Top 82 Slang For Email – Meaning & Usage

Email, the ubiquitous mode of communication in the digital age, has its own set of slang and abbreviations that can leave even the most tech-savvy individuals scratching their heads. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the depths of the internet to compile a list of the top slang for email that will have you speaking the language of the inbox like a pro. Get ready to level up your email game and never feel lost in the email thread again!

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1. BTW

Used to introduce additional information or a side note in an email. It is a casual and informal way to provide extra context or share something relevant.

  • For example, “BTW, I found a great article that might help with our project.”
  • A colleague might write, “BTW, the meeting has been rescheduled to 2 PM.”
  • In an email thread, someone might add, “BTW, I heard back from the client and they loved our proposal.”

2. FYI

Used to provide information or updates to the recipient without requiring a response. It is a way to share relevant details or keep someone in the loop.

  • For instance, “FYI, the deadline for the project has been extended by a week.”
  • A supervisor might email, “FYI, there will be a team meeting tomorrow at 10 AM.”
  • In a group email, someone might add, “FYI, I’ve attached the latest version of the report for your review.”

3. ASAP

Used to indicate urgency and request prompt action or response. It is a way to emphasize the time-sensitive nature of a task or request.

  • For example, “Can you please send me the updated file ASAP? We need it for the presentation.”
  • A manager might write, “I need your feedback on the proposal ASAP so we can finalize it.”
  • In a follow-up email, someone might ask, “Any updates on the project? We need the information ASAP.”

4. LOL

Used to indicate laughter or amusement in an email. It is a way to express humor or lighten the tone of a message.

  • For instance, “That joke you shared was hilarious. LOL!”
  • A friend might write, “LOL, I can’t believe what happened in that video you sent.”
  • In response to a funny story, someone might reply, “LOL, thanks for sharing. It made my day.”

5. OMG

Used to express surprise, excitement, or disbelief in an email. It is a way to convey strong emotions or reactions.

  • For example, “OMG, I just got promoted! I can’t believe it!”
  • A colleague might write, “OMG, did you see the latest update from the CEO? It’s amazing!”
  • In response to a shocking news article, someone might reply, “OMG, that’s unbelievable. I can’t wrap my head around it.”

6. TTYL

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will talk to the recipient at a later time or date. It is often used as a closing phrase in informal email conversations.

  • For example, “I need to run now. TTYL!”
  • A person might reply, “No problem. TTYL!”
  • In a longer email thread, someone might say, “I’ll send you the details later. TTYL!”

7. BRB

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will be away from the conversation or email temporarily and will return shortly. It is commonly used in informal email exchanges.

  • For instance, “I need to grab a coffee. BRB!”
  • A person might reply, “Take your time. BRB!”
  • In a group email discussion, someone might say, “I’ll be back in a few minutes. BRB!”

8. IMHO

This acronym is used to express that the following statement is the writer’s personal opinion and may not be universally accepted. It is often used when sharing subjective thoughts or beliefs in email conversations.

  • For example, “IMHO, the best solution is to start from scratch.”
  • A person might reply, “I respect your IMHO, but I think we should consider other options.”
  • In a heated email exchange, someone might say, “IMHO, your approach is not practical.”

9. TBH

This acronym is used to indicate that the writer is about to express their honest opinion or provide truthful information. It is commonly used in email conversations to add sincerity or transparency.

  • For instance, “TBH, I don’t think this project will be successful.”
  • A person might reply, “Thanks for being TBH. We need to address the challenges.”
  • In a feedback email, someone might say, “TBH, your presentation skills need improvement.”

10. ROFL

This acronym is used to express that something is extremely funny. It is often used in email conversations to indicate laughter or amusement.

  • For example, “That joke you told was hilarious! ROFL!”
  • A person might reply, “I’m glad you found it funny. ROFL!”
  • In a casual email exchange, someone might say, “I can’t stop laughing. ROFL!”

11. IDK

This is a shorthand way of expressing that the person does not have the answer or knowledge about something. It is often used as a quick response when someone is unsure or doesn’t have the information at hand.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you know when the meeting is?”, a reply could be, “IDK, I’ll check and let you know.”
  • In a discussion about a topic someone is unfamiliar with, they might say, “IDK much about that, sorry.”
  • A person might use this acronym when they are genuinely unsure about something, saying, “IDK the answer, can you look it up?”

