Top 40 Slang For Drive – Meaning & Usage

Rev up your engines and get ready to hit the road with our list of the coolest slang for drive. From cruising down the highway to taking a joyride, we’ve got you covered with all the trendy terms to elevate your driving game. Buckle up and join us as we navigate through the world of driving with style and flair!

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1. Cruise

When someone says they are going to “cruise,” it means they are going to drive around aimlessly or enjoy a leisurely drive. This term is often used to describe driving without a specific destination in mind.

  • For example, “Let’s go for a cruise along the coast and enjoy the scenic views.”
  • Someone might ask, “Wanna go for a cruise and grab some ice cream?”
  • A friend might suggest, “We should go for a late-night cruise and listen to some music.”

2. Roll

When someone says they are going to “roll,” it means they are going to drive or move forward. This term is often used to describe the act of driving in a casual or relaxed manner.

  • For instance, “I’m gonna roll to the store real quick to grab some snacks.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s roll out and hit up that new restaurant in town.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you give me a lift? I need to roll to the train station.”

3. Whip

When someone says they are going to “whip,” it means they are going to drive or operate a vehicle. This term is often used to emphasize the skill or style in which someone drives.

  • For example, “He knows how to whip that sports car around the track.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll whip us to the party in my new ride.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you teach me how to whip a manual transmission?”

4. Ride

When someone says they are going for a “ride,” it means they are going to drive or travel in a vehicle. This term is often used to describe the act of being a passenger in a vehicle.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a ride home after work.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can I catch a ride with you to the concert?”
  • Someone might say, “I prefer taking the train, but sometimes a ride in a car is more convenient.”

5. Motor

When someone says they are going to “motor,” it means they are going to drive or travel by motor vehicle. This term is often used to describe the act of driving with purpose or determination.

  • For example, “I need to motor to the airport to catch my flight.”
  • A friend might say, “We’ll motor through the night to reach our destination.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have enough gas to motor all the way to the next town?”

6. Spin

To “spin” in the context of driving refers to driving fast or performing a quick maneuver, such as spinning the car around in a circle or executing a sharp turn. It can also mean to show off one’s driving skills.

  • For example, “He spun his car around the corner, leaving a cloud of smoke behind.”
  • In a discussion about car racing, someone might say, “He’s known for his ability to spin his car around tight corners.”
  • A person might brag, “I can spin my car 360 degrees without losing control.”

7. Burn rubber

To “burn rubber” means to accelerate rapidly, causing the tires to lose traction and leave skid marks on the road. It is often used to describe a fast and aggressive start from a stationary position.

  • For instance, “He burned rubber as he took off from the stop sign.”
  • In a conversation about drag racing, someone might say, “He burned rubber off the starting line, gaining an early lead.”
  • A person might boast, “I can burn rubber for several feet before my tires grip the road.”

8. Hit the road

To “hit the road” means to begin a journey or start driving. It is a common phrase used to signify the start of a trip or a departure from a specific location.

  • For example, “We packed our bags and hit the road early in the morning.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “Let’s hit the road and explore new destinations.”
  • A person might announce, “I’m done with work for the day, time to hit the road and head home.”

9. Take a spin

To “take a spin” means to go for a short drive or ride, typically for leisure or enjoyment. It can also refer to test driving a vehicle or trying out a new mode of transportation.

  • For instance, “Let’s take a spin around the neighborhood and enjoy the fresh air.”
  • In a conversation about trying out a new car, someone might say, “I’m going to the dealership to take a spin in that sports car.”
  • A person might suggest, “After dinner, let’s take a spin along the coast and enjoy the sunset.”

10. Road trip

A “road trip” refers to a journey or excursion taken by car, typically for a longer distance. It often involves multiple stops and can be a fun and adventurous way to explore different places.

  • For example, “We’re going on a road trip across the country, visiting various national parks.”
  • In a discussion about travel experiences, someone might say, “I had the best time on my road trip along the scenic coastal route.”
  • A person might plan, “Let’s gather some friends and go on a road trip to the mountains next weekend.”

11. Drive off

“I saw the police coming, so I had to drive off before they could catch me.” – “When the rain started pouring, we decided to drive off and find shelter.” – “He got into an argument with his boss and just drove off in a fit of anger.”

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12. Drive through

“I’m too lazy to cook, let’s just drive through McDonald’s for dinner.” – “I was in a rush, so I decided to drive through the bank instead of going inside.” – “She loves getting coffee, so she always makes sure to drive through Starbucks on her way to work.”

