Top 29 Slang For Internalize – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing our thoughts and feelings, sometimes we tend to keep it all inside. But did you know there’s a whole range of slang terms that capture this act of internalizing emotions and experiences? Join us as we unravel the world of slang for internalize and explore the nuances of this common yet complex behavior. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and gain a deeper understanding of how we process our inner world.

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1. Ingrain

To ingrain something is to internalize it deeply, to the point where it becomes a natural part of one’s thinking or behavior.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Practice these skills until they are ingrained in your muscle memory.”
  • A teacher might encourage students to “ingrain the principles of good writing through consistent practice.”
  • In a self-help context, someone might advise, “Ingrain positive affirmations into your daily routine to boost your self-confidence.”

2. Absorb

To absorb something is to take it in and make it a part of oneself, often by understanding or internalizing it deeply.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to read this book to absorb the knowledge.”
  • In a spiritual context, someone might seek to “absorb the teachings of a wise guru.”
  • A person reflecting on a meaningful experience might say, “I want to absorb the lessons and apply them to my life.”

3. Digest

To digest something is to process and understand it fully, often by breaking it down and internalizing its meaning or implications.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need time to digest the information before I can answer the question.”
  • In a conversation about a complex topic, someone might say, “It takes time to digest all the different perspectives.”
  • A person reflecting on a challenging experience might say, “I need to digest what happened and learn from it.”

4. Incorporate

To incorporate something is to integrate it and make it a part of oneself, often by internalizing and applying it in one’s thoughts, actions, or beliefs.

  • For instance, a business leader might say, “We need to incorporate these new strategies into our company culture.”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “I want to incorporate elements of different art styles into my own work.”
  • A person reflecting on personal growth might say, “I’m working to incorporate self-care practices into my daily routine.”

5. Assimilate

To assimilate something is to make it a part of one’s identity, often by internalizing and adopting its values, beliefs, or behaviors.

  • For example, a person might say, “I want to assimilate the customs and traditions of my new country.”
  • In a discussion about cultural exchange, someone might say, “It’s important to respect and assimilate aspects of other cultures.”
  • A person reflecting on personal development might say, “I’m striving to assimilate new skills and knowledge into my professional life.”

6. Embrace

To fully accept and adopt a belief, idea, or concept as one’s own. It involves incorporating it into one’s thoughts, actions, and identity.

  • For example, “I’ve decided to embrace a minimalist lifestyle and declutter my belongings.”
  • A person might say, “I’m learning to embrace my flaws and accept myself as I am.”
  • In a motivational context, someone might encourage others to “embrace change and embrace new opportunities.”

7. Own

To take responsibility for something and fully accept it as one’s own. It often implies a sense of control, mastery, and accountability.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to own my mistakes and learn from them.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might encourage their team to “own their projects and take pride in their work.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’m working on owning my strengths and embracing my weaknesses.”

8. Integrate

To incorporate something into one’s life or routine, often by blending it with existing practices or beliefs. It involves finding a harmonious balance and making something a seamless part of one’s daily life.

  • For example, “I’m trying to integrate exercise into my daily routine by taking the stairs instead of the elevator.”
  • A person might say, “I’m integrating mindfulness practices into my daily meditation routine.”
  • In a cultural context, someone might strive to “integrate different traditions and celebrate diversity.”

9. Imbibe

To absorb or take in something, often referring to ideas, knowledge, or values, and make them a part of one’s own thinking or behavior.

  • For instance, “I love reading books because they allow me to imbibe different perspectives.”
  • A person might say, “Traveling helps me imbibe different cultures and broaden my worldview.”
  • In a spiritual context, someone might strive to “imbibe the teachings of a spiritual guru and incorporate them into their daily life.”

10. Make it one’s own

To make something uniquely one’s own by personalizing, customizing, or adapting it to suit one’s preferences, style, or needs.

  • For example, “I like to make recipes my own by adding my own twist to them.”
  • A person might say, “I’m making this house my own by decorating it with my favorite artwork.”
  • In a creative context, someone might encourage others to “take inspiration from others but make it their own by adding their unique touch.”

11. Take to heart

– For example, “I really took his advice to heart and made some changes in my life.”

  • When someone says, “I took your words to heart,” it means they considered and internalized the advice or criticism.
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Take this feedback to heart and use it to improve your writing skills.”

12. Make a part of oneself

– For instance, “She made his words a part of herself and used them as motivation.”

  • When someone says, “I’ve made this philosophy a part of myself,” they mean they have fully embraced and internalized the principles.
  • A person might say, “I’ve made this hobby a part of myself,” indicating that it has become a significant and integral aspect of their life.
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13. Get into one’s bones

– For example, “The experience of traveling alone really got into her bones and changed her perspective.”

  • When someone says, “This song gets into my bones,” it means the music resonates with them on a deep emotional level.
  • A person might say, “I can feel the excitement getting into my bones,” expressing their anticipation and enthusiasm.

14. Soak in

– For instance, “She sat in silence, allowing the beauty of the sunset to soak in.”

  • When someone says, “I need some time to let this information soak in,” they mean they need time to process and fully understand it.
  • A person might say, “I want to soak in the atmosphere of this new city,” indicating their desire to fully experience and internalize the surroundings.