12. NVM

This is a phrase used to indicate that something previously mentioned or asked about is not important or no longer relevant. It is often used to dismiss or retract a previous statement or question.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you send me that file?”, but then realizes they found it themselves, they might say, “NVM, I found it.”
  • In a conversation where plans have changed, someone might say, “NVM, let’s meet at the coffee shop instead.”
  • A person might use this phrase to apologize for bringing up a topic, saying, “NVM, it’s not something we need to discuss.”

13. GTG

This is a quick way of indicating that the person needs to leave or end the conversation. It is often used as a polite way of saying goodbye or that they have to attend to something else.

  • For example, if someone is in a chat and needs to leave, they might say, “GTG, talk to you later.”
  • In a discussion where someone has to end a call, they might say, “GTG, my next meeting is starting.”
  • A person might use this acronym to let others know they are signing off, saying, “I’m getting tired, GTG, goodnight!”

14. LMK

This is a phrase used to ask someone to inform or update the person on a particular matter. It is often used to request information or to express interest in being kept informed.

  • For instance, if someone is planning an event and wants to know who can attend, they might say, “Please RSVP and LMK if you’re coming.”
  • In a conversation about future plans, someone might say, “LMK when you’re available and we can schedule a meeting.”
  • A person might use this phrase to ask for feedback or input, saying, “LMK your thoughts on the proposal.”

15. AFAIK

This is a phrase used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the person’s current knowledge and may not be definitive or complete. It is often used to clarify that the person’s statement is not an absolute fact.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a topic and wants to provide a disclaimer, they might say, “AFAIK, this is how the process works, but I could be wrong.”
  • In a conversation where someone is sharing information they heard from someone else, they might say, “AFAIK, the event is scheduled for next week, but I haven’t received confirmation.”
  • A person might use this phrase to indicate their limited knowledge, saying, “AFAIK, there are no updates on the project, but I’ll double-check.”

16. SMH

Used to express disappointment, disapproval, or disbelief. It’s often used in response to something foolish or ridiculous.

  • For example, “I can’t believe she said that. SMH.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s poor decision, a user might comment, “SMH, some people never learn.”
  • Another might say, “SMH at the lack of common sense in this situation.”

17. JK

Used to indicate that the previous statement was not serious and should not be taken literally.

  • For instance, “I heard you won the lottery! JK, just messing with you.”
  • In a playful conversation, someone might respond, “You’re so mean! JK, I know you’re just joking.”
  • Another might say, “I can’t believe you fell for that prank. JK, it was a good one though!”

18. HTH

A polite way to offer assistance or provide information to someone. It’s commonly used at the end of an email or message.

  • For example, “Let me know if you have any other questions. HTH!”
  • In a customer support email, a representative might write, “I’ve attached a troubleshooting guide. HTH!”
  • Another might say, “I’m sorry to hear about your issue. Here are some steps to resolve it. HTH!”

19. WTH

An expression of surprise, confusion, or disbelief. It’s a toned-down version of the more explicit phrase “What the hell.”

  • For instance, “WTH is going on here? This makes no sense.”
  • In a frustrating situation, a person might exclaim, “WTH, why won’t this computer work?”
  • Another might say, “I just got a parking ticket. WTH, I was only gone for 5 minutes!”

20. ICYMI

Used to bring attention to something that the recipient may have missed or overlooked. It’s often used in email subject lines or as a preface to important information.

  • For example, “ICYMI: The meeting has been rescheduled to tomorrow.”
  • In a newsletter, a writer might use ICYMI to highlight a recent article, “ICYMI: Check out our interview with a famous author.”
  • Another might say, “ICYMI, there’s a sale happening this weekend. Don’t miss out!”

21. YOLO

An expression used to emphasize the importance of living life to the fullest and taking risks. It encourages individuals to seize opportunities and not worry about the consequences.

  • For instance, in an email discussing a spontaneous trip, someone might write, “Let’s book those tickets and go on an adventure! YOLO!”
  • In a conversation about trying new experiences, a person might say, “I decided to take up surfing because, hey, YOLO!”
  • Another might use it humorously, “I just bought a whole pizza for myself. YOLO, right?”

22. BFF

A term used to describe a close and enduring friendship. It signifies a deep bond and loyalty between two individuals.

