Top 28 Slang For Drinking Alcohol – Meaning & Usage

Whether you’re getting ready for a night out with friends or just looking to unwind after a long day, we’ve got you covered with our list of the top slang words for drinking alcohol. From classic terms to trendy phrases, we’ve compiled a comprehensive guide that will have you speaking the language of the party scene in no time. So grab a drink, sit back, and let’s dive into the world of alcohol slang together. Cheers!

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1. Booze

This term is a general slang for any type of alcoholic drink. It can refer to beer, wine, spirits, or any other form of alcohol.

  • For example, “Let’s grab some booze and have a party!”
  • A person might say, “I need a drink. Where can I find some good booze in this town?”
  • In a conversation about cocktails, someone might ask, “What’s your favorite type of booze to mix with?”

2. Brews

This slang term specifically refers to beers or brewed beverages. It can be used to describe a single beer or a collection of different types of beers.

  • For instance, “Let’s go to the bar and grab some brews.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in the mood for some craft brews tonight.”
  • When discussing different beer styles, someone might ask, “What are your favorite brews?”

3. Hooch

This term is often used to describe homemade or illicitly produced alcohol. It can also refer to any strong or inferior quality alcoholic beverage.

  • For example, “During Prohibition, people made their own hooch to get their fix.”
  • A person might say, “I found this bottle of hooch in my grandfather’s basement. Wonder how it tastes.”
  • When referring to a particularly strong drink, someone might comment, “That moonshine is some potent hooch!”

4. Sauce

This slang term is a general reference to any type of alcoholic drink, but it is often used to specifically describe liquor or hard spirits.

  • For instance, “I had a few too many sauces last night and now I have a hangover.”
  • A person might say, “I need a shot of sauce to warm me up.”
  • In a discussion about cocktails, someone might ask, “What’s your favorite sauce to mix with?”

5. Juice

This slang term is often used to refer to any type of alcoholic drink, but it is commonly associated with fruity or mixed drinks that contain juice as an ingredient.

  • For example, “Let’s go to the beach and enjoy some refreshing juices.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer cocktails with a lot of juice in them.”
  • When discussing different cocktail recipes, someone might ask, “What’s your favorite juice to use in a cocktail?”

6. Sip on

This phrase refers to drinking alcohol slowly and in small amounts. It implies a relaxed and leisurely drinking experience.

  • For example, “I like to sip on a glass of wine while watching a movie.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer to sip on a cocktail rather than chugging it.”
  • Another might comment, “It’s nice to sip on a cold beer on a hot summer day.”

7. Tipple

This term is a playful and informal way to refer to drinking alcohol. It can be used to describe any type of alcoholic beverage.

  • For instance, “Let’s go out and have a tipple tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy a tipple of whiskey after a long day.”
  • Another might comment, “I like to have a tipple of champagne to celebrate special occasions.”

8. Guzzle

This slang word describes drinking alcohol quickly and in large amounts. It implies a less refined and more excessive drinking style.

  • For example, “He guzzled down a whole bottle of beer in one go.”
  • A person might say, “I guzzle cocktails at parties to get the party started.”
  • Another might comment, “I don’t like to guzzle alcohol because it makes me feel sick.”

9. Get sloshed

This phrase means to become heavily intoxicated or drunk from drinking alcohol. It suggests a state of being completely under the influence of alcohol.

  • For instance, “We went to the bar and got completely sloshed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m planning to get sloshed at the party tonight.”
  • Another might comment, “I regret getting sloshed last night, I had a terrible hangover.”

10. Knock back

This slang phrase means to consume a drink quickly and in a single motion. It implies a swift and efficient way of drinking alcohol.

  • For example, “He knocked back a shot of tequila without hesitation.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s knock back a few beers before the game.”
  • Another might comment, “I always knock back a glass of whiskey before giving a presentation to calm my nerves.”

11. Have a few

This phrase is used to casually refer to drinking a small amount of alcohol. It implies a relaxed and moderate level of drinking.

  • For example, “Let’s meet up at the bar and have a few drinks.”
  • A person might say, “I’m just going to have a few beers and then head home.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might ask, “Would you like to have a few cocktails with us?”

12. Tie one on

This phrase is used to describe drinking alcohol in large quantities or getting drunk. It implies a more intense and excessive level of drinking.

  • For instance, “He really tied one on at the party last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m planning to tie one on and celebrate my birthday in style.”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might joke, “I don’t always tie one on, but when I do, I regret it the next day.”

13. Get buzzed

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of being slightly intoxicated or having a mild buzz from drinking alcohol. It implies a moderate level of drinking.

  • For example, “I had a few cocktails and started to get buzzed.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy having a couple of drinks and getting a little buzzed.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Are you feeling buzzed yet?”

14. Get plastered

This phrase is used to describe getting heavily intoxicated or drunk. It implies a state of being completely intoxicated.

  • For instance, “He got completely plastered at the bachelor party.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t remember anything from last night, I was completely plastered.”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might joke, “I’m not getting plastered tonight, I’m getting wall-papered!”

15. Get hammered

This phrase is used to describe getting extremely intoxicated or drunk. It implies a state of being heavily and intensely under the influence of alcohol.

  • For example, “We got hammered at the concert and had a great time.”
  • A person might say, “I’m planning to get hammered and forget about all my problems.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you want to get hammered and dance the night away?”

