Top 30 Slang For Unfair – Meaning & Usage

Unfairness is a concept that we’ve all encountered at some point in our lives, whether it’s in school, at work, or in relationships. It can leave us feeling frustrated and powerless. But fear not, as we’ve put together a list of the top slang terms for unfair that will help you navigate these situations with a touch of humor and understanding. Stay tuned to level up your slang game and be ready to tackle any unjust circumstances that come your way!

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1. Rigged

This term refers to a situation where the outcome is predetermined or manipulated in someone’s favor, often unfairly. It implies that the system or process has been tampered with to ensure a desired outcome.

  • For example, a person might say, “The election was rigged in favor of the incumbent.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might claim, “The referee clearly rigged the game in the home team’s favor.”
  • A person who feels cheated might exclaim, “This whole competition is rigged against me!”

2. Screwed

When someone is “screwed,” it means they have been treated unfairly or deceived in some way. It implies that they have been put at a disadvantage or taken advantage of in a situation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I got screwed over by my boss. They promised me a promotion and then gave it to someone else.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might share, “My ex really screwed me over. They cheated and lied to me.”
  • A student who fails an exam they studied hard for might exclaim, “I got screwed by that tricky question!”

3. Cheated

This term refers to being deceived or tricked in a way that results in unfairness or disadvantage. It implies that someone has violated rules or agreements to gain an unfair advantage.

  • For example, a person might say, “I caught my partner cheating on me.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might claim, “The opposing team cheated by using performance-enhancing drugs.”
  • A student who suspects someone copied their answers might accuse, “They cheated off my test!”

4. Shafted

When someone is “shafted,” it means they have been mistreated or treated unfairly. It implies that they have been given the short end of the stick or dealt with in a way that is unfavorable.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I got shafted in the divorce settlement. I ended up with nothing.”
  • In a discussion about work, someone might share, “I always get shafted with the worst shifts and assignments.”
  • A customer who receives poor service might complain, “I feel like I got shafted by that rude employee!”

5. Gamed

This term refers to a situation where someone has manipulated or rigged the outcome in their favor. It implies that the rules or system have been exploited to gain an unfair advantage.

  • For example, a person might say, “They gamed the system to win the competition.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might claim, “The candidate gamed the polls to appear more popular than they actually are.”
  • A student who finds a loophole to get extra time on an exam might confess, “I gamed the system to get an advantage.”

6. Swindled

To be deceived or tricked out of something, usually money or valuables, by someone dishonest. “Swindled” is a slang term used to describe being taken advantage of in a deceitful manner.

  • For example, “I bought a fake designer handbag online and got swindled out of my money.”
  • A person might say, “Watch out for that scammer, he swindled me out of my savings.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful when making online purchases, you don’t want to get swindled.”

7. Unjust

Not in accordance with justice or fairness. “Unjust” is a word used to describe a situation or action that is not morally or ethically right.

  • For instance, “The judge’s ruling was unjust and favored the wealthy.”
  • A person might say, “It’s unjust that some people have access to quality education while others don’t.”
  • Another might argue, “Discrimination is a clear example of unjust treatment.”

8. Unequal

Not equal in quantity, size, value, or status. “Unequal” refers to a lack of fairness or balance in a situation.

  • For example, “The distribution of wealth in our society is highly unequal.”
  • A person might say, “Unequal pay for equal work is a form of discrimination.”
  • Another might comment, “The educational opportunities in this country are unequal and favor the privileged.”

9. Biased

Having a preference or inclination for or against something or someone, often without considering the facts objectively. “Biased” refers to a lack of fairness or impartiality in judgment.

  • For instance, “The news article had a biased perspective, presenting only one side of the story.”
  • A person might say, “The judge’s decision seemed biased, favoring the defendant.”
  • Another might argue, “We need unbiased reporting to get a true understanding of the situation.”

10. Crooked

Having or showing a lack of integrity or moral principles. “Crooked” is a slang term used to describe someone who is deceitful or engages in illegal or unethical behavior.

  • For example, “The politician was involved in a crooked scheme to embezzle funds.”
  • A person might say, “Beware of that crooked salesman, he’ll try to rip you off.”
  • Another might comment, “The company’s crooked practices led to its downfall.”