  • For example, in an email to a long-time friend, one might write, “Hey BFF, it’s been too long since we caught up. Let’s plan a reunion soon!”
  • When discussing a supportive friendship, someone might say, “I’m grateful to have my BFF by my side through thick and thin.”
  • Another might use it jokingly, “You’re my BFF, but you still owe me that money!”

23. TMI

Used to indicate that someone has shared more personal or intimate details than necessary or appropriate. It is often used humorously to acknowledge an oversharing of information.

  • For instance, in an email discussing a medical procedure, someone might write, “TMI alert: I had to get a colonoscopy today. Don’t worry, I’ll spare you the details!”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s relationship problems, a person might say, “She went into TMI territory and started talking about their bedroom issues.”
  • Another might use it lightheartedly, “Okay, TMI, but I just found out my neighbor’s pet turtle has a better social life than me.”

24. IMO

Used to preface a statement or viewpoint that expresses one’s personal perspective. It indicates that the following statement is subjective and may not be universally agreed upon.

  • For example, in an email discussing a movie, one might write, “IMO, the ending was a bit predictable, but overall it was an enjoyable film.”
  • When expressing a personal preference, someone might say, “IMO, pizza is the best food ever created.”
  • Another might use it to acknowledge differing opinions, “IMO, pineapple on pizza is a culinary abomination, but to each their own!”

25. WYD

A shorthand way of asking “What are you doing?” It is often used in casual conversations to inquire about someone’s current activities.

  • For instance, in an email to a friend, one might write, “Hey, WYD this weekend? Want to grab lunch?”
  • When checking in on a colleague, someone might say, “WYD? Need any help with that project?”
  • Another might use it playfully, “WYD? Procrastinating like me or actually being productive?”

26. RN

This abbreviation is commonly used to indicate that something needs to be done immediately or that something is happening at the present moment. It is often used in emails to emphasize urgency.

  • For example, a colleague might send an email saying, “We need your input on the project RN.”
  • In a work-related email, someone might write, “The client is requesting a response RN.”
  • A supervisor might send an email saying, “I need to speak with you RN regarding an urgent matter.”

27. FWIW

This phrase is used to introduce a piece of information or opinion that may not be of great importance or relevance, but is still worth mentioning. It is often used in emails to provide additional context or perspective.

  • For instance, in a group email, someone might write, “FWIW, I think we should consider a different approach.”
  • When sharing a suggestion, a person might say, “FWIW, I had a similar experience with a previous project.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might add, “FWIW, I believe this option has the most potential.”

28. TBT

This acronym is commonly used on social media platforms, including emails, to share or reminisce about past events, memories, or experiences. It is often used in emails to share old photos or stories.

  • For example, someone might send an email saying, “TBT to our team outing last year. Good times!”
  • When sharing a nostalgic moment, a person might write, “TBT to when we first started working together. Time flies!”
  • In a company newsletter, an employee might contribute a TBT section featuring old company photos.
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29. AMA

This phrase is commonly used in emails to invite recipients to ask questions about a specific topic or experience. It is often used in professional settings to facilitate open communication and knowledge-sharing.

  • For instance, a speaker might send an email saying, “I will be hosting an AMA session next week. Please feel free to ask any questions.”
  • In a company-wide email, a department head might write, “As part of our ongoing transparency initiative, we are introducing AMA sessions with the leadership team.”
  • A subject matter expert might offer an AMA session to share insights and expertise with colleagues.

30. TL;DR

This abbreviation is commonly used in emails to provide a concise summary or overview of a longer message or document. It is often used when the recipient may not have the time or attention span to read the entire content.

  • For example, a person might write, “TL;DR: The report highlights key findings and recommendations for the upcoming quarter.”
  • When summarizing a lengthy email, someone might write, “TL;DR: We need to reschedule the meeting due to unforeseen circumstances.”
  • In a reply to a lengthy thread, a person might write, “TL;DR: We have decided to move forward with Option B.”

31. Drop me an email

This phrase is used to request someone to send an email to the speaker. It’s a casual and informal way of asking for communication through email.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to drop me an email.”
  • A colleague might say, “Can you drop me an email with the details of the meeting?”
  • In a work setting, a manager might instruct, “If you need to discuss anything, drop me an email and we can set up a meeting.”