13. Drive-by

“There was a drive-by shooting last night in our neighborhood, it’s getting really dangerous.” – “The gang members drove by and threw a brick through the window as a drive-by act of vandalism.” – “The police are investigating a drive-by incident that occurred outside the club.”

14. Roam

“We decided to take a road trip and just roam around the countryside.” – “During my gap year, I roamed through Europe, exploring different cities and cultures.” – “He loves the freedom of roaming on his motorcycle, feeling the wind in his hair.”

15. Zip around

“I need to run some errands, so I’ll zip around town in my car.” – “The kids are so hyper, they’ve been zipping around the neighborhood on their bikes all day.” – “He zips around the track in his sports car, showing off his driving skills.”

16. Motor around

This phrase is often used to describe driving without a specific destination or purpose.

  • For example, “Let’s just motor around town and see where we end up.”
  • A person might say, “I love to motor around on the weekends and explore new neighborhoods.”
  • Another might use it to describe a leisurely drive, saying, “I enjoy motor around the countryside and taking in the scenery.”

17. Put the pedal to the metal

This phrase is used to describe driving fast or pushing the gas pedal to the maximum.

  • For instance, “I had to put the pedal to the metal to make it to the meeting on time.”
  • A person might say, “If you want to beat the traffic, put the pedal to the metal.”
  • Another might use it to describe a thrilling drive, saying, “I love the adrenaline rush of putting the pedal to the metal on an open highway.”

18. Step on it

This phrase is used to encourage someone to drive faster or accelerate quickly.

  • For example, “We’re running late, step on it!”
  • A person might say, “If you want to make it to the movie on time, step on it.”
  • Another might use it to express urgency, saying, “Step on it, we need to get to the hospital quickly!”

19. Floor it

This phrase is used to describe pushing the gas pedal to the maximum and driving at full speed.

  • For instance, “When the light turns green, floor it!”
  • A person might say, “I love the feeling of adrenaline when I floor it on an empty road.”
  • Another might use it to describe a thrilling drive, saying, “I floored it and raced down the highway.”

20. Punch it

This phrase is used to describe accelerating quickly and driving aggressively.

  • For example, “When the race started, he punched it and took the lead.”
  • A person might say, “If you want to merge into traffic, punch it and find a gap.”
  • Another might use it to describe a daring maneuver, saying, “I punched it and swerved to avoid a collision.”

21. Gun it

To “gun it” means to accelerate quickly or forcefully. It often implies driving at high speeds.

  • For example, “When the light turned green, he gunned it and left everyone else behind.”
  • A person might say, “I had to gun it to merge onto the highway.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t gun it around sharp turns, you’ll lose control.”

22. Mash the gas

To “mash the gas” means to press the accelerator pedal forcefully, usually with the intention of driving at high speeds.

  • For instance, “He mashed the gas and zoomed off.”
  • A person might say, “If you want to win the race, you’ve got to mash the gas.”
  • Another might explain, “Mashing the gas can give you a sudden burst of speed.”

23. Rev up

To “rev up” means to increase the engine speed, typically by pressing the accelerator pedal.

  • For example, “He revved up the engine before taking off.”
  • A person might say, “Revving up the engine can make your car sound more powerful.”
  • Another might advise, “Rev up the engine before attempting to climb a steep hill.”

24. Go full throttle

To “go full throttle” means to drive at maximum speed or effort, often with a sense of urgency or determination.

  • For instance, “He went full throttle to catch up to the lead car.”
  • A person might say, “When you’re racing, you have to go full throttle to win.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Go full throttle and leave everyone else in the dust!”

25. Put the hammer down

To “put the hammer down” means to drive at high speed, often with a sense of excitement or urgency.

  • For example, “He put the hammer down and raced down the highway.”
  • A person might say, “When you’re running late, it’s time to put the hammer down.”
  • Another might caution, “Be careful when putting the hammer down, speeding can be dangerous.”

26. Go pedal to the metal

This phrase is used to encourage someone to drive as fast as possible. It implies pushing the gas pedal all the way to the floor.

  • For example, a friend might say, “We’re running late, go pedal to the metal!”
  • In a car race, a commentator might exclaim, “He’s going pedal to the metal to catch up!”
  • A driver might boast, “I love the feeling of going pedal to the metal on an open highway!”

27. Go flat out

This phrase is used to describe driving at the highest possible speed or putting in maximum effort.