11. Partial

This term refers to a situation where someone shows favoritism or prejudice towards a particular side or viewpoint, often resulting in an unfair outcome.

  • For example, in a sports match, a fan might complain, “The referee is being partial to the home team.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might accuse a news outlet of being partial towards a specific candidate.
  • A student might feel frustrated and say, “The teacher’s grading seems partial and unfair.”

12. Unethical

This word is used to describe actions or behavior that goes against accepted moral principles or standards. It suggests that something is not just unfair, but also morally questionable or improper.

  • For instance, a person might say, “It’s unethical for a doctor to perform unnecessary surgeries for profit.”
  • In a business context, someone might criticize a company’s practices by saying, “Their treatment of employees is unethical.”
  • A journalist might write an article about an unethical politician, highlighting their corrupt actions.
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13. Unscrupulous

This term describes someone who is willing to act in an unfair or dishonest way to achieve their goals. It implies a lack of moral integrity or principles.

  • For example, a person might say, “The unscrupulous salesman tricked me into buying a faulty product.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might criticize a politician by saying, “They are known for their unscrupulous tactics.”
  • A journalist might write an exposé on an unscrupulous business owner, revealing their exploitative practices.

14. Deceptive

This word is used to describe something that is intentionally designed to mislead or trick others. It implies a sense of unfairness because it involves manipulating others through false information or appearances.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The advertisement was deceptive, making the product seem better than it actually is.”
  • In a legal context, someone might accuse a company of deceptive practices, such as false advertising.
  • A consumer might warn others by saying, “Be careful when dealing with that company, they have a history of deceptive business practices.”

15. Unbalanced

This term refers to a situation where things are not evenly distributed or fair. It suggests a lack of equilibrium or fairness in a particular context.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might complain, “The moderator’s questions are unbalanced, favoring one side.”
  • In a discussion about wealth distribution, a person might argue, “The current economic system is unbalanced, with the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer.”
  • A student might feel frustrated and say, “The grading system is unbalanced, giving too much weight to one assignment.”

16. Discriminatory

This term refers to the unfair or prejudicial treatment of individuals or groups based on characteristics such as race, gender, or religion. Discriminatory actions can range from overt acts of exclusion to more subtle forms of bias.

  • For example, “The company’s hiring practices were found to be discriminatory towards women.”
  • In a discussion about equal rights, someone might say, “We need to address the discriminatory policies that still exist.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I faced discriminatory remarks and actions throughout my career.”

17. Prejudiced

Prejudiced refers to holding preconceived opinions or attitudes about a person or group without sufficient knowledge or understanding. It often involves making judgments based on stereotypes or biases.

  • For instance, “His prejudiced views prevent him from seeing the truth.”
  • In a conversation about racial equality, someone might say, “Prejudiced attitudes continue to perpetuate discrimination.”
  • A person sharing their encounter might say, “I experienced prejudiced comments from strangers on a regular basis.”

18. Inequitable

Inequitable describes something that is unjust or unfair, particularly in terms of distribution or treatment. It implies a lack of fairness or equality in a situation.

  • For example, “The distribution of wealth in the country is highly inequitable.”
  • In a discussion about educational opportunities, someone might say, “The current system is inherently inequitable.”
  • A person sharing their frustration might say, “I’ve faced inequitable treatment throughout my life.”

19. Oppressive

Oppressive refers to something that is suppressive, unjust, or burdensome. It often implies the use of power or authority to control or limit the freedom and rights of others.

  • For instance, “The regime’s oppressive policies led to widespread protests.”
  • In a conversation about workplace dynamics, someone might say, “The oppressive environment made it difficult to speak up.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I lived under oppressive conditions for years.”

20. Underhanded

Underhanded describes actions that are deceptive, deceitful, or dishonest. It implies a sneaky or manipulative approach to achieve one’s goals, often at the expense of others.

  • For example, “He used underhanded tactics to win the competition.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The candidate’s underhanded campaign strategies are concerning.”
  • A person sharing their encounter might say, “I’ve experienced underhanded behavior from colleagues in the past.”