32. Get in touch

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact the speaker, usually through email. It’s a versatile phrase that can be used in both formal and informal settings.

  • For instance, “If you have any further inquiries, please get in touch.”
  • A business owner might say, “If you’re interested in our services, get in touch and we can discuss the details.”
  • A friend might ask, “We should catch up soon. Get in touch and let’s plan something.”

33. Let me know

This phrase is used to ask someone to inform the speaker about something, often through email. It’s a simple and straightforward way of requesting communication.

  • For example, “If you find out any more information, please let me know.”
  • A colleague might say, “Let me know if you need any assistance with the project.”
  • In a personal context, someone might ask, “Are you free this weekend? Let me know and we can make plans.”

34. Drop me a line

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a message, typically through email. It’s a casual and friendly way of requesting communication.

  • For instance, “If you have any updates, feel free to drop me a line.”
  • A friend might say, “I haven’t heard from you in a while. Drop me a line and let me know how you’re doing.”
  • In a professional context, a client might request, “Can you drop me a line with the project timeline?”

35. Shoot me an email

This phrase is used to ask someone to send an email to the speaker. It’s a more informal and casual way of requesting communication through email.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to shoot me an email.”
  • A colleague might say, “Shoot me an email with the details and I’ll get back to you.”
  • In a business context, a supervisor might instruct, “If you need to request time off, shoot me an email with the dates.”

36. Hit me up

This phrase is used to ask someone to reach out or contact you. It can be used when requesting someone to send you an email.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, hit me up via email.”
  • A colleague might say, “If you need any help with the project, hit me up and we can discuss it over email.”
  • Someone might request, “If you have any updates, hit me up with an email.”

37. Ping me

This term is used to ask someone to send you a message, typically through email. It can be used when requesting a quick update or notification.

  • For instance, “Ping me with the details via email.”
  • A coworker might say, “If there are any changes to the schedule, ping me via email.”
  • Someone might request, “If you have any questions, feel free to ping me with an email.”

38. Holler at me

This phrase is used to ask someone to get in touch with you, usually through email. It can be used when requesting a conversation or discussion.

  • For example, “If you have any ideas, holler at me via email.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s catch up soon. Holler at me over email and we can set a date.”
  • Someone might request, “If you want to collaborate, holler at me with an email.”

39. Slide into my DMs

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to send you a direct message, which in the context of email would be a private or personal message.

  • For instance, “If you have any confidential information, slide into my DMs via email.”
  • A coworker might say, “If you need to discuss something sensitive, slide into my DMs with an email.”
  • Someone might request, “If you want to share your thoughts privately, slide into my DMs via email.”

40. Give me a shout

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact you, typically through email. It can be used when requesting a conversation or seeking assistance.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, give me a shout via email.”
  • A colleague might say, “If you need help with the report, give me a shout over email.”
  • Someone might request, “If you want to discuss the project further, give me a shout with an email.”

41. Fire me an email

This phrase is a casual way of asking someone to send an email to the speaker. It implies a sense of urgency or importance.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “Hey, if you have any questions, just fire me an email.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “If you need anything, don’t hesitate to fire me an email.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you fire me an email with the details of the party?”

42. Reach out to me

This phrase is used to ask someone to get in touch with the speaker, typically through email or another form of communication. It suggests a willingness to help or be available.

  • For instance, a business contact might say, “If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me.”
  • In a professional context, a mentor might say, “If you need guidance, don’t hesitate to reach out to me.”
  • A friend might say, “If you’re ever in town, reach out to me and we’ll grab coffee.”

43. Send me a message

This phrase is a straightforward request for someone to send a message, often through email or another messaging platform. It can be used in both professional and personal contexts.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “If you have any updates, please send me a message.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “If you want to chat, send me a message on social media.”
  • A family member might ask, “Can you send me a message with the details of the family gathering?”

44. Shoot me a note

This phrase is a more casual way of asking someone to send a message, typically through email. It implies a sense of informality and ease.

  • For instance, a colleague might say, “If you have any ideas, just shoot me a note.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “If you need to discuss something, feel free to shoot me a note.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you shoot me a note with the directions to the party?”

45. DM me

This phrase is commonly used in online platforms and social media to ask someone to send a private message. It implies a desire for direct and private communication.

  • For example, a social media influencer might say, “If you have any questions, feel free to DM me.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “If you want to share something personal, DM me instead.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you DM me your phone number so we can chat privately?”