16. Have a nightcap

Having a nightcap is a way to wind down at the end of the day. It typically refers to having a small drink, such as a glass of wine or a cocktail, before going to sleep.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I like to have a nightcap to relax.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t sleep without having a nightcap first.”
  • In a conversation about nighttime routines, one person might mention, “I always read a book and have a nightcap before bed.”

17. Drink like a fish

To “drink like a fish” means to consume a large amount of alcohol, often to the point of excess or intoxication. The phrase suggests that someone’s drinking habits resemble those of a fish, which is known to constantly drink water to survive.

  • For instance, “He drank like a fish at the party and ended up passed out on the couch.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s partying habits, one might say, “She can really drink like a fish.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “You’re drinking like a fish tonight!”

18. Party like there’s no tomorrow

To “party like there’s no tomorrow” means to have a wild and uninhibited celebration, ignoring any potential negative consequences or responsibilities. It suggests living in the moment and enjoying oneself to the fullest.

  • For example, “We’re going to party like there’s no tomorrow on our vacation.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s birthday plans, one might suggest, “Let’s go out and party like there’s no tomorrow!”
  • A person might say, “I just got a promotion, so I’m going to party like there’s no tomorrow.”

19. Bend the elbow

To “bend the elbow” is a slang phrase that means to drink alcohol, particularly beer. The phrase refers to the action of lifting one’s arm and bending the elbow to bring a drink to one’s mouth.

  • For instance, “After work, I like to bend the elbow with my coworkers at the local pub.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s drinking habits, one might ask, “How often do you bend the elbow?”
  • A friend might say, “I’m in the mood to bend the elbow tonight. Let’s go out for a drink!”

20. Have a pint

To “have a pint” means to drink a pint of beer. The phrase is commonly used in British English and is associated with socializing and enjoying a drink with friends.

  • For example, “Let’s meet at the pub and have a pint after work.”
  • In a conversation about favorite drinks, one might say, “I love to have a pint of Guinness.”
  • A person might suggest, “Instead of going out, let’s stay in and have a pint.”

21. Have a shot

This phrase is used to indicate taking a small amount of alcohol, typically in the form of a shot glass. It can refer to any type of alcoholic beverage that is consumed quickly in one gulp.

  • For example, “Let’s have a shot of tequila to celebrate!”
  • In a bar setting, someone might say, “I’ll have a shot of whiskey, please.”
  • During a night out, a friend might encourage you by saying, “Come on, have a shot with us!”

22. Have a cocktail

This phrase is used to indicate enjoying a mixed drink that contains alcohol. Cocktails often consist of a combination of spirits, mixers, and garnishes, and are typically served in a glass.

  • For instance, “I’ll have a cocktail with vodka and cranberry juice.”
  • At a party, someone might ask, “What’s your favorite cocktail?”
  • When ordering at a bar, you could say, “I’ll have a cocktail with rum and pineapple juice.”

23. Have a nip

This phrase is used to indicate taking a small amount of alcohol, typically in a casual or informal setting. It can refer to any type of alcoholic beverage that is consumed in a small quantity.

  • For example, “I’ll just have a nip of whiskey to warm up.”
  • When sharing a bottle of wine, someone might say, “Would you like a nip?”
  • In a social gathering, a friend might ask, “Who wants a nip of this new craft beer?”

24. Sip on the sauce

This phrase is used to indicate drinking alcohol slowly and steadily, savoring the flavors and enjoying the experience. “Sip” refers to taking small, gentle drinks, while “sauce” is a slang term for alcohol.

  • For instance, “I like to sit back and sip on the sauce after a long day.”
  • During a wine tasting, someone might say, “Take your time and sip on the sauce to fully appreciate the flavors.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might mention, “I like to relax on weekends and sip on the sauce while watching a movie.”

25. Have a few cold ones

This phrase is used to indicate drinking a few cold alcoholic beverages, typically in a social or relaxed setting. “Cold ones” refers to chilled drinks, usually in cans or bottles.

  • For example, “Let’s grab a few cold ones and hang out by the beach.”
  • When inviting friends over, someone might say, “Come over and we’ll have a few cold ones.”
  • During a barbecue, a person might ask, “Who wants a few cold ones to go with the food?”

26. Crack open a cold one

This phrase is used to indicate the action of opening a cold alcoholic beverage, typically a beer. It is often used in a casual and lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “Let’s crack open a cold one and relax by the pool.”
  • A group of friends might say, “Cracking open a cold one after a long day is the best way to unwind.”
  • During a barbecue, someone might ask, “Who’s ready to crack open a cold one?”

27. Down the hatch

This phrase is used to encourage someone to quickly consume their drink, usually an alcoholic one. It implies the action of swallowing the drink.

  • For instance, “Cheers! Down the hatch!”
  • When toasting, someone might say, “Here’s to a great night. Down the hatch!”
  • In a drinking game, a participant might be told, “Take your shot and down the hatch!”

28. Imbibe

This word is a formal term that means to consume or drink alcohol. It is often used in a more sophisticated or intellectual context.

  • For example, “He enjoys imbibing fine wines from around the world.”
  • During a wine tasting event, someone might say, “Feel free to imbibe and savor the flavors.”
  • In a conversation about different alcoholic beverages, a person might ask, “What types of spirits do you like to imbibe?”
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