Top 61 Slang For Due-To – Meaning & Usage

Have you ever struggled to find the right words to explain why something happened? Well, you’re in luck! We’ve gathered a list of the top slang phrases for “due to” that will not only help you express yourself more creatively, but also make you sound like a language expert. From everyday situations to pop culture references, this list has got you covered. Get ready to upgrade your vocabulary and impress your friends with these trendy alternatives for explaining the cause behind any event.

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2. ‘Cuz

Another shortened version of the word “because,” used in the same way as ’cause.

  • For instance, “I can’t go out tonight ‘cuz I have a deadline to meet.”
  • A person might say, “I’m staying home ‘cuz I don’t feel well.”
  • Someone might explain, “I didn’t buy the dress ‘cuz it was too expensive.”

4. ‘Coz

Yet another shortened version of the word “because,” used interchangeably with ’cause, ‘cuz, and ‘cos.

  • For instance, “I can’t join you for lunch ‘coz I have a meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t go to the concert ‘coz I didn’t have a ticket.”
  • Someone might explain, “I didn’t finish the report ‘coz I ran out of time.”

5. Owing to

A more formal way to express the cause or reason for something.

  • For example, “The game was canceled owing to bad weather.”
  • A person might say, “He couldn’t attend the meeting owing to a family emergency.”
  • Someone might explain, “The delay in shipping was owing to a logistical issue.”

6. Thanks to

This is a phrase used to express gratitude or acknowledgment for something that has happened as a result of a particular reason or cause.

  • For example, “Thanks to my hard work, I got a promotion at work.”
  • A person might say, “Thanks to the support of my family, I was able to achieve my goals.”
  • In a sarcastic tone, someone might say, “Thanks to the terrible weather, my plans got ruined.”

7. On account of

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened or is happening as a result of a specific reason or cause.

  • For instance, “On account of the heavy rain, the outdoor event was canceled.”
  • A person might explain, “On account of my busy schedule, I won’t be able to attend the meeting.”
  • In a formal context, someone might say, “On account of the recent budget cuts, we will have to reduce our staff.”

8. As a result of

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened or is happening as a consequence or outcome of a specific reason or cause.

  • For example, “As a result of the accident, the road was closed for several hours.”
  • A person might say, “As a result of my hard work, I was able to achieve my goals.”
  • In a business context, someone might explain, “As a result of the economic downturn, we had to lay off some employees.”

9. In light of

This phrase is used to introduce a reason or circumstance that should be taken into account or considered when making a decision or judgment.

  • For instance, “In light of recent events, we have decided to increase security measures.”
  • A person might say, “In light of the new information, we need to reevaluate our strategy.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might explain, “In light of your qualifications, we have decided to offer you the job.”

10. In view of

This phrase is used to introduce a reason or circumstance that should be taken into account or considered when making a decision or judgment.

  • For example, “In view of the current situation, we have decided to postpone the event.”
  • A person might say, “In view of your experience, we believe you are the best candidate for the position.”
  • In a legal context, someone might explain, “In view of the evidence presented, the defendant was found guilty.”

11. By reason of

This phrase is used to indicate the cause or reason for something. It is often used in a formal or legal context.

  • For example, “The game was canceled by reason of bad weather.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “The defendant should be held liable by reason of their negligence.”
  • In a formal letter, one might state, “I am unable to attend the meeting by reason of a prior commitment.”

12. By virtue of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a result of a particular quality or circumstance.

  • For instance, “She was given the award by virtue of her outstanding performance.”
  • A person might say, “By virtue of my experience, I am qualified for the job.”
  • In a legal context, one might state, “By virtue of the power vested in me, I hereby declare…”

13. Through

This preposition is used to indicate the cause or reason for something. It implies that something happened as a result of a particular action or process.

  • For example, “I lost my job through no fault of my own.”
  • A person might say, “I achieved success through hard work and determination.”
  • In a discussion about a relationship, one might say, “We went through a rough patch, but we made it work.”

14. Resulting from

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a consequence or effect of a particular action or event.

  • For instance, “The accident was resulting from the driver’s negligence.”
  • A person might say, “The damage to the house was resulting from a severe storm.”
  • In a scientific study, one might state, “The findings suggest that the observed changes are resulting from climate change.”

15. Stemming from

This phrase is used to indicate that something originates or comes from a particular source or cause.

  • For example, “The disagreement stemmed from a misunderstanding.”
  • A person might say, “The protests are stemming from a deep-seated frustration.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, one might state, “The issue is stemming from a lack of communication.”

16. Arising from

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct consequence or outcome of a particular event or situation.