46. Hit me with an email

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you an email. It implies that you want the person to contact you through email rather than any other form of communication.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, hit me with an email and I’ll get back to you.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might say, “If you need any documents, hit me with an email and I’ll send them to you.”
  • A friend might say, “If you want to make plans, hit me with an email and we can discuss it.”

47. Holla at me

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to contact you. It can be used in various contexts and implies that you want the person to reach out to you for any reason.

  • For instance, “If you need any help, holla at me and I’ll assist you.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “If you want to hang out this weekend, holla at me.”
  • A colleague might say, “If you have any questions about the project, holla at me and I’ll clarify.”

48. Buzz me

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to contact you, often by phone. It implies that you want the person to call you instead of using any other form of communication.

  • For example, “If you need immediate assistance, buzz me and I’ll help you right away.”
  • In a professional context, a coworker might say, “If you have any urgent matters, buzz me and we can discuss them.”
  • A friend might say, “If you want to make plans for the weekend, buzz me and we can figure something out.”

49. Give me a holler

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact you. It is a casual way of saying “reach out to me” and implies that you want the person to get in touch with you for any reason.

  • For instance, “If you have any questions, give me a holler and I’ll provide the answers.”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “If you want to meet up, give me a holler and we can make plans.”
  • A colleague might say, “If you need any help with the project, give me a holler and I’ll assist you.”

50. Send me a text

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you a text message. It implies that you prefer communication through text rather than any other form of communication.

  • For example, “If you have any updates, send me a text and let me know.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “If you want to chat, send me a text and we can catch up.”
  • A friend might say, “If you want to make plans, send me a text and we can figure out the details.”

51. Hit me on email

This phrase is used to ask someone to communicate with you via email. It implies that you prefer to be reached through email rather than other forms of communication.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, hit me on email and I’ll get back to you.”
  • A colleague might say, “I need to discuss something with you. Can you hit me on email later?”
  • In a professional setting, someone might write, “Please hit me on email to schedule a meeting.”

52. Holler if you need anything

This slang phrase is used to offer assistance or support to someone. It implies that the person should reach out to you if they need anything.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I’ll be here all day, so holler if you need anything.”
  • In a work context, a supervisor might tell their team, “I’m available all week, so don’t hesitate to holler if you need anything.”
  • A customer service representative might say, “If you have any questions or concerns, holler and I’ll be happy to assist you.”

53. Shoot me a quick email

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you a quick or brief email. It implies that you prefer to receive a concise message rather than a lengthy one.

  • For example, “If you have any updates, please shoot me a quick email.”
  • A coworker might say, “I need your input on this project. Can you shoot me a quick email with your thoughts?”
  • In an informal setting, someone might write, “Hey, shoot me a quick email when you get a chance.”

54. Get at me

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to contact or reach out to you. It implies that you are open to communication and available for contact.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I haven’t seen you in a while. Get at me and let’s catch up.”
  • In a professional context, a colleague might write, “If you have any questions about the project, get at me and I’ll help you out.”
  • A supervisor might say, “I need to discuss your performance. Get at me after the meeting.”

55. Holler if you have any questions

This phrase is used to invite someone to ask questions or seek clarification. It implies that you are available and willing to provide assistance or information.

  • For example, “I just explained the new process, but holler if you have any questions.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’m here to help, so holler if you have any questions about the assignment.”
  • In a customer service context, a representative might write, “We’re here to assist you, so holler if you have any questions or concerns.”

56. Drop me a message

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a message or email. It is a casual and informal way of requesting communication.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to drop me a message.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll drop you a message with the details of the meeting.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might instruct, “Drop me a message if you need any assistance.”

57. Hit me with a message

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a message or email. It implies a sense of urgency or a desire for immediate communication.

  • For instance, “I need your input on this project, so hit me with a message as soon as possible.”
  • A friend might say, “I haven’t heard from you in a while, so hit me with a message and let’s catch up.”
  • In a business context, a client might request, “If you have any updates on the proposal, hit me with a message.”

58. Give me a buzz

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to contact you, either through a phone call or email. It suggests a desire for communication and can be used in both formal and informal settings.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, give me a buzz and I’ll be happy to help.”
  • A coworker might say, “Give me a buzz when you’re ready to discuss the project.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might instruct, “If you need to schedule a meeting, give me a buzz and we’ll find a time that works.”

