phrase refers to the act of mapping out or planning the exact path or route to take.

  • For instance, “Before starting the road trip, they plotted the route on a map.”
  • A pilot might say, “I need to plot the route for our flight to ensure a smooth journey.”
  • In a hiking group, someone might ask, “Who wants to plot the route for today’s trail?”

65. Steer the journey

This phrase means to direct or guide the progress or development of a journey or endeavor.

  • For example, “He was chosen to steer the journey towards success.”
  • A team leader might say, “I will steer the journey and make sure we reach our goals.”
  • In a group project, someone might comment, “We need someone with strong leadership skills to steer the journey and keep us on track.”

66. Pilot the path

This phrase is used to describe the act of taking charge and guiding others in a specific direction or route. It implies being responsible for ensuring a successful journey.

  • For example, during a hiking trip, someone might say, “I’ll pilot the path and make sure we don’t get lost.”
  • In a team setting, a leader might say, “I will pilot the path and show you the most efficient way to complete the project.”
  • A tour guide might announce, “I’ll be piloting the path for our sightseeing adventure today.”

67. Set the course

This phrase means to establish the desired route or trajectory for a journey or project. It implies taking control and making decisions regarding the path to be followed.

  • For instance, a captain on a ship might say, “I will set the course for our voyage.”
  • In a business context, a manager might state, “Let’s set the course for our company’s future success.”
  • A teacher might instruct students, “We will set the course for our learning journey by establishing clear goals.”

68. Find the route

This phrase refers to the act of locating or identifying the correct path or route to a desired destination. It implies the need to explore and search for the best way to reach a specific location.

  • For example, a hiker might say, “We need to find the route to the summit.”
  • In a road trip, a driver might ask, “Can you help me find the route to the nearest gas station?”
  • A traveler might consult a map and say, “I’m trying to find the route that avoids toll roads.”