  • For example, “The delays in the project are arising from a lack of funding.”
  • In a discussion about a legal case, someone might say, “The charges against the defendant are arising from a series of fraudulent activities.”
  • A manager might explain, “The changes in company policy are arising from feedback received from employees.”

17. Deriving from

This phrase is used to indicate that something originates or comes from a specific source or cause.

  • For instance, “Her success in the industry is deriving from years of hard work and dedication.”
  • In a conversation about the origins of a particular tradition, someone might say, “The practice of exchanging gifts during the holiday season is deriving from ancient customs.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The theory is deriving from extensive research and experimental data.”

18. Originating from

This phrase is used to indicate that something has its source or beginning in a particular place, time, or cause.

  • For example, “The dish is originating from Italy and has become popular worldwide.”
  • In a discussion about the history of a language, someone might say, “English has many words originating from Latin.”
  • A historian might explain, “The conflict between the two nations is originating from a long-standing territorial dispute.”

19. Following from

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a logical or natural consequence of a previous event or situation.

  • For instance, “The increase in sales is following from the successful marketing campaign.”
  • In a conversation about a scientific discovery, someone might say, “The new theory is following from previous research in the field.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The student’s improved grades are following from their hard work and dedication.”

20. In consequence of

This phrase is used to indicate that something happens or exists as a direct result or effect of a particular event or action.

  • For example, “The cancellation of the event is in consequence of the bad weather.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s financial situation, someone might say, “The layoffs are in consequence of the recent economic downturn.”
  • A doctor might explain, “The patient’s symptoms are in consequence of a viral infection.”

21. With the help of

This phrase is used to indicate that something was made possible or achieved because of assistance from someone or something.

  • For example, “With the help of my friends, I was able to move into my new apartment.”
  • A person might say, “I was able to finish the project with the help of some online tutorials.”
  • Another might say, “With the help of technology, we can communicate with people all over the world.”

22. With the assistance of

This phrase is similar to “with the help of” and is used to indicate that something was accomplished with the aid or support of someone or something.

  • For instance, “With the assistance of my colleagues, I was able to complete the report on time.”
  • A person might say, “I was able to fix my car with the assistance of a mechanic.”
  • Another might say, “With the assistance of modern medicine, we can treat many diseases.”

23. In the wake of

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened or occurred as a result of a previous event or situation.

  • For example, “In the wake of the hurricane, many homes were destroyed.”
  • A person might say, “In the wake of the economic recession, many people lost their jobs.”
  • Another might say, “In the wake of a successful product launch, the company experienced a surge in sales.”

24. Following

This word is used to indicate that something happens or takes place after another event or action.

  • For instance, “Following the meeting, we will have a team lunch.”
  • A person might say, “Following the concert, there will be a fireworks display.”
  • Another might say, “Following the game, the players celebrated their victory.”

25. Due to the fact that

This phrase is used to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “Due to the fact that it was raining, the picnic was canceled.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t attend the party due to the fact that I had to work.”
  • Another might say, “The event was postponed due to the fact that the venue was double-booked.”

26. Owed to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a result or consequence of something else. It suggests that a particular factor or reason is responsible for a certain outcome.

  • For example, “The success of the project is owed to the hard work and dedication of the team.”
  • A writer might say, “The inspiration for this article is owed to my recent trip to Italy.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The improvement in the student’s grades is owed to their consistent studying and effort.”

27. On the grounds of

This phrase is used to indicate that a decision or action is made due to certain reasons or evidence. It suggests that a particular factor or consideration serves as the basis for a decision or judgment.

  • For instance, “The suspect was arrested on the grounds of eyewitness testimonies.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “The case should be dismissed on the grounds of insufficient evidence.”
  • A company might make a policy change on the grounds of customer feedback and complaints.
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28. In consideration of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or provided because certain factors or circumstances are taken into account. It suggests that a particular factor or consideration is given importance or consideration when making a decision.

  • For example, “In consideration of your hard work, we have decided to give you a bonus.”
  • A landlord might offer a rent reduction in consideration of the tenant’s financial difficulties.
  • A professor might grant an extension on an assignment in consideration of a student’s illness.

29. In response to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or said as a reaction or reply to something else. It suggests that a particular event or situation has prompted a response or action.

  • For instance, “The company issued a statement in response to the allegations.”
  • A person might apologize in response to a friend’s complaint or criticism.
  • A government might implement new policies in response to public demand or protests.

30. In accordance with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or followed in agreement or conformity with certain rules, regulations, or principles. It suggests that a particular action or decision is in line with established guidelines or standards.