21. Unreasonable

When someone is being unreasonable, they are not considering the facts or logic of a situation and are acting in an unfair manner.

  • For example, if a boss denies an employee’s request for time off without a valid reason, the employee might say, “That’s so unreasonable!”
  • In a disagreement, one person might accuse the other of being unreasonable by saying, “You’re not being fair or logical in your argument.”
  • If a teacher gives an assignment with an unrealistic deadline, a student might complain, “That’s totally unreasonable!”

22. Exploitative

When something is exploitative, it means that someone is unfairly benefiting from the labor, resources, or vulnerabilities of others.

  • For instance, if a company pays its workers extremely low wages while making huge profits, it can be described as exploitative.
  • In a discussion about child labor, someone might argue, “Exploitative practices like forcing children to work in dangerous conditions need to be abolished.”
  • If a person is being taken advantage of in a relationship, a friend might say, “You deserve better than that exploitative behavior.”

23. Unjustified

When something is unjustified, it means there is no valid or fair reason for it to occur.

  • For example, if a student receives a failing grade without any explanation or feedback from the teacher, they might feel it is unjustified.
  • In a debate, one person might criticize the other’s argument by saying, “Your claim is completely unjustified and lacks any evidence.”
  • If a person is unfairly accused of a crime without any proof, they might protest, “This arrest is unjustified!”

24. Unmerited

When something is unmerited, it means it is not deserved or earned based on one’s actions or qualities.

  • For instance, if someone receives a promotion without putting in any effort or showing any skills, it can be considered unmerited.
  • In a conversation about college admissions, someone might argue, “Affirmative action is necessary to ensure that admission decisions are not based on unmerited privileges.”
  • If a person receives praise for an accomplishment they had no part in, they might say, “This recognition is unmerited.”

25. Unwarranted

When something is unwarranted, it means it is not justified, authorized, or necessary.

  • For example, if someone receives criticism for a mistake they didn’t make, they might feel it is unwarranted.
  • In a discussion about privacy, one person might argue, “The government’s surveillance programs are unwarranted and infringe upon our rights.”
  • If a person is punished excessively for a minor offense, they might protest, “This punishment is unwarranted!”

26. One-sided

This term refers to a situation or decision that is not fair because it heavily favors one side over the other. It implies a lack of fairness or impartiality.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might say, “The moderator’s questions were clearly one-sided in favor of the incumbent.”
  • In a sports match, a fan might complain, “The referee’s calls were completely one-sided. It was unfair.”
  • A person discussing a legal case might argue, “The judge’s ruling was one-sided and did not consider all the evidence.”

27. Jipped

This slang term is used to describe a situation where someone feels they have been treated unfairly or deceived.

  • For instance, if someone buys a faulty product, they might say, “I got jipped. This thing doesn’t work at all.”
  • In a game, a player might complain, “I got jipped. They changed the rules halfway through.”
  • A person might say, “I feel jipped by the company. They promised a refund but never delivered.”

28. Skewed

When something is skewed, it means it is distorted or biased in a particular direction. It implies a lack of fairness or accuracy.

  • For example, in a study, a researcher might say, “The data is skewed because the sample size was too small.”
  • In a news article, a reader might comment, “The author’s perspective is clearly skewed. They only present one side of the story.”
  • A person discussing a political poll might argue, “The results are skewed because they only surveyed a certain demographic.”

29. Uneven

Uneven refers to something that is not equal or fair in its distribution. It implies a lack of balance or symmetry.

  • For instance, in a competition, someone might say, “The teams were uneven. It wasn’t a fair match.”
  • In a negotiation, a person might complain, “The distribution of benefits is uneven. It’s not a fair deal.”
  • A person discussing income inequality might argue, “The wealth distribution in our society is uneven and unfair.”

30. Deceitful

Deceitful describes someone or something that is intentionally misleading or dishonest. It implies a lack of trust or fairness.

  • For example, if someone lies to their friend, they might be called deceitful.
  • In a business transaction, a person might say, “The seller was deceitful. They didn’t disclose all the information.”
  • A person discussing a politician might argue, “Their campaign promises were deceitful. They never intended to follow through.”