Top 28 Slang For Eating – Meaning & Usage

From “chowing down” to “grubbing,” the world of slang for eating is as diverse and flavorful as the dishes themselves. Whether you’re a foodie or just looking to spice up your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we dish out a mouthwatering list of the trendiest and most appetizing slang terms for indulging in your favorite meals. Get ready to satisfy your hunger for both food and language in this delectable compilation!

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1. Chow down

This phrase means to eat a large amount of food quickly and with enthusiasm. It is often used to describe someone who is really enjoying their meal or who has a big appetite.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I just want to chow down on a pizza.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m so hungry, let’s chow down on some burgers.”
  • Someone might comment on a delicious meal by saying, “I couldn’t resist chowing down on that homemade lasagna.”

2. Dig in

This phrase means to start eating with enthusiasm and eagerness. It is often used to encourage someone to begin eating or to express one’s own eagerness to start a meal.

  • For instance, at a family dinner, someone might say, “Alright everyone, let’s dig in!”
  • A friend might tell you, “The food’s ready, so dig in and enjoy.”
  • When presented with a delicious-looking dish, you might exclaim, “I can’t wait to dig in!”

3. Nosh

This term refers to eating a small meal or snack, especially between regular meals. It is often used to describe eating something light or casual.

  • For example, “I’m just going to nosh on some chips while I watch TV.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m not hungry enough for a full meal, so I’ll just nosh on some fruit.”
  • When offered a plate of appetizers at a party, you might say, “I’ll just nosh on a few of these delicious bites.”

4. Grub

This term is slang for food, but it can also carry a negative connotation, implying that the food is unappealing or of low quality.

  • For instance, “I’m so hungry, I’ll eat anything. Just give me some grub.”
  • Someone might comment on a cafeteria lunch by saying, “The school serves the worst grub.”
  • When presented with a plate of unappetizing food, you might jokingly say, “Looks like it’s time to dig into this gourmet grub.”

5. Munch

This word means to eat something, often in small bites or with a noticeable crunching sound. It is often used to describe eating snacks or finger foods.

  • For example, “I’m going to munch on these popcorn while watching a movie.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m craving something crunchy to munch on. Do we have any chips?”
  • When enjoying a bag of pretzels, you might say, “I can’t stop munching on these, they’re so addictive!”

6. Scarf down

This phrase means to eat something rapidly and eagerly, often without taking the time to savor or enjoy it.

  • For example, “I was so hungry after work that I scarfed down a whole pizza in minutes.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw you scarfing down those fries earlier. Are you that hungry?”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might mention, “Whenever I’m stressed, I tend to scarf down a pint of ice cream.”

7. Feast

To feast means to indulge in a plentiful and lavish meal, often with a variety of dishes and an abundance of food.

  • For instance, “We feasted on a delicious spread of roasted turkey, mashed potatoes, and pumpkin pie.”
  • During a holiday gathering, someone might say, “Let’s gather around the table and feast together.”
  • A person describing a buffet might exclaim, “There was a feast of options, from sushi to pasta to desserts.”

8. Chow

Chow is a slang term for food or a meal, often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I’m starving! Let’s go grab some chow.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s for chow tonight?”
  • Someone might comment, “That restaurant serves some delicious chow.”

9. Devour

To devour means to eat something voraciously and with great enthusiasm, often leaving nothing behind.

  • For instance, “The kids devoured the entire plate of cookies in minutes.”
  • A person describing their love for a particular food might say, “I could devour a whole pizza by myself.”
  • In a discussion about a delicious meal, someone might mention, “We devoured the steak and licked our plates clean.”

10. Snack

A snack refers to a small amount of food eaten between regular meals, often to satisfy hunger or cravings.

  • For example, “I’m just going to grab a quick snack before we head out.”
  • Someone might say, “I always keep some snacks in my bag in case I get hungry.”
  • A person discussing healthy eating habits might recommend, “Opt for nutritious snacks like fruits or nuts instead of sugary treats.”

11. Gobble up

This phrase is often used to describe someone eating their food in a fast and eager manner.

  • For example, “He gobbled up his dinner in no time.”
  • A parent might say, “My kids always gobble up their snacks after school.”
  • In a food review, someone might write, “I couldn’t resist gobbling up the delicious burger.”

12. Tuck in

This phrase is commonly used to describe someone beginning to eat their meal with enjoyment and eagerness.

  • For instance, “Let’s tuck in, the food looks amazing!”
  • A friend might say, “I’m so hungry, I can’t wait to tuck in.”
  • In a restaurant review, someone might write, “We were excited to tuck in and try the chef’s special dish.”

13. Wolf down

This phrase is often used to describe someone eating their food rapidly and voraciously.

  • For example, “He wolfed down his sandwich in seconds.”
  • A person might say, “I was so hungry, I had to wolf down my dinner.”
  • In a conversation about eating habits, someone might mention, “I tend to wolf down my meals when I’m in a hurry.”

14. Graze

This term is used to describe the act of eating small portions of food frequently or continuously over a period of time.