  • For instance, a coach might say to a race car driver, “Go flat out and don’t hold back!”
  • In a conversation about a long road trip, someone might say, “We drove flat out to reach our destination on time.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me a ride? I need to get there flat out!”

28. Go all out

This phrase is used to encourage someone to drive with complete dedication and effort. It can also be used to describe driving at high speeds or taking risks.

  • For example, a coach might say to a race car driver, “Go all out and give it your best!”
  • In a conversation about a thrilling car chase scene in a movie, someone might say, “The driver went all out to escape the police.”
  • A friend might comment, “I love driving on empty roads and going all out!”

29. Go all in

This phrase is often used in the context of racing or competitive driving to describe giving everything and not holding back.

  • For instance, a race car driver might say, “I’m going all in for the win!”
  • In a conversation about a high-speed pursuit, someone might say, “The driver went all in to escape capture.”
  • A friend might comment, “I admire people who go all in and take risks while driving.”

30. Go balls to the wall

This phrase is used to describe driving at the highest possible speed or putting in maximum effort. It implies pushing the limits and giving it everything.

  • For example, a race car driver might say, “I’m going balls to the wall for this race!”
  • In a conversation about a thrilling car chase scene in a movie, someone might say, “The driver went balls to the wall to escape the bad guys.”
  • A friend might comment, “I love the feeling of going balls to the wall on an open road!”

31. Go like the wind

This phrase means to drive at a very high speed. It implies that the person is driving so fast that it feels like they are moving with the wind.

  • For example, “He was late for his meeting, so he went like the wind to get there on time.”
  • Someone might say, “I love driving on the open road and going like the wind.”
  • A racing enthusiast might exclaim, “The car went like the wind around the track!”

32. Go like stink

This phrase means to drive at a very high speed. It suggests that the person is driving so fast that it feels like they are moving with tremendous speed, like something that stinks.

  • For instance, “He was in a hurry, so he went like stink to get to the airport.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “This sports car can go like stink!”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I love the adrenaline rush of going like stink on the highway!”

33. Haul

This term means to drive quickly and aggressively. It implies that the person is moving with great force and determination.

  • For example, “He hauled down the highway to catch up with the speeding car.”
  • A truck driver might say, “I have to haul across the country to make my delivery on time.”
  • A friend might comment, “You really hauled on that last turn!”

34. Push the pedal

This phrase means to press the accelerator pedal in a vehicle in order to drive at a high speed. It suggests that the person is using force to make the vehicle go faster.

  • For instance, “He pushed the pedal and zoomed past the other cars on the highway.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “If you want to go fast, you have to push the pedal.”
  • Someone might comment, “I love the feeling of pushing the pedal and feeling the acceleration!”

35. Take a ride

This phrase means to go for a drive in a vehicle. It suggests that the person is taking a leisurely or enjoyable drive.

  • For example, “Let’s take a ride and enjoy the beautiful scenery.”
  • A friend might ask, “Wanna take a ride and grab some ice cream?”
  • Someone might say, “I love taking a ride on a sunny day with the windows down!”

36. Hit the highway

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is going on a long drive or road trip, typically on a highway or major road.

  • For example, “We’re going to hit the highway and head to the beach for the weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I love to hit the highway and explore new places.”
  • Someone planning a trip might ask, “Who wants to hit the highway with me and visit some national parks?”

37. Take a cruise

This phrase is used to describe a relaxed and enjoyable drive, often without a specific destination in mind.

  • For instance, “Let’s take a cruise along the coast and enjoy the scenery.”
  • Someone might say, “I like to take a cruise on Sunday afternoons to clear my mind.”
  • A person might suggest, “Instead of staying in, let’s take a cruise and grab some ice cream.”

38. Hit the freeway

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is getting on a freeway or highway to start their journey.

  • For example, “We need to hit the freeway to make it to the concert on time.”
  • A person might say, “I always hit the freeway when I need to get somewhere quickly.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the fastest way to hit the freeway from here?”

39. Take a road trip

This phrase is used to describe a trip or journey taken by car, often for pleasure or exploration.

  • For instance, “Let’s take a road trip to visit all the national parks in the state.”
  • A person might say, “I love taking road trips and discovering new places.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Instead of flying, let’s take a road trip and enjoy the scenic route.”

40. Hit the open road

This phrase is used to describe the act of embarking on a long drive, often with a sense of freedom and adventure.

  • For example, “I just want to hit the open road and see where it takes me.”
  • A person might say, “Whenever I need to clear my mind, I hit the open road and let the wind blow through my hair.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Let’s hit the open road and escape the city for a while.”