15. Get the hang of

– For example, “After a few lessons, she finally got the hang of playing the piano.”

  • When someone says, “I’m starting to get the hang of this new job,” it means they are becoming more comfortable and proficient in their role.
  • A person might say, “It took some time, but I finally got the hang of using this software,” indicating their successful mastery of a new technology.

16. Get the drift

This phrase is used to indicate that someone understands the main point or concept being discussed.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complex theory, you might say, “I think I get the drift, it’s about cause and effect.”
  • In a conversation about a movie plot, someone might say, “I didn’t understand the details, but I got the drift of the story.”
  • When summarizing a lengthy article, you might say, “Let me see if I got the drift: it’s about the importance of time management.”

17. Grok

This term, popularized by science fiction author Robert A. Heinlein, means to fully understand or comprehend something.

  • For instance, if someone explains a complex mathematical equation and you understand it completely, you might say, “I grok it now.”
  • In a discussion about a philosophical concept, someone might say, “I’ve been reading about existentialism, and I’m starting to grok it.”
  • When talking about learning a new language, you might say, “It takes time to grok the grammar and vocabulary of a foreign language.”

18. Get the picture

This phrase is used to indicate that someone understands or comprehends the situation or concept being discussed.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a plan or strategy, you might say, “I get the picture, we need to focus on marketing.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated relationship, someone might say, “After hearing all the details, I finally got the picture.”
  • When summarizing a news article, you might say, “From what I’ve read, I think I get the picture: the economy is improving.”

19. Get it

This phrase is used to indicate that someone understands or comprehends something.

  • For instance, if someone explains a joke and you understand the punchline, you might say, “I get it, that’s really funny.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult concept, someone might say, “I’ve been studying it for hours, but I still don’t get it.”
  • When talking about a complex problem, you might say, “It took me a while, but I finally got it.”

20. Get the feel of

This phrase is used to indicate that someone understands or becomes familiar with something.

  • For example, if someone is teaching you how to play a new sport, you might say, “I’m starting to get the feel of it.”
  • In a conversation about a different culture, someone might say, “It takes time to get the feel of their customs and traditions.”
  • When talking about adapting to a new job, you might say, “After a few weeks, I finally got the feel of the company’s work environment.”

21. Get the sense of

To fully comprehend or grasp the meaning or essence of something. This phrase is often used when trying to internalize or make sense of a concept or idea.

  • For example, “After reading the book, I finally got the sense of what the author was trying to convey.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might say, “I’m still trying to get the sense of how it all fits together.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Keep studying, and eventually you’ll get the sense of the subject.”

22. Get the gist

To understand the basic or general meaning or essence of something. This phrase is often used when summarizing or internalizing information quickly.

  • For instance, “I didn’t have time to read the whole article, but I got the gist of it.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “I missed the beginning, but I still got the gist of the plot.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you explain the main points of the lecture? I didn’t quite get the gist.”

23. Make second nature

To internalize a skill or habit to the point where it becomes natural or automatic. This phrase is often used when referring to repetitive actions or behaviors.

  • For example, “After years of practice, playing the piano has become second nature to me.”
  • In a discussion about driving, someone might say, “Parallel parking used to be difficult, but now it’s second nature.”
  • A coach might advise an athlete, “Keep practicing until shooting becomes second nature.”

24. Take in

To fully understand or internalize something. This phrase is often used when trying to process or make sense of information or experiences.

  • For instance, “After attending the lecture, it took me a while to take in all the new information.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “The plot twist was unexpected. It took me a moment to take it all in.”
  • A person reflecting on a difficult situation might say, “I needed some time to take in everything that happened.”

25. Embed

To firmly establish or internalize something, often through repetition or practice. This term is often used when referring to ideas, beliefs, or habits that become deeply rooted.

  • For example, “Repeating positive affirmations can help embed a sense of self-confidence.”
  • In a discussion about language learning, someone might say, “Immersing yourself in a foreign culture can help embed the language.”
  • A coach might advise a team, “Practice the new strategy until it’s embedded in your gameplay.”

26. Soak up

To absorb or take in information, knowledge, or experiences.

  • For example, “I love to read books and soak up all the knowledge.”
  • A student might say, “I need to soak up all the information before the exam.”
  • Someone might advise, “When you travel, make sure to soak up the local culture.”

27. Engross

To become completely absorbed or engrossed in something.

  • For instance, “I was so engrossed in the movie that I lost track of time.”
  • A person might say, “I can engross myself in a good book for hours.”
  • Someone might recommend, “Find a hobby that truly engrosses you and brings you joy.”

28. Learn by heart

To memorize something completely and be able to recall it without effort.

  • For example, “I learned the lyrics to that song by heart.”
  • A student might say, “I need to learn these formulas by heart for the math test.”
  • Someone might advise, “If you want to impress others, learn a poem by heart and recite it.”

29. Engulf

To completely surround or cover something, often with a strong or overwhelming force.

  • For instance, “The flames quickly engulfed the building.”
  • A person might say, “I felt like I was being engulfed by sadness.”
  • Someone might describe a situation as, “The chaos of the crowd engulfed me.”