  • For example, “The project was completed in accordance with the client’s specifications.”
  • A company might make decisions in accordance with its mission statement and values.
  • A teacher might grade assignments in accordance with the grading rubric provided.

31. In line with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done because of a particular reason or cause. It is often used to explain the rationale behind a decision or action.

  • For example, “We canceled the event in line with the new safety guidelines.”
  • A manager might say, “We are implementing these changes in line with our company’s mission and values.”
  • In a discussion about a new policy, someone might ask, “What is the reasoning in line with this decision?”

32. Cuz

This is a shortened form of the word “because” and is commonly used in informal conversations or text messages. It is often used to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For instance, “I can’t go out tonight cuz I have to work.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t study for the test cuz I was too tired.”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “Cuz you didn’t reply to my message earlier?”

33. Coz

Similar to “cuz,” this is another shortened form of the word “because.” It is commonly used in informal conversations or text messages to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t attend the party coz I had other plans.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t eat lunch coz I wasn’t hungry.”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “Coz you didn’t want to join us?”

34. Bcoz

This is a shortened and informal form of the word “because.” It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For instance, “I’m not going to the party bcoz I don’t know anyone there.”
  • A person might say, “I’m running late bcoz of traffic.”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “Bcoz you didn’t like the movie?”

35. Bcz

Similar to “bcoz,” this is another shortened and informal form of the word “because.” It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I can’t come to the meeting bcz I have another appointment.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t call you back bcz my phone died.”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “Bcz you didn’t want to go shopping?”

36. Cos

This is a slang abbreviation of the word “because.” It is often used in casual conversation or texting to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I didn’t go to the party cos I was feeling tired.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t come to the meeting cos I have another appointment.”
  • A text message might read, “Can’t make it tonight, cos I have to work late.”

37. Cuz of

This is a slang phrase that is short for “because of.” It is commonly used in informal speech or writing to indicate the cause or reason for something.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t go to the concert cuz of the bad weather.”
  • A person might say, “I’m staying home tonight cuz of a headache.”
  • Someone might explain, “I missed the bus cuz of the heavy traffic.”

38. Coz of

This is another slang phrase that is an abbreviation of “because of.” It is often used in casual conversation or informal writing to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t finish the project coz of a family emergency.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going out tonight coz of the rainy weather.”
  • Someone might explain, “I’m running late coz of a traffic jam.”

39. Bcoz of

This is a slang abbreviation of “because of.” It is commonly used in casual conversation or text messages to indicate the cause or reason for something.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t attend the party bcoz of work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going to the movie bcoz of a prior commitment.”
  • Someone might explain, “I missed the train bcoz of a delay.”

40. Bcz of

This is a slang abbreviation of “because of.” It is often used in informal writing or text messages to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t make it to the event bcz of a scheduling conflict.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going to the party bcz of a previous engagement.”
  • Someone might explain, “I didn’t get the job bcz of my lack of experience.”

41. Cos of

A shortened form of “because of,” used to indicate the cause or reason for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party cos of the bad weather.”
  • A person might say, “I’m late cos of the traffic.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Can’t make it cos of work.”

42. B/C

An abbreviation of “because,” used to indicate the cause or reason for something.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t attend the meeting b/c I was sick.”
  • A person might explain, “I’m tired b/c I stayed up late studying.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I didn’t go to the party b/c I had other plans.”

43. Owing to the fact that

A formal phrase used to indicate the cause or reason for something.

  • For example, “The event was canceled owing to the fact that it started raining.”
  • A person might explain, “I couldn’t finish the project owing to the fact that I ran out of time.”
  • In a formal essay, someone might write, “The company’s success is owing to the fact that it prioritizes customer satisfaction.”

44. Thanks to the fact that

An expression used to indicate the cause or reason for something, often with a positive connotation.

  • For instance, “Thanks to the fact that I studied hard, I passed the exam.”
  • A person might say, “I got promoted thanks to the fact that I exceeded my sales targets.”
  • In a conversation about a recent success, someone might mention, “We won the game thanks to the fact that our team worked well together.”

45. On account of the fact that

A formal phrase used to indicate the cause or reason for something.

  • For example, “The event was canceled on account of the fact that there was a power outage.”
  • A person might explain, “I couldn’t attend the party on account of the fact that I had a prior commitment.”
  • In a formal report, someone might write, “The project was delayed on account of the fact that there were supply chain issues.”

46. As a result of the fact that

This phrase is often used as a more formal or sophisticated way to express the cause or reason for something. It indicates that something happened because of a certain fact or situation.