59. Slide into my inbox

This phrase is a playful way of asking someone to send an email. It implies a sense of familiarity and suggests a desire for direct communication.

  • For instance, “If you have any updates, feel free to slide into my inbox.”
  • A friend might say, “I saw something that reminded me of you, so I had to slide into your inbox with a funny meme.”
  • In a professional context, a colleague might request, “If you need the latest report, slide into my inbox and I’ll send it to you.”

60. Holler if you need help

This phrase is used to offer help or support and encourages someone to reach out for assistance. It is a casual and friendly way of expressing availability for communication.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, just holler and I’ll be there to help.”
  • A coworker might say, “Holler if you need help with that project, I have some experience in that area.”
  • In a customer service context, a representative might say, “If you encounter any issues, just holler and we’ll resolve them as quickly as possible.”

61. Shoot me a quick message

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a short email.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “Shoot me a quick message with the details of the meeting.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you shoot me a quick message about the party tomorrow?”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “If you have any questions, shoot me a quick message.”

62. Get in touch with me

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact or reach out to you, typically through email.

  • For instance, a business professional might say, “If you have any further questions, please get in touch with me.”
  • A job applicant might include in their cover letter, “Please feel free to get in touch with me to discuss my qualifications.”
  • A customer service representative might tell a customer, “If you need assistance, please get in touch with me.”

63. Holler if you have any concerns

This phrase is used to encourage someone to inform you if they have any worries or issues.

  • For example, a manager might say, “If you have any concerns about the project, holler and we’ll address them.”
  • A team leader might tell their members, “Feel free to holler if you have any concerns about the upcoming deadline.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Remember, holler if you have any concerns about the assignment.”

64. Drop me a quick note

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a short and concise email.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “If you have any updates, please drop me a quick note.”
  • A friend might ask, “Could you drop me a quick note about the time of our meeting tomorrow?”
  • A supervisor might request, “After the meeting, please drop me a quick note summarizing the key points.”

65. Hit me up if you have any questions

This phrase is used to invite someone to contact you if they have any inquiries or need further information.

  • For example, a professor might say, “If you have any questions about the assignment, hit me up.”
  • A mentor might tell their mentee, “Don’t hesitate to hit me up if you have any questions about the industry.”
  • A customer support agent might say, “Our team is here to help, so hit us up if you have any questions.”

66. E-message

This term is a slang for email, referring to a digital communication sent electronically.

  • For example, “I’ll send you an e-message with all the details.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you receive my e-message about the meeting?”
  • Another might say, “I prefer e-messages over phone calls for quick communication.”

67. Mail

This is a common slang term for email, often used interchangeably. It refers to the electronic transmission of messages and data.

  • For instance, “I’ll shoot you an email, check your mail.”
  • In a conversation about communication methods, someone might say, “I prefer mail for official correspondence.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you get my mail about the project?”

68. Inbox

This term refers to the folder in an email account where incoming messages are stored. It represents the main hub for received emails.

  • For example, “I have a lot of unread messages in my inbox.”
  • In a discussion about email organization, someone might say, “I always make sure to clean up my inbox.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you check your inbox for the document I sent?”

69. Spam

This term refers to unsolicited or unwanted emails, often sent in bulk. It can also refer to junk or promotional emails.

  • For instance, “My inbox is full of spam, I need to clean it up.”
  • In a conversation about email filters, someone might say, “I set up a spam filter to block unwanted messages.”
  • A person might complain, “I keep getting spam emails from this company.”

70. CC

This is a term used in email to indicate that additional recipients have been included in the message. It stands for “carbon copy” and is similar to the concept of CC in traditional paper-based correspondence.

  • For example, “I’ll CC you on the email so you’re aware of the conversation.”
  • In a discussion about email etiquette, someone might say, “Always double-check who you CC in an email.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you CC me on the email chain for reference?”

71. BCC

BCC is a feature in email that allows the sender to send a copy of an email to someone without the other recipients knowing. It is often used when the sender wants to keep certain recipients’ identities hidden.

  • For example, “I’ll BCC you on the email so that the other recipients don’t see your address.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “Make sure to BCC everyone on the team so that they are all informed.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you BCC me on that email so I can see the conversation?”