  • For instance, “I like to graze on snacks while watching TV.”
  • A coworker might say, “I graze on fruits and nuts during the workday.”
  • In a discussion about healthy eating, someone might suggest, “Try grazing on vegetables instead of having large meals.”

15. Savor

This word is used to describe the act of eating slowly and taking pleasure in the flavors and textures of the food.

  • For example, “She savored every bite of the decadent chocolate cake.”
  • A food critic might write, “The chef’s tasting menu was a delightful experience to savor.”
  • In a cooking show, the host might encourage the audience to “savor the aroma and taste of this delicious dish.”

16. Mow down

This phrase means to eat a large amount of food quickly and without much regard for manners or etiquette.

  • For example, “After the game, the team mowed down on pizza and wings.”
  • Someone might say, “I was so hungry, I mowed down on that burger in seconds.”
  • In a conversation about a buffet, a person might comment, “I’m going to mow down on all the different types of desserts.”

17. Pig out

This slang term refers to eating a large amount of food, often in a way that is considered excessive or indulgent.

  • For instance, “I’m going to pig out on ice cream tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I always pig out at Thanksgiving dinner.”
  • In a discussion about cheat meals, someone might mention, “I pigged out on pizza and fries last night.”

18. Nom

This term is often used to express enjoyment or satisfaction while eating something delicious.

  • For example, “These cookies are so good, nom nom!”
  • A person might comment, “I had the best slice of cake today, nom.”
  • In a conversation about favorite foods, someone might say, “I could nom on sushi all day long.”

19. Guzzle

This word refers to consuming food or drink quickly and greedily, often without taking the time to savor or enjoy it fully.

  • For instance, “He guzzled down the soda in one gulp.”
  • A person might say, “I always guzzle my coffee in the morning.”
  • In a conversation about eating habits, someone might admit, “I tend to guzzle my meals when I’m in a hurry.”

20. Chomp

This term means to bite down on something with force, often making a loud chewing sound.

  • For example, “She chomped on the carrot like it was a piece of steak.”
  • A person might say, “I love chomping on crunchy snacks.”
  • In a discussion about eating habits, someone might comment, “I tend to chomp my food when I’m really hungry.”

21. Hoover

Hoover is a slang term used to describe eating with great enthusiasm and speed. It implies that the person is devouring their food in a manner similar to a vacuum cleaner.

  • For example, “After the long hike, I hoovered down a burger and fries.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so hungry, I could hoover up a whole pizza.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I watched him hoover through a plate of spaghetti in record time!”

22. Chomp down

Chomp down is a slang phrase used to describe eating with a lot of force and energy. It suggests that the person is biting down on their food with determination and enjoyment.

  • For instance, “He chomped down on the juicy steak like there was no tomorrow.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw him chomp down on a whole watermelon in one sitting.”
  • Another might comment, “She chomped down on the hot dog and couldn’t stop smiling.”

23. Feast on

Feast on is a phrase used to describe eating a substantial amount of food and thoroughly enjoying it. It conveys the idea of indulging in a delicious meal.

  • For example, “During the holidays, we feast on turkey, stuffing, and all the trimmings.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to feast on a plate of BBQ ribs.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The buffet was incredible – I feasted on a variety of dishes!”

24. Chew the fat

Chew the fat is a slang phrase used to describe having a relaxed and leisurely conversation while eating. It implies that the conversation is light-hearted and enjoyable, similar to the act of chewing food.

  • For instance, “We decided to grab lunch and chew the fat at the local diner.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s go out for dinner and chew the fat about our day.”
  • Another might say, “Whenever we get together, we love to chew the fat over a good meal.”

25. Pick at

Pick at is a phrase used to describe eating in a casual and lackadaisical manner. It suggests that the person is only eating small portions or picking at their food without much interest.

  • For example, “She picked at her salad, barely touching it.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not really hungry, so I’ll just pick at some leftovers.”
  • Another might comment, “He picked at his plate, not really enjoying the meal.”

26. Tuck into

To “tuck into” means to eat a meal or food with great enthusiasm or enjoyment.

  • For example, “After a long day, I can’t wait to tuck into a delicious home-cooked meal.”
  • A food lover might say, “I love tucking into a plate of pasta with lots of cheese on top.”
  • When describing a satisfying meal, one might say, “I tucked into a juicy steak with all the fixings.”

27. Scoff

To “scoff” means to eat quickly or greedily, often without paying much attention to table manners or etiquette.

  • For instance, “He scoffed his dinner down in just a few minutes.”
  • A person might say, “I was so hungry, I couldn’t help but scoff the entire pizza.”
  • When describing someone’s eating habits, one might say, “She’s a fast eater and always scoffs her food.”

28. Munch out

To “munch out” means to eat a large amount of food, often in a casual or relaxed manner.

  • For example, “I’m going to munch out on these chips while watching a movie.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling hungry, let’s munch out on some burgers and fries.”
  • When describing a satisfying meal, one might say, “We munched out on a buffet of delicious dishes.”
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