  • For example, “She couldn’t attend the meeting as a result of the fact that she was sick.”
  • In a discussion about the economy, someone might say, “Unemployment rates are rising as a result of the fact that many businesses are closing.”
  • A news article might state, “The game was canceled as a result of the fact that the field was flooded.”

48. ‘Cause of the fact that

This phrase is a more casual way to express the cause or reason for something happening. It indicates that something occurred because of a certain fact or situation.

  • For example, “He couldn’t attend the event ’cause of the fact that he had a prior commitment.”
  • In a discussion about traffic congestion, someone might say, “Travel times have increased ’cause of the fact that more people are commuting.”
  • A news report might state, “Flight delays are expected ’cause of the fact that there is bad weather in the area.”

49. Because of the fact that

This phrase is commonly used to explain the cause or reason for something happening. It indicates that something occurred because of a certain fact or situation.

  • For instance, “They canceled the concert because of the fact that the lead singer got sick.”
  • In a conversation about rising prices, someone might say, “The cost of living is increasing because of the fact that inflation is high.”
  • A person might explain, “I couldn’t finish the project on time because of the fact that I ran out of materials.”

50. As a consequence of

This phrase is often used to express the cause or reason for something happening. It indicates that a certain action or event resulted in a specific consequence or outcome.

  • For example, “He lost his job as a consequence of his poor performance.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Extreme weather events are increasing as a consequence of global warming.”
  • A news article might state, “The company’s profits have declined as a consequence of the economic recession.”

51. On the basis of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done because of a particular reason or evidence.

  • For example, “He was hired on the basis of his qualifications and experience.”
  • In a legal context, one might say, “The decision was made on the basis of the evidence presented.”
  • A manager might explain, “We made the promotion on the basis of performance and potential.”

52. On the strength of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done because of the strength or influence of a particular factor.

  • For instance, “He got the job on the strength of his impressive portfolio.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The team won the game on the strength of their strong defense.”
  • A politician might argue, “We passed the bill on the strength of public support.”

53. By dint of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done by the force or strength of a particular factor or effort.

  • For example, “He achieved success by dint of hard work and determination.”
  • In a competitive context, one might say, “She won the race by dint of sheer willpower.”
  • A student might explain, “I passed the exam by dint of studying late into the night.”

54. Throughout

This word is used to indicate that something is happening or being done in every part or aspect of a particular place or time period.

  • For instance, “The party was lively throughout the night.”
  • In a historical context, one might say, “Throughout the Renaissance, art and culture flourished.”
  • A traveler might describe, “Throughout the country, you can find delicious local cuisine.”

55. Via

This word is used to indicate that something is happening or being done by means of a particular route, method, or medium.

  • For example, “I sent the document via email.”
  • In a transportation context, one might say, “You can reach the city via train or bus.”
  • A person might explain, “I found the information via an online search.”

56. By means of

This phrase is used to indicate the method or instrument used to accomplish something.

  • For example, “He solved the problem by means of a new algorithm.”
  • A person might explain, “I was able to fix the leak by means of a temporary patch.”
  • In a discussion about transportation, someone might say, “I prefer to travel by means of public transportation.”

57. By way of

This phrase is used to indicate the route or manner in which something is done or achieved.

  • For instance, “We reached our destination by way of the scenic route.”
  • A person might explain, “I communicated with him by way of email.”
  • In a conversation about communication, someone might say, “By way of text message, I informed her about the change in plans.”

58. In the aftermath of

This phrase is used to indicate the time or events that occur after a significant event or situation.

  • For example, “In the aftermath of the hurricane, many homes were destroyed.”
  • A person might explain, “In the aftermath of the breakup, she focused on self-improvement.”
  • In a discussion about a political scandal, someone might say, “In the aftermath of the scandal, the politician’s reputation was tarnished.”

59. In the face of

This phrase is used to indicate the presence of a difficult or challenging situation and the response to it.

  • For instance, “In the face of adversity, she remained strong.”
  • A person might explain, “In the face of criticism, he stood by his decision.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, someone might say, “In the face of uncertainty, I chose to take a risk.”

60. In the name of

This phrase is used to indicate the reason or justification for an action or decision.

  • For example, “In the name of justice, he fought for equal rights.”
  • A person might explain, “In the name of love, she made sacrifices.”
  • In a discussion about religious beliefs, someone might say, “In the name of God, I swear to tell the truth.”

61. In the interest of

This phrase is used to explain the reason or motivation behind a decision or action.

  • For example, “In the interest of public safety, the event has been canceled.”
  • A company might announce, “In the interest of fairness, we have updated our refund policy.”
  • A teacher could say, “In the interest of time, we will only cover the main points in today’s lesson.”