72. Junk mail

Refers to unsolicited or unwanted emails that are typically sent in bulk. Junk mail often consists of advertisements, promotional offers, or scams.

  • For example, “I hate it when my inbox is filled with junk mail.”
  • A user might complain, “I keep getting junk mail from this unknown sender.”
  • Another might say, “Make sure to check your junk mail folder in case any important emails got filtered there.”

73. Signature

A block of text or images that is automatically added at the end of an email. Signatures usually include the sender’s name, contact information, and sometimes a personal quote or message.

  • For instance, “I customized my email signature with a funny quote.”
  • A user might ask, “How do I add an image to my email signature?”
  • Another might say, “I always include my professional title in my email signature to make it look more official.”

74. Draft

An email that has been started but not yet sent. Drafts allow users to save their progress and come back to it later to complete or revise the message.

  • For example, “I have a few drafts saved in my email account.”
  • A user might ask, “How do I find my saved drafts?”
  • Another might say, “I always write my emails as drafts first before sending them.”

75. Outbox

A folder or section in an email client where outgoing emails are stored before they are sent. The outbox is where emails wait until the user’s device is connected to the internet or until a scheduled send time.

  • For instance, “I have a few emails in my outbox that I need to send.”
  • A user might ask, “Why are my emails stuck in the outbox?”
  • Another might say, “I always double-check my outbox before closing my email client to make sure all emails have been sent.”

76. Sent folder

A folder in an email client where copies of sent emails are stored. The sent folder allows users to keep track of the emails they have sent and review the content or recipients if needed.

  • For example, “I found the email I sent last week in my sent folder.”
  • A user might ask, “How long are emails kept in the sent folder?”
  • Another might say, “I always move important sent emails to a separate folder for easy reference.”

77. Trash

This refers to the action of permanently removing an email from your inbox. When you trash an email, it is sent to the trash folder or deleted folder, where it can be permanently deleted or recovered within a certain time frame.

  • For instance, if you receive a spam email, you might say, “I’m just going to trash this email.”
  • In a conversation about email management, someone might ask, “How often do you empty your trash folder?”
  • If you accidentally delete an important email, you might say, “Oops, I trashed that email by mistake.”

78. Spam folder

This is a folder in your email account where suspected spam or unsolicited emails are automatically routed. It helps to filter out unwanted messages and keep your inbox clean.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you get my email?” you might respond, “Let me check my spam folder.”
  • In a discussion about email security, someone might say, “Make sure to regularly check your spam folder for any legitimate emails that may have been filtered.”
  • If you find an important email in your spam folder, you might say, “I found your email in my spam folder. Sorry for the delay in responding.”

79. Archive

This refers to the action of moving an email from your inbox to a separate folder for long-term storage. Archiving helps to declutter your inbox while still keeping important emails easily accessible.

  • For instance, if you want to keep a record of a receipt, you might say, “I’m going to archive this email.”
  • In a conversation about email organization, someone might ask, “How do you decide which emails to archive?”
  • If you’re searching for an old email, someone might suggest, “Check your archived folder, it might be there.”

80. Reply

This refers to the action of answering or providing a response to an email. When you reply to an email, you typically address the sender’s message or questions.

  • For example, if someone asks for your availability, you might reply, “I’m available on Friday.”
  • In a discussion about email etiquette, someone might say, “Always remember to reply to emails in a timely manner.”
  • If you receive a compliment via email, you might respond with, “Thank you for your kind words. I appreciate it.”

81. Folder

This is a digital container used to organize and categorize emails. Folders are created within an email account to help manage and sort incoming and outgoing messages.

  • For instance, if you want to organize your work emails, you might create a folder called “Work” and move relevant emails into it.
  • In a conversation about email organization, someone might ask, “How many folders do you have in your email account?”
  • If you’re searching for a specific email, someone might suggest, “Check your ‘Important’ folder, it might be there.”

82. Read receipt

A read receipt is a notification sent to the sender of an email to confirm that the recipient has opened and read the email. It is often used in professional settings to track the status of important emails.

  • For example, “I sent an email to my boss and requested a read receipt to make sure she received it.”
  • In a discussion about email etiquette, someone might say, “I always enable read receipts for important emails so I know they’ve been seen.”
  • A user might ask, “Does anyone know how to disable read receipts in Gmail?”